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CATALOGUE OF THE 



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1955-1956 SESSION 
With Announcements For 1956-1957 Session 



BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/dentistr62unse 



Official Publication 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTEENTH CATALOGUE 

WITH 
ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR THE 1956-1957 SESSION 

BALTIMORE COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 

DENTAL SCHOOL 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 




BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 



The School of Dentistry reserves the right to change any provision or 
requirement in this catalogue at any time. 



4 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

ADMINISTRATIVE ORGANIZATION 

The Government of the University is vested by law in a Board of Regents, 
consisting of eleven members appointed by the Governor each for a term of 
nine years. The administration of the University is vested in the President. 

Each school has its own Faculty Council, composed of the Dean and mem- 
bers of its faculty of professorial rank; each Faculty Council controls the 
internal affairs of the group it represents. 

The University organization comprises the following administrative divisions: 

College of Agriculture 

College of Arts and Sciences 

College of Business and Public Administration 

College of Education 

College of Engineering, The Glenn L. Martin Institute of Technology 

College of Home Economics 

College of Military Science 

College of Physical Education, Recreation, and Health 

College of Special and Continuation Studies 

Agricultural Experiment Station 

Agricultural and Home Economics Extension Service 

Agricultural Services and Controls 

Graduate School 

Summer Session 

School of Dentistry 

School of Law 

School of Medicine 

School of Nursing 

School of Pharmacy 

The University Hospital 

The Schools of Dentistry, Law, Medicine, Nursing, and Pharmacy, and the 
Hospital are located in Baltimore in the vicinity of Lombard and Greene 
Streets; the School of Education has a Baltimore Division; the others are in 
College Park. 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 5 

Board of Regents 

Term 
Expires 

William P. Cole, Jr., Chairman Baltimore 1958 

Mrs. JohnT.. Whitehurst, Vice-Chairman.. Baltimore 1956 

B. Herbert Brown, Secretary Baltimore 1960 

Louis L. Kaplan, Assistant Secretary Baltimore 1961 

Harry H. Nuttle, Treasurer Denton 1957 

Edmund S. Burke, Assistant Treasurer Cumberland 1959 

Edward F. Holter Middletown 1959 

Charles P. McCormick Baltimore 1957 

Enos S. Stockbridge Baltimore 1960 

Thomas B. Symons College Park 1963 

C. Ewing Tuttle Baltimore 1962 



President of the University 
Wilson Homer Elkins, B.A., M.A., B.Litt, D.Phil. 



Educational Council 

The President, Dean of the Faculty, Chairman, Deans of Colleges, Chairmen of 

Academic Divisions, Heads of Educational Departments, Director of Admissions and 
Registrations. 



6 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Wilson Homer Elkins, B.A., M.A., B.Litt., D.Phil., President of the University 

Myron S. Aisenberg, D.D.S., Dean 

Katharine Toomey, Administrative Assistant 

G. Watson Algire, M.S., Director of Admissions and Registrations 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

1955-1956 SESSION 

Emeriti 

J. Ben Robinson, D.D.S., D. Sc, Dean Emeritus 
Burt B. Ide, D.D.S., Professor Emeritus of Operative Dentistry 

Professors 

♦Myron S. Aisenberg, Professor of Pathology. 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1922. 

♦Joseph Calton Biddix, Jr., Professor of Oral Diagnosis. 

D.D.S., University oi Maryland, 1934. 
*Edward C. Dobbs, Professor of Pharmacology and Therapeutics. 

D.D.S.. University of Maryland, 1929 ; B.S., 1952. 

$Brice Marden Dorsey, Professor of Oral Surgery. 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1927. 

♦Gardner Patrick Henry Foley, Professor of Dental Literature. 
B.A., Clark University, 1923; M.A., 1926. 

*Grayson Wilbur Gaver, Professor of Dental Prosthesis. 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1922. 

♦William Edward Hahn, Professor of Anatomy. 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1931; A.B., University of Rochester, 1938; M.S., 
1939. 

♦Marion W. McCrea, Professor of Histology and Embryology. 

D.D.S., Ohio State University, 1935 ; M.S., University of Rochester, 1937. 

♦Ernest B. Nuttall, Professor of Fixed Partial Prosthesis. 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1931. 

♦Robert Harold Oster, Professor of Physiology. 

B.S., The Pennsylvania State University, 1923; M.S., 1926; Ph.D., Harvard Uni- 
versity, 1933. 

Kyrle W. Preis, Professor of Orthodontics. 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1929. 

♦Kenneth Vincent Randolph, Professor of Operative Dentistry. 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1939 ; B.S., 1951. 

♦Donald E. Shay, Professor of Bacteriology. 

B.S.. Lebanon Valley College, 1937 ; M.S., University of Maryland, 1938 ; Ph.D., 
1943. 

♦E. G. Vanden Bosche, Professor of Biochemistry. 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College. 1922; M.S., University of Maryland, 1924; Ph.D., 
1927. 



•Full time JHalf time 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 7 

Associate Professors 

♦Joseph Patrick Cappuccio, Associate Professor of Oral Surgery. 

B.S., University of Rhode Island, 1943 ; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1946. 
^Benjamin Anthony Dabrowski, Associate Professor of Oral Roentgenology. 

A.B.. The Johns Hopkins University. 1932 ; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1940. 
♦Stanley H. Dosh, Associate Professor of Fixed Partial Prosthesis. 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1935. 
■j-Harold Golton. Associate Professor of Oral Diagnosis. 

D.D.S., University of Maryland. 1925. 
George McLean, Associate Professor of Physical Diagnosis and Principles of 
Medicine. 

M.D., University of Maryland. 1916. 
♦Peter McLean Lu. Associate Professor of Fixed Partial Prosthesis. 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1934. 
♦Jose Enrique Medina, Associate Professor of Operative Dentistry. 

D.D.S., University of Maryland. 1948. 
♦Walter L. Oggesen, Associate Professor of Fixed Partial Prosthesis. 

D.D.S., University of Maryland. 1926. 
♦D. Vincent Provenza, Associate Professor of Histology and Embryology. 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1939; M.S., 1941; Ph.D., 1952. 
♦Wilbur Owen Ramsey, Associate Professor of Dental Prosthesis. 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1943. 
♦Douglas John Sanders, Associate Professor of Pedodontics. 

B.S., Northwestern University, 1946, D.D.S., 1948. 
♦♦Nathan B. Scherr, Associate Professor of Pedodontics. 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1922. 
♦Josephine Ezekiel Schueler, Associate Professor of Visual Aids. 
♦Guy Paul Thompson, Associate Professor of Anatomy. 

A.B., West Virginia University, 1923 ; A.M., 1929. 
♦L. Edward Warner, Associate Professor of Dental Prosthesis. 

D.D.S.. University of Maryland, 1931. 
Tobias Weinberg, Associate Professor of Pathology. 

A.B., The Johns Hopkins University, 1930; M.D.. 1933. 
JRiley S. Williamson, Jr., Associate Professor of Dental Prosthesis. 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1942. 



Assistant Professors 

Irving I. Aeramson, Assistant Professor of Oral Medicine. 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1932. 

♦William Robert Biddington, Assistant Professor of Oral Medicine. 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1948. 

♦Hugh M. Clement, Jr., Assistant Professor of Operative Dentistry. 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1944. 

A. Bernard Eskow, Assistant Professor of Oral Medicine. 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1938. 

♦Yam-Hin Louie, Assistant Professor of Operative Dentistry. 

B.S., Lingnan University, Canton, China, 1938; D.D.S., Northwestern University, 
1945 ; M.S.D., 1946. 



♦Full time tHalf time 

•♦Deceased March 19, 1956 
tLeave of absence 



8 UNIVERSITY OF MARYL+4ND 

Burton Robert Pollack, Assistant Professor of Physiology. 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 194 6. 
Daniel Edward Shehan, Assistant Professor of Orthodontics. 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1922. 

E. Roderick Shipley, Assistant Professor of Physiology. 

A.B., The Johns Hopkins University, 1938 ; M.D., University of Maryland, 1942. 
Arthur G. Siwinski, Assistant Professor of Oral Surgery. 

A.B., The Johns Hopkins University, 1927; M.D., University of Maryland, 1931. 
D. Robert Swinehart, Assistant Professor of Orthodontics. 

A.B.. Dartmouth College, 1933 ; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1937. 

$Edmond G. Vanden Bosche, Assistant Professor of Dental Anatomy. 

B.S.. The Pennsylvania State University, 1943 ; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 
1947. 

Special Lecturers 

Robert B. Dodd, Professor of Anesthesiology (School of Medicine). 

M.D.. University of Nebraska, 1945. 
Richard Lindenberg, Lecturer in Neuroanatomy. 

M.D., University of Berlin, 1944. 
Ethelbert Lovett, Lecturer in Ethics. 

D.D.S., Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, 1922. 
Paul A. Pumpian, Lecturer in Jurisprudence. 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1950 ; LL.B., 1953. 
Harry M. Robinson, Jr., Professor of Dermatology (School of Medicine). 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1931; M.D., 1935. 

F. Noel Smith, Lecturer in Dental Prosthesis. 

D.D.S., Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, 1923. 
George Herschel Yeager, Professor of Clinical Surgery (School of Medicine). 
B.S., West Virginia University, 1927 ; M.D., University of Maryland. 1929. 

Instructors 

Alvin David Aisenberg, Instructor in Pathology. 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1945. 
Sterrett P. Beaven, Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1941. 
Jordan S. Bloom, Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 

B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1949 ; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1953. 
Samuel Hollinger Bryant, Instructor in Oral Diagnosis. 

A.B., Western Maryland College, 1928 ; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1932. 
Arthur Merrick Bushey, Instructor in Oral Surgery. 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1950. 
Thomas F. Clement, Instructor in Oral Medicine. 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1951. 
Jerome S. Cullen, Instructor in Clinical Orthodontics. 

D.D.S.. University of Maryland, 1941. 
$Fred Ehrlich, Instructor in Pedodontics. 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1947. 
♦William Henry Gaffney, Jr., Instructor in Oral Roentgenology. 

B.S., Loyola College, 1950; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1954. 
*Calvin Joseph Gaver, Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1950 ; D.D.S., 1954. 

♦Full time JHalf time 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 9 

Ralph Jack Gordon, Instructor in Dental Prosthesis. 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1933. 
Marvin M. Graham, Instructor in Fixed Partial Prosthesis. 

A.B., Cornell University, 1938; A.M., 1939; D.D.S., University of Pennsylvania, 

1943. 
♦William Lee Graham, Instructor in Oral Diagnosis. 

B.S., Marietta College, 1948 ; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1953. 
Walter Granruth, Jr., Instructor in Pathology. 

B.S., Loyola College, 1950; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1954. 
Paul Frederick Guerin, Instructor in Pathology. 

A.B., Wittenberg Coliege, 1942 ; M.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1945. 

♦John Miller Hyson, Instructor in Oral Surgery. 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1950. 
Conrad Lucius Inman, Instructor in Anesthesiology. 

D.D.S.. Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, 1915. 
Melvin John Jagielski, Instructor in Dental Anatomy. 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1953. 
Frank G. Kuehn, Instructor in Clinical Medicine. 

A.B., University of North Carolina, 1946 ; M.D., University of Maryland, 1950. 
Lester Lebo, Instructor in Oral Diagnosis. 

B.S., University of Chicago, 1938; M.D., 1941. 
Richard R. C. Leonard, Instructor in Public Health Dentistry. 

D.D.S., Indiana University, 1922; M.S.P.H., University of Michigan, 1944. 
Charles E. Love man, Instructor in Anatomy. 

A.B.. The Johns Hopkins University, 1935 ; D.D.S., Columbia University, 1939. 

♦Martin H. Morris, Instructor in Biochemistry. 

B.S., Rutgers University, 1952; M.S., 1954. 

Frank N. Ogden, Instructor in First Aid and in Charge of Medical Care of 

Students. 

M.D., University of Maryland, 1917. 

♦Alba Jane Carr Proutt, Junior Instructor in Visual Aids. 

B.A.. Washington College, 1953^ 

Leonard Rapoport, Instructor in Pharmacology. 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1937; D.D.S., 1944. 

Norton Morris Ross, Instructor in Pharmacology. 

B.S.. University of Connecticut, 1949 ; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1954. 

Myron Hillard Sachs, Instructor in Anatomy. 

D.D.S., Columbia University, 1939. 

♦Theresa P. Sakalusky, Junior Instructor in Visual Aids. 

B.S., Kuntztown State Teachers College, 1952. 

Aaron Schaeffer, Instructor in Clinical Orthodontics. 

B.A., Western Maryland College, 1939 ; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1947 ; M.S., 
University of Illinois, 1948. 

♦Frank J. Sinnreich, Jr., Instructor in Anatomy. 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1951. 

Glenn D. Steele, Instructor in Fixed Partial Prosthesis. 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1942. 

♦Claude P. Taylor, Instructor in Visual Aids. 

Earle Harris Watson, Instructor in Dental Materials and Dental Prosthesis. 

A.B., University of North Carolina, 1938; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1942. 

Graduate Assistants 

♦Maria Paz Flor, Graduate Assistant in Oral Pathology and Oral Surgery. 
D.D.M., University of the Philippines, 1950. 

•Full time 



10 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

♦Robert Luers Heldrich, Graduate Assistant in Oral Surgery. 

A.B., Gettysburg College, 1951; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1955. 
♦Herbert H. James, Jr., Graduate Assistant in Bacteriology. 

B.S., Montana State College, 1951; M.A., Montana State University, 1954. 
♦Leonard H. Jarvis, Graduate Assistant in Oral Surgery. 

A.B., West Virginia University, 1952; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1955. 
♦Charles Brown Leonard, Jr., Graduate Assistant in Biochemistry. 

B.A., Rutgers College of South Jersey, 1955. 
♦Mitchel Pozega, Graduate Assistant in Oral Surgery. 

A.B., West Virginia University, 1951 ; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1955. 

Library Staff 

Dentistry-Pharmacy 

Ida Marian Robinson, Librarian and Associate Professor of Library Science. 

A.B., Cornell University, 1924 ; B.S.L.S., Columbia University School of Library 
Service, 1944. 

Hilda E. Moore, Associate Librarian. 

A.B., Randolph Macon Woman's College, 1936 ; A.B.L.S., Emory University 
Library School, 1937. 

Beatrice Marriott, Reference Librarian. 

A.B.. University of Maryland, 1944. 

Curtis G. Crom, Periodicals Librarian. 

A.B., George Washington University, 1949; M.S.L.S., Syracuse University Library 
School, 1954. 

Harriette W. S helton, Chief Cataloguer. 

B.A., The Pennsylvania State College, 1935 ; B.S.L.S., Columbia University School 
of Library Service, 1937. 

Marjorie Fluck, Cataloguer. 

B.S. in Ed., Kutztown State Teachers College, 1952. 
Marjorie H. Jarvis, Library Assistant. 
Elizabeth E. McCoach, Assistant to the Librarian. 
Patricia C. Watkins, Assistant to the Cataloguer. 

Laboratory Technicians 

Earl F. Becker Department of Bacteriology 

Jane C. Clark, A.B Department of Anatomy 

Ann K. Dentry, B.S Department of Histology 

Joseph F. Killian Department of Pathology 

Leah M. Proutt, B.S., M.S Department of Physiology 

Mary H. Stienemann -Department of Roentgenology 

Henry Yeager Department of Orthodontics 

Assisting Staff 
June G. Bingen, R.N., Assistant in Oral Surgery. 
John S. Chanaud, Assistant. 
Lorraine J. Cook, Stenographer. 



'Full time 



School of dentistkv n 



Ruth E. Cooke, Secretary, Diagnostic Clinic. 

Marie Antoinette De Juliis, Stenographer. 

Jean Lee Dorsey, Secretary, Prosthetic Clinic. 

Eleanor B. Eckert, Stenographer. 

Johanna K. Eichner, Information and Case Record Clerk. 

Ellen L. Frank, Stenographer 

Mary A. Hagan, Secretary, Orthodontic Clinic. 

Zita Marie Kuhx, Secretary, Roentgenology Clinic. 

Patricia R. Mall, Secretary, Oral Surgery Clinic. 

Mary P. O'Grady, Stenographer. 

Dorothy P. Peregoy, Accountant, Clinics. 

William J. Sachs, Assistant. 

Addie A. Spicer, Cashier. 

Anna Timchula, Stenographer. 

Katherine L. Underwood, Stenographer. 









12 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

HISTORY 

The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery occupies an important and inter- 
esting place in the history of dentistry. At the end of the regular session — 
1954-55 — it completed its one hundred and fifteenth year of service to dental 
education. The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery represents the first effort 
in history to offer institutional dental education to those anticipating the practice 
of dentistry. 

The first lectures on dentistry in America were delivered by Dr. Horace 
H. Hayden in the University of Maryland, School of Medicine, between the 
years 1823-25. These lectures were interrupted in 1825 by internal dissensions 
in the School of Medicine and were as a consequence discontinued. It was 
Dr. Hayden's idea that dental education merited greater attention than had been 
given it by medicine or could be given it by the preceptorial plan of dental teaching 
then in vogue. 

Dr. Horace H. Hayden began the practice of dentistry in Baltimore in 
1800. From that time he made a zealous attempt to lay the foundation for a 
scientific, serviceable dental profession. In 1831 Dr. Chapin A. Harris came to 
Baltimore to study under Hayden. Dr. Harris was a man of unusual ability 
and possessed special qualifications to aid in establishing and promoting formal 
dental education. Since Dr. Hayden's lectures had been interrupted at the 
University of Maryland and there was an apparent unsurmountable difficulty 
confronting the creation of dental departments in medical schools, an independent 
college was decided upon. A charter was applied for and granted by the Mary- 
land Legislature February 1, 1840. The first Faculty meeting was held February 
3, 1840, at which time Dr. Horace H. Hayden was elected President and Dr. 
Chapin A. Harris, Dean. The introductory lecture was delivered by Dr. Hayden 
on November 3, 1840, to the five students matriculating in the first class 
Thus was created as the foundation of the present dental profession the Balti- 
more College of Dental Surgery, the first dental school in the world. 

Hayden and Harris, the admitted founders of conventional dental education, con 
tributed, in addition to the factor of dental education, other opportunities for pro 
fessional growth and development. In 1839 the American Journal of Dental Science 
was founded, with Chapin A. Harris as its editor. Dr. Harris continued fully re 
sponsible for dentistry's initial venture into periodic dental literature to the time of 
his death. The files of the old American Journal of Dental Science testify to the 
fine contributions made by Dr. Harris. In 1840 the American Society of Dental 
Surgeons was founded, with Dr. Horace H. Hayden as its President and Dr. Chapir 
A. Harris as its Corresponding Secretary. This was the beginning of dental 
organization in America, and was the forerunner of the American Dental Association 
which now numbers approximately eighty-four thousand in its present membership 
The foregoing suggests the unusual influence Baltimore dentists and the Baltimon 
College of Dental Surgery have exercised on professional ideals and policies. 

In 1873, the Maryland Dental College, an offspring of the Baltimore Collegi 
of Dental Surgery, was organized. It continued instruction until 1878, at whicll 
time it was consolidated with the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery. A 
department of dentistry was organized at the University of Maryland in thj 
year 1882, graduating a class each year from 1883 to 1923. This school wa 
chartered as a corporation and continued as a privately owned and directe 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 13 

institution until 1920, when it became a State institution. The Dental Depart- 
ment of the Baltimore Medical College was established in 1895, continuing until 
1913, when it merged with the Dental Department of the University of Maryland. 
The final combining of the dental educational interests of Baltimore was 
effected June 15, 1923, by the amalgamation of the student bodies of the Balti- 
more College of Dental Surgery and the University of Maryland, School of 
Dentistry; the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery becoming a distinct depart- 
ment of the University under State supervision and control. Thus we find in 
the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, University of Maryland, 
a merging of the various efforts at dental education in Maryland. From these 
component elements have radiated developments of the art and science of 
dentistry until the strength of its alumni is second to none, either in number or 
degree of service to the profession. 

BUILDING 

The School of Dentistry is located at the northwest corner of Lombard and 
Greene Streets, adjoining the University Hospital. The building occupied by 
the Dental School provides approximately fifty thousand square feet of floor 
space, is fireproof, splendidly lighted and ventilated, and is ideally arranged for 
efficient use. It contains a sufficient number of large lecture rooms, classrooms, 
a library and reading room, science laboratories, technic laboratories, clinic 
rooms, and locker rooms. It is furnished with new equipment throughout and 
provides every accommodation necessary for satisfactory instruction under com- 
fortable arrangements and pleasant surroundings. 

Special attention has been given to the facilities in clinic instruction. The 
large clinic wing contains 148 operating spaces ; each space contains a chair, 
operating table and unit equipped with an electric engine, compressed air, gas, 
running water, etc. Clinic instruction is segregated, and the following depart- 
ments have been arranged for effective teaching: Operative, Prosthesis (including 
Fixed Partial Prosthesis and Ceramics), Anesthetics and Surgery, Oral Medicine, 
Orthodontics, Diagnosis, Pedodontics, Roentgenology, and Visual Aids. All 
technic laboratories are equipped with every modern facility to promote efficiency 
in instruction. 

LIBRARY 

The Dental School is fortunate in having one of the better equipped and 
organized dental libraries among the dental schools of the country. The Library 
is located in the main building and consists of a stack room, offices and a 
reading room accommodating ninety-six students. Over 16 000 books and bound 
journals on dentistry and the collateral sciences, together with numerous 
pamphlets, reprints and unbound journals, are available for the student's use. 
More than 200 journals are regularly received by the Library. An adequate 
staff promotes the growth of the Library and assists the student body in the 
use of the Library's resources. The Library is financed by direct appropriations 
from the State, by the income from the endowment established by the Maryland 
State Dental Association and by the proceeds of the sale of books to students. 
One of the most important factors of the dental student's education is to teach 



14 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

him the value and the use of dental literature in his formal education and in 
promoting his usefulness and value to the profession during practice. The Balti- 
more College of Dental Surgery is ideally equipped to achieve this aim of dental 
instruction. 

COURSE OF INSTRUCTION 

The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, University of 
Maryland, offers a course in dentistry devoted to instruction in the medical 
sciences, the dental sciences, and clinical practice. Instruction consists of didactic 
lectures, laboratory instruction, demonstrations, conferences, quizzes and hospital 
ward rounds. Topics are assigned for collateral reading to train the student in the 
value and use of dental literature. The curriculum for the complete course appears 
on pages 16 and 17 of this catalogue. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

Applicants for admission must present evidence of having completed success- 
fully two academic years of work in an accredited college of arts and sciences 
based upon the completion of a four-year high school course or the equivalent 
in entrance examinations. The college course must include at least a year's 
credit in English, in biology, in physics, in inorganic chemistry, and in organic 
chemistry. All required science courses shall include both classroom and labora- 
tory instruction. Although a minimum of 60 semester hours of credit, exclusive 
of physical education and military science, is required, additional courses in the 
humanities and the natural and social sciences are desirable. By ruling of the 
Faculty Council, all admission requirements must be completed by June 30 
previous to the desired date of admission. 

Tn considering candidates for admission, the Committee on Admissions will 
give preference to those applicants who have high scholastic records in secondary 
school and in college; who make satisfactory scores in the dental aptitude tests; 
who present favorable recommendations from their respective predental com- 
mittee or from one instructor in each of the departments of biology, chemistry, 
and physics; and who, in all other respects, give every promise of becoming 
successful students and dentists of high standing. Applicants will not be admitted 
with unabsolved conditions or unabsolved failures. 

COMBINED ARTS AND SCIENCES-DENTAL PROGRAM 

The University offers a combined arts and sciences-dental curriculum 
leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Science and Doctor of Dental Surgery. 
The preprofessional part of this curriculum shall be taken in residence in the 
College of Arts and Sciences at College Park, and the professional part in the 
School of Dentistry in Baltimore. 

Students who elect the combined program and who have completed the 
arts and sciences phase of it may, upon the recommendation of the Dean of the 
School of Dentistry, be granted the degree of Bachelor of Science by the College 
of Arts and Sciences at the commencement following the completion of thel, 
student's second year in the School of Dentistry. A student may enter thq 
arts and sciences-dental program at College Park with advanced standing from ar 
accredited college or university, but the last year of the preprofessional training 
must be completed at College Park and the professional training must be com' 
pleted in the School of Dentistry of the University of Maryland. * 



SCHOOL Of DENTISTRY 15 

Arts-Dentistry Curriculum 

, — Semester—^ 
Freshman Year I II 

Eng. i. 2,— Composition and American Literature 3 3 

Zool. 1 — General Zoology 4 .... 

ZooL -— Advanced General Zoology .... 4 

Chem. 1, 3— General Chemistry 4 4 

Math. 10, 11— Algebra, Trigonometry, Analytic Geometry 3 3 

Speech 18, 19— Introductory Speech 1 1 

Physical Activities 1 1 

A. S. 1, 2— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Hea. 2, 4— Hygiene (Women) 2 2 

Total 18-19 18-19 

Sophomore Year 

Eng. 3, 4 or 5, 6— Composition and World or English Literature 3 3 

Soc. 1— Sociology of American Life \ 

and \, 3 3 

G. & P. 1— American Government j 

Chem. 35, 36, 37, 38— Organic Chemistry 4 4 

*H. 5, 6— History of American Civilization 3 3 

f Modern Language 3 3 

Physical Activities 1 1 

A. S. 3, 4— Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Total 17-20 17-20 

Junior Year 

Modern Language (continued) 3 3 

Phys. 10, 11— Fundamentals of Physics 4 4 

Approved Minor Courses 9 9 

Electives 3 3 

Total L9 19 

Senior Year 

The curriculum of the first year of the School of Dentistry of the University 
of Maryland is accepted by the College of Arts and Sciences as the fourth year 
(major sequence) of academic work toward the degree of Bachelor of Science. 

If at the end of the junior year the student decides to postpone his entrance 
to the School of Dentistry and to remain in the College of Arts and Sciences 
and complete work for the Bachelor's degree, he may choose a major and minor 
in any of the departments in which he has completed the necessary underclass 
requirements. The general nature of the first three years of this curriculum and 
the generous electives of the third year make possible for the student a wide 
choice of departments in which he may specialize. In general the electives of 
the third year will be chosen as for a major in some particular department. 



•Students planning to requesl admission t<< the Dental School with only two years of 

tal training should lake Physics 10-11. 
tFr. or Ger. ,; . 7— Intermediate Scientific Frencfe or German reeommendedi 



16 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



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18 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION AND ENROLLMENT 

In the selection of students to begin the study of dentistry the School con- 
siders particularly a candidate's proved ability in secondary education and his 
successful completion of prescribed courses in predental collegiate training. 
The requirements for admission and the academic regulations of the College of 
Arts and Sciences, University of Maryland, are strictly adhered to by the 
School of Dentistry. 

A student is not regarded as having matriculated in the School of Dentistry 
until such time as he shall have paid the matriculation fee of $10.00, and is not 
enrolled until he shall have paid a deposit of $285.00 if a nonresident or $175.00 
if a resident student. This deposit is intended to insure registration in the class 
and is not returnable. 

APPLICATION PROCEDURES 

Candidates seeking admission to the Dental School should first write to 
the Office of the Dean requesting a preliminary information form. Upon the 
receipt and the examination of this form by the Committee on Admissions an 
application blank will be sent to those candidates who merit consideration. 
Each applicant should fill out the blank in its entirety and mail it promptly, 
together with the application fee and photographs, to the Committee on Admissions, 
Dental School, University of Maryland, Baltimore 1, Maryland. The early filing of 
an application is urged. Applicants wishing advice on any problem relating to their 
predental training or their application should communicate with the Committee 
on Admissions. 

All applicants will be required to take the Dental Aptitude Test. This 
test will be given at various testing centers throughout the United States, its 
possessions and Canada. Applicants will be notified by the Council on Dental 
Education of the American Dental Association of the dates of the tests and the 
locations of the testing centers. 

Promising candidates will be required to appear before the Committee 
on Admissions for an interview. On the basis of all available information the 
best possible applicants will be chosen for admission to the School. 

A certificate of entrance will be issued to each successful applicant, which 
will permit him to matriculate and to register in the class to which he has 
applied. 

ADMISSION WITH ADVANCED STANDING 

(a) Graduates in medicine or students in medicine who have completed two 
or more years in a medical school, acceptable to standards in the School of Medicine, 
University of Maryland, may be given advanced standing to the Sophomore year 
proznded the applicant shall complete under competent regular instruction the courses 
in dental technology regularly scheduled in the first year. 

(b) Applicants for transfer must (1) meet fully the requirements for ad- 
mission to the first year of the dental course; (2) be eligible for promotion to 
the next higher class in the school from which he seeks to transfer; (3) show an 
average grade of five per cent above the passing mark in the school where 
transfer credits were earned; (4) show evidence of scholastic attainments, char- 
acter and personality; (5) present letter of honorable dismissal and recommen- 
iation from the dean of the school from which he transfers. 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 19 

(c) All applicants for transfer must present themselves in person for an 
interview before qualifying certificate can be issued. 

ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS 

In order to receive credit for a full session, each student must have entered 
and be in attendance on the day the regular session opens, at which time lectures 
to all classes begin, and remain until the close of the session, the dates for which 
are announced in the calendar of the annual catalogue. 

Regular attendance is demanded. A student whose attendance in any 
course is unsatisfactory to the head of the department will be denied the privilege 
of final examination in any and all such courses. A student with less than 85 
per cent attendance will not be promoted to the next succeeding year. How- 
ever, in certain unavoidable circumstances of absences, the Dean and Faculty 
Council may honor excuses exceeding the maximum permitted. 

GRADING AND PROMOTION 

The following symbols are used as marks for final grades: A (100-91), 
B (90-84), C (83-77), and D (76-70), Passing; F (below 70), Failure.; I, In- 
complete. Progress grades in courses are indicated as "Satisfactory" and 
"Unsatisfactory." 

A Failure in any subject may be removed only by repeating the subject 
in full. Students who have done work of acceptable quality in their completed 
assignments but who, because of circumstances beyond their control, have been 
unable to finish all assignments, will be given an Incomplete. A student shall 
not carry an Incomplete into the next succeeding year. When he has completed 
the requirements for the removal of an Incomplete, the student shall be given 
the actual grade earned in the course. 

Scholastic averages are computed on the basis of semester credits assigned 
to each course and numerical values for grades. The numerical values are 
A-4; B-3; C-2; D-l; F-0. The grade point average is the sum of the products 
of semester credits and grade values, divided by the total number of semester 
credits. 

Students who attain a grade point average of 1.5 in the Freshman year will 
be promoted. At the end of the Sophomore year an overall grade point 
average of 1.75 is required for promotion. A grade point average of 2.0 is 
required for promotion to the Senior year and for graduation. 

EQUIPMENT 

A complete list of necessary instruments and materials for technic and 
clinic courses is prescribed by the Dental School. Arrangements are made by 
the Dental School in advance of formal enrollment for books, instruments and 
materials to be delivered to the student at the opening of school. Each student 
is required to provide himself promptly with these prescribed necessities. A 
student who does not meet this requirement will not be permitted to continue 
with his class. 

DEPORTMENT 

The profession of dentistry demands, and the School of Dentistry requires, 
of its students evidence of their good moral character. The conduct of the 
student in relation to his work and fellow students will indicate his fitness 
to be taken into the confidence of the community as a professional man. In- 



20 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

tegrity, sobriety, temperate habits, truthfulness, respect for authority and asso- 
ciates and honesty in the transaction of business affairs as a student will be 
considered as evidence of good moral character necessary to the granting of a 
degree. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 
The degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery is conferred upon a candidate who 
has met the following conditions: 

1. A candidate must furnish documentary evidence that he has attained the 
age of 21 years. 

2. A candidate for graduation shall have attended the full scheduled course 
of four academic years. 

3. He will be required to show a grade point average of 2.0 for the full course 
of study. 

4. He shall have satisfied all technic and clinic requirements of the various 
departments. 

5. He shall have paid all indebtedness to the college prior to the beginning 
of final examinations, and must have adjusted his financial obligations in the 
community satisfactorily to those to whom he may be indebted. 

FEES 

Matriculation fee (required of all entering students) $ 10.00 

Tuition (each year) : 

Non-resident student 675.00 

Resident student 400.00 

Student health service (each year) 20.00 

Laboratory breakage deposit : 

Freshman year 10.00 

Sophomore and Junior years 5.00 

In addition to fees itemized in the above schedule, the following assessments 

are made by the University: 

Application fee (paid at time of filing formal application for admission) 7.50 

Late registration fee 5.00 

(All students are expected to complete their registration, including 
payment of bills, on the regular registration days.) Those who do 
not complete their registration during the prescribed days will be 
charged a fee of $5.00. 

Examinations taken out of class and re-examinations 5.00 

One certified transcript of record is issued free of charge. 

Each additional copy is issued only upon payment of 1.00 

Student Activities Fee — Special 

For the purpose of administering and disciplining various student activities, 
the Student Senate, after approval by the separate classes and the Faculty 
Council, voted a fee of $12.50 to be paid at the time of registration to the 
Office of the Dean. 

Refunds 

According to the policy of the University no fees will be returned. In case 
the student discontinues his course or fails to register after a place has been 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 21 

reserved in a class, any fees paid will be credited to a subsequent course, but are 
not transferable. 

REGISTRATION 

The registration of a student in any school or college of the University shall 
be regarded as a registration in the University of Maryland, but when such 
student transfers to a professional school of the University or from one profes- 
sional school to another, he must pay the usual matriculation fee required by 
each professional school. 

Each student is required to fill in a registration card for the office of the 
Registrar, and make payment of one-half of the tuition fee in addition to all 
other fees noted as payable before being admitted to classwork at the opening 
of the session. The remainder of tuition and fees must be in the hands of the 
Comptroller during registration period for the second half of the academic year. 

The above requirements will be rigidly enforced. 

DEFINITION OF RESIDENCE AND NON-RESIDENCE 

Students who are minors are considered to be resident students if at the 
time of their registration their parents have been domiciled in this state for 
at least one year. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of his 
first registration in the University, and may not thereafter be changed by him 
unless, in the case of a minor, his parents move to and become legal residents of 
the state by maintaining such residence for at least one full year. However, 
the right of the minor student to change from a non-resident to resident status 
must be established by him prior to the registration period for any semester. 

Adult students are considered to be resident if at the time of their registra- 
tion they have been domiciled in this state for at least one year, provided such 
residence has not been acquired while attending any school or college in Mary- 
land or elsewhere. 

The word domicile as used in this regulation shall mean the permanent place 
of abode. For the purpose of this rule only one domicile may be claimed as a 
permanent abode. 

DEPARTMENT OF STUDENT HEALTH 

The School undertakes to supply medical and surgical care for its students 
through the Department of Student Health. This care includes the daily services 
rendered by a physician and a medical secretary in a well-equipped clinic, 
conveniently located in the Dental School. Also consultations, surgical proce- 
dures and hospitalization, judged to be necessary by the Department, are 
covered under liberal limitations, depending on length of hospitalization and 
special expenses incurred. 

Students who need medical attention are expected to report at the office 
of the Department of Student Health. Under circumstances requiring home 
treatment, the students will be visited at their College residences. 

It is not within the scope of the Department to provide medical care for 
conditions antedating each annual registration in the University; nor is it the 



22 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

function of this service to treat chronic conditions contracted by students be- 
fore admission or to extend treatment to acute conditions developing in the 
period between academic years or during authorized school vacations. The cost 
of orthopedic appliances, the correction of visual defects, the services of special 
nurses, and special medication must be paid for by the student. The School 
does not accept responsibility for illness or accident occurring away from the 
community, or for expenses incurred for hospitalization or medical services in 
institutions other than the University Hospital, or, in any case, for medical 
expense not authorized by the Department of Student Health. 

Every new student is required to undergo a complete physical examination, 
which includes oral diagnosis. Any defects noted must be corrected within 
the first school year. The passing of this examination is a requirement for the 
final acceptance of any student. 

Each matriculant must present, on the day of his enrollment, a statement from 
his ophthalmologist regarding the condition of his eyes, and where defects in vision 
exist he shall show evidence that corrections have been made. 

If a student should enter the hospital during the academic year, the De- 
partment will arrange for the payment of part or all of the hospital expenses, 
depending on the length of stay and the special expenses incurred. This ar- 
rangement applies only to students admitted through the office of the School 
physician. 

Prospective students are advised to have any known physical defects cor- 
rected before entering the School in order to prevent loss of time which later 
correction might involve. 

SCHOLARSHIP AND LOAN FUNDS 

A number of scholarship loans from various organizations and educational 
foundations are available to students in the School of Dentistry. These loans 
are offered on the basis of excellence in scholastic attainment and the need 
on the part of students for assistance in completing their course in dentistry. 
It has been the policy of the Faculty to recommend only students in the last 
two years for such privileges. 

The Henry Strong Educational Foundation — From this fund, established under 
the will of General Henry Strong of Chicago, an annual allotment is made to 
the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, University of Mary- 
land, for scholarship loans available for the use of young men and women stu- 
dents under the age of twenty-five. Recommendations for the privileges of 
these loans are limited to students in the Junior and Senior years. Only students 
who through stress of circumstances require financial, aid and who have demon- 
strated excellence in educational progress are considered in making nominations 
to the secretary of this fund. 

The Edzvard S. Gay lord Educational Endowment Fund — Under a provision of 
the will of the late Dr. Edward S. Gaylord, of New Haven, Connecticut, an 
amount approximating $16,000 was left to the Baltimore College of Dental 
Surgery, Dental School, University of Maryland, the proceeds of which are to 
be devoted to aiding worthy young men in securing dental education. 

The W. K. Kellogg Foundation — During World War II the Foundation recog- 
nized the burden that the accelerated tourse imposed upon many dental students 



SCHOOL OF bENTlSTkY 23 

wno under normal circumstances would earn money for their education by 
employment during the summer vacation. The Foundation granted to this 
School a fund to provide rotating loans to deserving dental students. 

The Albert A. Harrington Fund — This fund was established in 1954 by the 
New Jersey Alumni Association in memory of Dr. Albert A. Harrington, a member 
of the Class of 1910. The fund is a source of valuable help in aiding students to 
solve their temporary financial problems. 

The E. Benton Taylor Scholarship — One of the finest scholarships in the field 
of dental education, the E. Benton Taylor Scholarship was conceived and arranged 
by Mrs. Taylor and will be perpetuated by the Luther B. Benton Company of Bal- 
timore. It was put into operation in 1954 and will be awarded annually to a Mary- 
land student of each entering class, who will continue to receive its benefits during 
the four years of his dental school course. 



24 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 



ANATOMY 

GROSS ANATOMY 

Professor Halm, Associate Professor Thompson, Drs. Loveman and Sachs, and 

Mr. Sinnreich 

This course consists of dissection and lectures, supplemented by frequent 
conferences, and practical demonstrations. Each student is required to dissect the 
lateral half of the human body. The osteology of a given region is studied at the 
time of the dissection of that region so that the value of learning this phase of 
anatomy may be better demonstrated. 

The subject is taught with the purpose of emphasizing the principles of 
structure of the body, the knowledge of which is derived from a study of its 
development, its organs and tissues, and the action of its parts. 

Arrangements can be made to accommodate qualified students and dentists 
interested in research or in making special dissections or topographical studies. 

NEUROANATOMY 

Professor Hahn, Associate Professor Thompson, Dr. Lindenberg and Mr. Sinnreich 

Neuroanatomy is offered in the Freshman year following Gross Anatomy. 
The work consists of a study of the whole brain and spinal cord by gross dis- 
sections and microscopic methods. Function is taught with structure; correla- 
tion is made, whenever possible, with the student's work in the histology and 
physiology of the central nervous system. 

COMPARATIVE TOOTH MORPHOLOGY 

Associate Professor Thompson 

The course treats the evolutionary development of dentition as a necessary 
factor in the study of human oral anatomy. It includes a comparative study of 
the teeth of the animal kingdom, both vertebrates and invertebrates, with a 
comparative study of the number, position and form of the teeth. 

TOOTH MORPHOLOGY 

Assistant Professor Edmond G. Vanden Bosche and Dr. Jagielski 

This course is designed to teach the form and structure of the teeth, and 
includes a study of the nomenclature of surfaces, divisions and relations of the 
teeth. In the laboratory the student is trained in the carving of the various 
teeth and in the dissection of extracted teeth through their various dimensions. 

The second part of the course includes a study of the supporting structures of 
the teeth and of the relation of the teeth to these structures. The periods of beginning 
calcification, eruption, complete calcification, and shedding of the deciduous teeth; 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 25 

followed by the periods of beginning calcification, eruption, and complete calcifi- 
cation of the permanent teeth, are studied and correlated with the growth in 
size of the jaws and face. 

BACTERIOLOGY 

Professor Shay and Mr. James 

The course in Bacteriology is given in the Sophomore year. It embraces 
lectures, demonstrations, recitations, and conferences, augmented by guided 
reading. 

Practical and theoretical consideration is given to bacteria, both pathogenic 
and nonpathogenic, viruses, protozoa, and some of the yeasts and molds. Special 
attention is given to those organisms which cause lesions in and about the oral 
cavity, particularly primary focal infection about the teeth, tonsils, pharynx, 
nose, accessory sinuses, adenoids and naso-pharynx, and the types of systemic 
disease which result from the establishment of secondary foci. 

Immunological and serological principles are studied, with special considera- 
tion given to antitoxins, antisera, bacterins, vaccines and antigens which cause 
hypersensitization. 

Laboratory teaching includes the methods of staining and the preparation 
of media; cultural characteristics of bacteria; their reaction to disinfectants, 
antiseptics, germicides and various methods of sterilization; animal inoculation, 
preparation of sera, vaccines, etc.; various laboratory tests and reactions; a 
study of the antibiotics; and demonstrations of virus techniques. 

BIOCHEMISTRY 

Professor V and en- Bosche, Mr. Morris and Mr. Leonard 

The course is given in the Freshman year. The prerequisite subjects are 
inorganic and organic chemistry. Additional training in analytical and physical 
chemistry is desirable. 

Instruction is presented in the form of lectures, demonstrations and laboratory 
experience. The chemistry of living matter, its constituents and processes, 
forms the basis of the course. The detailed subject matter includes the 
chemistry of carbohydrates, fats, proteins, enzymes, vitamins, and hormones; 
the processes of respiration, digestion, metabolism, secretion and excretion are 
considered. 

Instruction in qualitative and quantitative blood and urine examination is 
included. These procedures are given clinical application during the Junior and 
Senior years. 

DENTAL HISTORY 

Professor Foley 
Dentistry occupies a prominent position in the present social structure 



26 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

because of its important relationship to the general health of the individual and 
of the community. From its crude beginnings in ancient times the dental art 
has been improved down through the ages to the present time by various 
educative processes, and has gradually and firmly advanced in scientific quality 
and technological excellence. An appreciation of the true objectives of dentistry 
will be greatly enhanced by the practitioner's knowledge of its philosophy as 
revealed through an understanding of its development to its present high state 
of usefulness. A knowledge of the history of dentistry is a necessary part of the 
education of the modern dentist. Lectures in Dental History describe the be- 
ginnings of the art of dental practice among ancient civilizations, its advance- 
ment in relation to the development of the so-called medical sciences in the 
early civilizations, its struggle through the Middle Ages and, finally, its attain- 
ment of recognized professional status in modern times. Special attention will 
be given to the forces and stresses that have brought about the evolutionary 
progress from a primitive dental art to a scientific health service profession. 



DENTAL MATERIALS 

Professor Gaver; Associate Professors Ramsey and Oggesen; Dr. Watson 

This course is designed to provide the Freshman student with a scientific 
background in the nomenclature, composition, physical properties, practical 
application, and proper manipulation of the important materials used in the 
practice of dentistry, excluding all drugs and medicinals. 

The theoretical aspect of the course is presented by the instructors in the 
form of lectures, demonstrations, informal group discussions, and directed sup- 
plemental reading. From the practical standpoint, the student manipulates and 
tests the various materials in the laboratory, being guided by prepared project 
sheets. 

At the termination of the course, the student will have developed an under- 
standing of the following factors: the importance of scientific testing of a 
material before it is used by the profession at large; the realization of the fact 
that every material has its limitations, which can be compensated for only by 
intelligent application and manipulation; and an appreciation of the vast field of 
research open to those who wish to help improve the materials that are available 
at the present time. 



DENTAL PROSTHESIS 

Professor Gaver; Associate Professors Oggesen, Ramsey, Warner and Williamson; 
Drs. Gordon, Smith and Watson 

This course is carried through four years of study and includes lectures, 
clinics, and demonstrations. It embraces lectures and technic work in the first 
and second years, and lectures and clinics in the third and fourth years. 

The work of the first year is devoted to a study of materials used in denture 
construction. A series of lecture-demonstrations is given, explaining the properties 
and manipulation of all the materials used. Experiments and exercises are ar- 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 27 

ranged to give the student practical knowledge of the materials demonstrated 
and are designed to impress the student with the importance of the essential 
fundamentals in all the various steps in full denture construction. 

During the second year the instruction embraces a study of materials used 
in partial denture construction. Lecture-demonstrations, experiments, exercises, 
and technical demonstrations are given, using the same method of presentation 
followed in the first year. 

The course in the third year includes a study of the practical application 
in the Infirmary of the fundamentals taught in the preceding years. Demonstra- 
tions are offered of the various technics of impression-and bite-taking to provide 
the student with additional knowledge necessary for practical work in the In- 
firmary. 

The last year is given to the application in the Infirmary of the fundamentals 
taught in the previous year, particular attention being given to a standard 
method of denture construction by the clinical instructors to equip the student 
with a basic technic. The didactic course of this year includes all the various 
methods employed in advanced prosthesis. 



FIRST AID 

Dr. Ogden 

This course is offered in the Sophomore year for the purpose of acquainting 
the student with the basic principles of First Aid. Instruction consists of 
lectures combined with practical demonstrations. 



FIXED PARTIAL PROSTHESIS 

Professor Nut tall; Associate Professors Dosh, McLcaii-Lu and Oggesen; 
Drs. M. M. Graham and Steele 

Instruction includes lecture and laboratory courses during the Sophomore 
and Junior years which embrace the teaching of the principles involved and the 
procedures necessary in abutment preparations, the construction of fundamental 
retainers and the assemblage of fixed partial dentures. The technics include the 
construction of pontics, wax manipulation, pattern carving, investing and casting. 

The didactic work in the Junior year includes a study of the biological 
factors, the mechanical requirements and the indications and contraindications 
of fixed partial prosthesis. Instruction is given in the history and development 
of porcelain and methyl methacrylate as restorative materials. These materials 
are employed in the construction of complete jacket crowns, dowel crowns, and 
staining and glazing technic. 

During the Junior and Senior years excellent clinical opportunities arc 
afforded the student to fulfill the practical requirements. 



28 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

HISTOLOGY AND EMBRYOLOGY 

Professor McCrea and Associate Professor Provenza 

Histology, general and special dental, is given during the Freshman year 
and is presented by lectures and laboratory instruction. It embraces the 
thorough study of the cells, elementary tissues, and the organs of the various 
systems of the body. Special dental histology includes the gross and microscopic 
study of the oral cavity, teeth and their investing tissues. At all times correla- 
tions are made with the other phases of the curriculum. The use of fresh 
tissues in the laboratory is included to associate further the structure with 
function. 

The course in Embryology is given by means of lectures and laboratory 
classes. It covers the fundamentals of the development of the human body, 
particular emphasis being given to the head and facial regions, oral cavity and 
teeth with their surrounding structures. At all times emphasis is placed on the 
association of embryology to histology and anatomy. 

Students are trained in the proper use of the microscope and its accessories, 
and in staining, mounting and properly manipulating sections made for 
microscopic study. All sections are prepared for class. 



OPERATIVE DENTISTRY 

Professor Randolph; Associate Professors Medina and Scherr; Assistant Professors 

H. M. Clement, Louie and Ednwnd G. Vanden Boschc; Drs. Beaven, 

Bloom and C. J. Gavcr 

Operative Dentistry is the treatment of diseases and injuries of the teeth 
to restore the normal tooth forms and provide for the better health and function 
of the oral mechanism. The course of instruction is given during the Sopho- 
more, Junior and Senior years. 

In the Sophomore j'ear, the student is trained in the technical procedures 
in instrumentation, cavity preparation and manipulation of restorative mate- 
rials. The variables which must be observed in preparing cavities to receive 
different types of filling materials are carefully outlined. These modifications 
are carried out by the student in a series of cavity preparations made in composi- 
tion teeth, arranged in normal proximal relation on forms especially designed 
for the purpose. These fundamental principles are then applied to extracted 
teeth in order that the student might study the characteristic resistance of tooth 
structure to instrumentation. The management of gold foil, amalgam, gold inlay, 
silicate, acrylic, and cement is given in detail and the student restores the prepared 
cavities with these materials. This course of instruction consists of twenty-six lec- 
tures and forty-eight laboratory periods. Demonstration lectures, visual aids and 
conferences are used to augment the student's training. 

Operative Dentistry as taught in the Junior and Senior years is a con- 
tinuing development of the principles presented in the Sophomore year. The 
student is trained to render a satisfactory Oral Health service by restoring 
pathologic teeth to their normal form and function and to evaluate new pro- 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 29 

cedures suggested by experience and research as improvements in operative 
practice. These objectives are pursued through a combination of didactic and 
clinical instruction. 

The didactic instruction includes twenty-four one-hour lectures offered dur- 
ing the Junior year, and twenty-four lectures during the Senior year. The 
student is instructed in the treatment of the pathology of the hard tissues of 
the teeth; he is taught how to apply the principles of idealism to unorthodox 
conditions; and he is directed in the professional treatment of his patients in 
terms of what they expect of him and what he can expect of them. A certain 
amount of time is devoted to conferences which provide the student an oppor- 
tunity to bring his individual problems to the instructor for intimate discussion. 

Clinical instruction includes the practical application of the principles under- 
lying rational operative procedures. During the Junior and the Senior years 
the student treats the dental pathologies of several cases under the supervision 
of the Operative Instruction Staff. 

ORAL DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT PLANNING 

Professor Biddi.v ; Associate Professor Golton; Drs. Bryant, IV. L. Graham and Lebo 

The Department of Oral Diagnosis emphasizes the study of fundamental 
principles and procedures in the diagnosis of oral and related diseases. The 
Junior and Senior students, in seminar groups, receive instruction by intimate 
clinical observation and discussion of interesting cases. An intelligent and 
scientific approach to each case is the prime teaching principle of this depart- 
ment. 

Abundant clinic material is available so that the student may observe every 
type of disease to which the oral cavity is susceptible. Emphasis is placed upon 
the fact that one must approach a study of the oral cavity through an under- 
standing of its relationship to other parts of the body. To this end the depart- 
ment is singularly fortunate in having easy access for consultation with the 
medical service of the University Hospital. 

Treatment planning is given the great importance it deserves. Students 
are permitted to give their impressions of plans of treatment, which are care- 
fully discussed in this department. Consultations with other departments are 
always available so that the practice of thorough diagnosis is developed. 

Much time is given to the study of the relationship of mouth infection to 
systemic disease. The theory of local infection is emphasized and properly 
evaluated so that the student may interpret clinical, roentgenologic, and lab- 
oratory findings in an intelligent and competent manner. A large collection 
of color slides serves to make lectures in oral diagnosis interesting and 
instructive. 

ORAL MEDICINE 

ENDODONTICS 

Assistant Professors Riddington and Abramson 
This course consists of lectures, clinics and technic laboratory instruction. 



30 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

The lecture and laboratory procedures are given in the second semester of the 
Sophomore year. The lecture phase presents the indications and contraindica- 
tions for maintaining pulp-involved teeth and the various methods which may 
be used in performing all the necessary steps in root-canal therapy. 

The laboratory phase is designed to acquaint the student with the actual 
technic of performing root-canal therapy. This he accomplishes by carrying 
out the necessary procedures on extracted teeth. 

During the Junior and Senior years, the student applies the fundamentals 
he has learned previously by performing root-canal therapy on clinical cases, 
under supervision of the Endodontics Staff. 

ORAL HYGIENE 

Assistant Professors Biddington and liskoiv; Dr. T. P. Clement 

Oral Hygiene is taught by a combined lecture and laboratory course. 

Preventive dentistry is stressed in lectures. Emphasis is placed on the 
functions and limitations of dentifrices and mouth washes, toothbrushes, and 
brushing methods ; the role of diet in dental health and development ; and the 
relation of dental foci to systemic diseases. Causes, results, treatment and 
eradication of unhygienic conditions of the oral cavity are fully considered. 
Demonstrations are given in the prophylactic treatment and in the home care of 
the mouth, and in the methods of brushing teeth. 

The student is taught in laboratory the fundamental use of scalers upon 
special mannikins. By progressive exercises and drills he is carried through the 
basic principles of good operating procedure and is taught the methods of a 
thorough prophylactic treatment. The class is divided into two sections, one as 
operators, the other as patients, to perform the actual clinical prophylactic 
treatment. The sections are then alternated. 

PERIODONTICS 

Assistant Professors Biddington and Eskow; Dr. T. P. Clement 

The lecture course presents the etiology, clinical symptoms, diagnosis, 
prognosis, and methods of treatment of the various forms of periodontal disease, 
lesions of the lips, cheeks and tongue, and other, diseases of the oral cavity 
which do not require surgery. The recognition of periodontal disease in its 
incipient forms and the importance of early treatment are stressed. The various 
methods of treatment are considered and evaluated. 

The lectures are well illustrated with color slides and moving pictures. 
Demonstrations, using patients, are correlated with the lecture course to show 
conditions of actual practice. 

Infirmary practice is required of both Junior and Senior students. Individual 
cases are managed according to systematized procedure. Diagnosis is based on 
radiographs, clinical signs and symptoms, casts, history, and laboratory findings. 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 31 

ORAL ROENTGENOLOGY 

Associate Professor Dabrozvski and Dr. Gaffncy 

The advances made in dental science and in the art of practice have 
established Roentgenology as one of the most important departments of dental 
education. The course offered is based on the universal utility of the x-ray in 
oral diagnosis and is consistent with the modern concept of preventive dentistry. 

In the lectures are included a study of the physical principles involved in 
the production of Roentgen rays, a thorough discussion of their nature as to 
properties and effects, and the background of information necessary to their 
practical application. 

In the clinic, students of the Junior and Senior years are in constant asso- 
ciation with the routine practical use of the x-ray. They are required to master 
thoroughly the fundamental scientific principles thereof and to acquire a 
reasonable degree of technical skill, under supervision. It is the design of the 
course to equip students to take, process, and interpret all types of intraoral 
and extraoral films. Abundant clinical material is available as the result of a 
policy calling for the routine use of the x-ray in all oral diagnoses. 

ORAL SURGERY 

ORAL SURGERY 

Professors Dorsey, Robinson and Y eager; Associate Professor Cappuccio; Assistant 
Professor Siminski; Drs. Bushey, Flor, Heldrich, Hyson, Jarvis and Pozcga 

Oral Surgery is given in the Junior and Senior years and consists of lec- 
tures, clinical assignments, and practical demonstrations on the etiology, 
pathology, diagnosis and treatment of all classes of tumors, infections, deformi- 
ties, anomalies, impacted teeth, fractures and minor oral surgical conditions 
associated with the practice of dentistry. Special group hospital clinics, demon- 
strations and ward rounds are given to familiarize the student with abnormal 
conditions incident to the field of his future operations and to train him thor- 
oughly in the diagnosis of benign and malignant tumors. 

Weekly seminars are held in the hospital and each Senior student is re- 
quired to prepare and present an oral surgery case report according to the re- 
quirements of The American Board of Oral Surgery. 

Instruction is given in the classification of teeth for extraction, in the re- 
moval of teeth, and in the pre- and post-operative treatment of patients, both 
ambulatory and hospitalized. 

Students are required to produce anesthesia and to extract teeth under the 
direction and supervision of an instructor. 

Clinics are held to demonstrate the removal of impacted and imbedded teeth 
and cysts, and the treatment of fractures and other oral conditions requiring 
surgery. Abundant clinical material and adequate facilities enable the student 
to receive exceptional training and practice. 



32 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

ANESTHETICS 

Professors Dorsey and Dodd; Associate Professor Cappuccio; Dr. Inman 

Local anesthesia is taught both in principle and in practice. All types of 
intraoral, extraoral, conduction and infiltration injections; the anatomical rela- 
tionship of muscles and nerves; the theory of action of anesthetic agents, the 
dangers involved, and toxic manifestations and their treatment, are taught in 
lectures and clinics. Demonstrations are given in conduction and infiltration 
technics, and students are required to give similar injections under direct super- 
vision of the instructor. 

General anesthesia is taught in both lecture and clinic, including the action 
of the anesthetic agents, methods of administration, indications and contraindica- 
tions, dangers and the treatment of toxic manifestations. Demonstrations are 
given in the preparation of the patient, the administration of all general anes- 
thetics (inhalant, rectal, spinal, and intravenous), and the technic for oral 
operations, with clinics being held in the Infirmary and in the Hospital. 

ORAL AND WRITTEN EXPRESSION 

Professor Foley 

A formal course of lectures is given in the second year. Many aspects of 
the instruction are given practical application in the third and fourth years. The 
course has many purposes, all of them contributing to the training of the stu- 
dents for effective participation in the extra-practice activities of the profession. 
Particular attention is given to instruction in the functioning of the agencies 
of communication in dentistry: the dental societies and the dental periodicals. 
The practical phases of the course include a thorough study of the preparation 
and uses of oral and written composition by the dental student and the dentist; 
the use of libraries; the compilation of bibliographies; the collection, the organi- 
zation, and the use of information; the management of dental meetings; the 
oral presentation of papers; and professional correspondence. 



ORTHODONTICS 

Professor Preis; Assistant Professors Shehan and Swinehart; Drs. Cullen 

and Schaeffer 

The Orthodontics course consists of lectures, clinical observations, comprehensive 
diagnosis and therapy. The subject matter includes the history of orthodontics 
and the study of growth and development, the evolution of human dental oc- 
clusion, forces of occlusion, etiology of malocclusion, aberrations of the maxilla 
and mandible which affect occlusion, and tissue changes incident to tooth move- 
ment. 

Methods of orthodontic therapy are explained and demonstrated; students are 
provided the opportunity for assisting during the treatment of clinical patients. 

Lectures are given during both semesters of the Junior year. The Seniors are 
assigned to the orthodontic clinic. 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 33 

PATHOLOGY 

GENERAL PATHOLOGY 

Professor Aisenberg, Associate Professor Weinberg, Drs. A. D. Aisenberg, 

1'lor, (i ran ruth and Gucrin 

General Pathology is taught in the Sophomore year by means of lectures, 
demonstrations, quizzes and laboratory work. 

The general principles of disease processes and tissue reactions, both gross 
and microscopic, are taught with the objectives of training the student to 
recognize and be familiar with the abnormal and of creating a foundation for 
further study in the allied sciences. 

Emphasis is placed upon those diseases in the treatment of which medico- 
dental relationships are to be encountered. 

ORAL PATHOLOGY 

Professor Aisenberg and Drs. A. D. Aisenberg, Flor and Granruth 

Oral Pathology is taught in the first semester of the Junior year. It includes 
a study of the etiology, the gross and microscopic manifestations, and the correla- 
tion with the treatment of diseases of the teeth and their investing structures: 
namely, pathologic dentition, dental anomalies, periodontal diseases, tissue changes 
in orthodontic movement of teeth, calcific deposits, dental caries, pulpal diseases, 
focal infection, oral manifestations of systemic diseases, and benign and malignant 
lesions in and about the oral cavity. 

Instruction is presented by lectures, demonstrations, lantern slides, prepared 
slides, microscopic study of macroscopic specimens, models and moulages. 

PEDODONT1CS 

Associate Professors Sanders and Scherr; Dr. Ehrlich 

The course is designed to prepare the student to become competent in the 
practice of modern preventive and restorative dental services for the young patient. 
It consists of lectures, clinics and technic laboratory instruction in all phases of 
dentistry for children. 

Attention is given to the management of the child patient with necessary modifica- 
tions for behavior problems. Instruction is offered in the fundamentals required in 
the preparation of all cavities in the deciduous teeth for the proper reception of 
different filling materials. Methods and procedures indicated in the restoration of 
broken and fractured incisors in children are demonstrated in technic and utilized 
in the clinic. The indications and contraindications for pulpal therapy are evaluated 
for the purpose of rational tooth conservation. The problem of premature loss of 
the deciduous teeth is studied and the construction of space maintainers is demon- 
strated. 

Preventive dentistry is stressed. Prophylaxis, toothbrushing instruction and 
the routine use of radiographs are used for the introduction of the child patient to 
clinic procedures and for encouraging the student to establish complete treatment 



34 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

plans. The technics of caries susceptibility tests and their practical use are in- 
cluded, as well as the clinical approach to rational dietary studies. 

The Department endeavors to develop in the dental student a sincere interest 
in guiding the child patient through the period of the mixed dentition. A separate 
clinic equipped with child-size chairs and supervised by a special pedodontic staff 
provides adequate opportunity for clinical application of the methods presented in 
the lectures. 

PHARMACOLOGY 

PHARMACOLOGY AND THERAPEUTICS 

Professor Dobbs; Drs. Rapoport and Ross 

The course is designed to provide a general survey of pharmacology, affording 
the students the necessary knowledge for the practice of rational therapeutics. 

The course is taught throughout the Junior year by lectures, laboratories and 
demonstrations. The first semester consists of sixteen hours of didactic work in- 
cluding instruction in pharmaceutical chemistry, pharmacy, prescription writing, and 
the pharmacodynamics of the local-acting drugs. 

The second semester consists of thirty-two hours of didactic and forty-eight 
hours of laboratory instruction. The subject material consists of the pharmacody- 
namics of the systemic-acting drugs. 

In therapeutics the students are instructed in the use of drugs for the prevention, 
treatment, and correction of general and oral diseases. 

NUTRITIONAL THERAPEUTICS 

Professor Dobbs 

This course presented in the Senior year consists of sixteen hours of 
lectures and demonstrations devoted to the principles and practices of nutri- 
tional therapeutics. The presentation includes a study of the dietary require- 
ments of essential food substances in health and disease. The vitamin and 
mineral deficiency states with their pathology and symptomatology are pre- 
sented with suggestions for dietary and drug therapy. Metabolic diseases are 
discussed, and their effects on the nutritional states are considered. Diets are 
planned for patients with various nutritional problems, such as those resulting 
from loss of teeth, the use of new appliances, dental caries, stomatitis, cellulitis, 
osteomyelitis, and bone fractures. 

A project study is made by each student which includes analyses of his 
basal metabolic requirement, his total energy requirement, and his dietary intake 
in relation to his daily needs. 

ORAL THERAPEUTICS 

Professor Dobbs 

Oral therapeutics is presented in the Senior year and consists of sixteen 
hours of lectures and demonstrations. The course is designed to acquaint the 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 35 

students with the practical applications of pharmacology in the treatment of 
dental and oral diseases. Particular emphasis is given to the newer drugs and 
the more recent advances in therapeutics. Patients from the dental clinic and 
hospital will be used for demonstrations whenever possible. 

PHYSIOLOGY 

Professor Ostcr and Assistant Professors Pollack and Shipley 

The purpose of the course in Physiology is to equip the student of dentistry 
with a knowledge of the fundamental physiological functions of the human 
body. The basic physical and chemical properties and processes in living tissues 
and organisms are analyzed. 

The material of the lectures is divided into sections concerned with nerve 
and muscle functions, the central nervous system and its integrative role, 
respiration, digestion, metabolism, circulation, humoral control of function, 
water balance, kidney function, and the special senses. 

Laboratory work is given in the first semester. Simple experiments performed 
on frogs and turtles are followed by more advanced work on cats and dogs and on 
the students themselves. Principles illustrating the application of physiology to 
dentistry and medicine are given special attention. 

Throughout the course, emphasis is placed upon the experimental and 
objective approach to problems as the basis of the scientific method. Effort 
is made to present modern physiological developments and evaluate them in 
terms of their clinical significance. 

PRACTICE MANAGEMENT 

PROFESSIONAL ETHICS 

Dr. Lovett 

The course in Professional Ethics includes a series of lectures on the history 
of general ethics and its basic teachings, which is followed by an interpretation 
of philosophical principles in terms of a code of professional ethics and its 
application to the present-day needs of the dental profession. Emphasis is 
placed upon the importance of right conduct in the dentist's relations with the 
public, the dental profession, the patient, the physician, the dental specialist 
and the dentist in general practice. 

JURISPRUDENCE 
Mr. Pumptan 

The special aim in the course in Jurisprudence is to ground the student in 
the fundamentals of law as they relate themselves to the dentist and his patient. 
The rights and limitations of each are pointed out through lecture work and 
class conference. A series of practical cases in which suits have been threatened 
or entered by patients against the dentist will be reviewed in the light of trial 
table outcome or basis on which compromise adjustments have been made. 



34 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

plans. The technics of caries susceptibility tests and their practical use are in- 
cluded, as well as the clinical approach to rational dietary studies. 

The Department endeavors to develop in the dental student a sincere interest 
in guiding the child patient through the period of the mixed dentition. A separate 
clinic equipped with child-size chairs and supervised by a special pedodontic staff 
provides adequate opportunity for clinical application of the methods presented in 
the lectures. 

PHARMACOLOGY 

PHARMACOLOGY AND THERAPEUTICS 

Professor Dobbs; Drs. Rapoport and Ross 

The course is designed to provide a general survey of pharmacology, affording 
the students the necessary knowledge for the practice of rational therapeutics. 

The course is taught throughout the Junior year by lectures, laboratories and 
demonstrations. The first semester consists of sixteen hours of didactic work in- 
cluding instruction in pharmaceutical chemistry, pharmacy, prescription writing, and 
the pharmacodynamics of the local-acting drugs. 

The second semester consists of thirty-two hours of didactic and forty-eight 
hours of laboratory instruction. The subject material consists of the pharmacody- 
namics of the systemic-acting drugs. 

In therapeutics the students are instructed in the use of drugs for the prevention, 
treatment, and correction of general and oral diseases. 

NUTRITIONAL THERAPEUTICS 

Professor Dobbs 

This course presented in the Senior year consists of sixteen hours of 
lectures and demonstrations devoted to the principles and practices of nutri- 
tional therapeutics. The presentation includes a study of the dietary require- 
ments of essential food substances in health and disease. The vitamin and 
mineral deficiency states with their pathology and symptomatology are pre- 
sented with suggestions for dietary and drug therapy. Metabolic diseases are 
discussed, and their effects on the nutritional states are considered. Diets are 
planned for patients with various nutritional problems, such as those resulting 
from loss of teeth, the use of new appliances, dental caries, stomatitis, cellulitis, 
osteomyelitis, and bone fractures. 

A project study is made by each student which includes analyses of his 
basal metabolic requirement, his total energy requirement, and his dietary intake 
in relation to his daily needs. 

ORAL THERAPEUTICS 

Professor Dobbs 

Oral therapeutics is presented in the Senior year and consists of sixteen 
hours of lectures and demonstrations. The course is designed to acquaint the 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 35 

students with the practical applications of pharmacology in the treatment of 

dental and oral diseases. Particular emphasis is given to the newer drugs and 

the more recent advances in therapeutics. Patients from the dental clinic and 
hospital will be used for demonstrations whenever possible. 

PHYSIOLOGY 

Professor Osier and Assistant Professors Pollack and Shipley 

The purpose of the course in Physiology is to equip the student of dentistry 
with a knowledge of the fundamental physiological functions of the human 
body. The basic physical and chemical properties and processes in living tissues 
and organisms are analyzed. 

The material of the lectures is divided into sections concerned with nerve 
and muscle functions, the central nervous system and its integrative role, 
respiration, digestion, metabolism, circulation, humoral control of function, 
water balance, kidney function, and the special senses. 

Laboratory work is given in the first semester. Simple experiments performed 
on frogs and turtles are followed by more advanced work on cats and dogs and on 
the students themselves. Principles illustrating the application of physiology to 
dentistry and medicine are given special attention. 

Throughout the course, emphasis is placed upon the experimental and 
objective approach to problems as the basis of the scientific method. Effort 
is made to present modern physiological developments and evaluate them in 
terms of their clinical significance. 

PRACTICE MANAGEMENT 

PROFESSIONAL ETHICS 

Dr. Lovett 

The course in Professional Ethics includes a series of lectures on the history 
of general ethics and its basic teachings, which is followed by an interpretation 
of philosophical principles in terms of a code of professional ethics and its 
application to the present-day needs of the dental profession. Emphasis is 
placed upon the importance of right conduct in the dentist's relations with the 
public, the dental profession, the patient, the physician, the dental specialist 
and the dentist in general practice. 

JURISPRUDENCE 

Mr. Pumpian 

The special aim in the course in Jurisprudence is to ground the student in 
the fundamentals of law as they relate themselves to the dentist and his patient. 
The rights and limitations of each are pointed out through lecture work and 
class conference. A series of practical cases in which suits have been threatened 
or entered by patients against the dentist will be reviewed in the light of trial 
table outcome or basis on which compromise adjustments have been made. 



36 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

PRACTICE ADMINISTRATION 

Professor Biddix 

The chief objective of this course is to prepare the students to assume 
intelligently the social, economic and professional responsibilities of dental 
practice. The training in practice management is a continuous growth with 
the student during his entire clinical experience. 

In preparation for the course the students are given introductory lectures 
and demonstrations relative to the conduct of practice at the beginning of their 
Junior year when they come into the clinics for formal practice training. The 
training they receive in handling patients, keeping records, etc., serves as an 
introduction to the problems they will experience in practice. 

The formal Senior lectures stress the selection of the proper office location 
and the purchase of office equipment, the manner of reception and handling 
of patients, the basis of fixing fees, the methods of collecting accounts, the 
choice of various types of insurance and of sound investments. A comprehensive 
bookkeeping system for a dental office is fully outlined and explained. 



PREVENTIVE AND PUBLIC HEALTH 
DENTISTRY 

Dr. Leonard 

The objectives of this course are to emphasize those measures other than 
remedial operations that will tend to minimize the occurrence or the extension 
of oral pathology, and to outline the status of dentistry in the field of general 
public health. The relationships of dentistry with other phases of public health 
are discussed, as are the problems affecting the administration of dental health 
programs. Special effort is made to demonstrate methods and materials suitable 
for use in dental health education programs. 



PRINCIPLES OF MEDICINE 

Associate Professor McLean and Dr. Kuehn 

Principles of Medicine is taught by lecture, visual education, and clinical 
demonstrations. The course is given to the Junior and Senior classes for one 
hour a week during the entire year. The course is supplemented by comprehen- 
sive lectures in Physical Diagnosis given to the Senior class during the second 
semester. 

The purpose of the course is to give the dental student a general under- 
standing of medical problems, especially of diagnostic and therapeutic proce- 
dures, and to show the close relationship between oral diseases and general 
systemic disturbances. 

In the Junior year, the course is largely didactic, and the signs and symptoms 
of the more common diseases are discussed. In the Senior year, importance is 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 37 

placed on the close application of medical and dental knowledge, with the emphasis 
on organic and psychosomatic diseases; these diseases are presented at medical 
clinics and seminars in the University Hospital. 

Throughout the year small groups of students are taken into the Hospital for 
medical ward rounds and demonstrations. 

This department cooperates with the instruction procedures of the oral diagnosis 
clinic by discussing and demonstrating the medical aspects of cases presented. 

Available clinical material is used and free discussion is encouraged, in order 
to correlate the art of practice in history taking, diagnosis, laboratory examinations, 
and the modern concepts of treatment. 

Guest lecturers present specific scientific papers relating to medical-dental topics. 

VISUAL AIDS IN TEACHING 

Associate Professor Schueler; Mrs. A. J. Proutt, Miss Sakalusky and Mr. Taylor 

Visual aids are essential to instruction in all the courses of the dental cur- 
riculum. From his first class to his graduation day the student's learning is 
assisted by the use of visual materials. 

Through photography the School retains for teaching purposes many inter- 
esting cases that appear in the clinics, preserves evidence of unusual pathological 
cases, and records anatomical anomalies, facial disharmonies and malocclusions 
of the teeth. In addition the student, through his contacts with photographic 
uses, becomes acquainted with the value of photography in clinical practice. 
Undergraduates are advised as to the use of visual aids in the preparation of 
lectures and theses, the arrangement and co-ordination of materials, and the 
organization and maintenance of records and histories. 

Moulage and art are used to supplement the photographic services where 
applicable. Drawings of anatomical, pathological, surgical and operative cases 
are used to teach the student detailed technics. In moulage, rubber master 
molds are made of gross and embryological specimens and from these are cast 
plaster, rubber, and wax positives. Through the use of agar molds, facial and 
oral masks are made of unusual and interesting clinical subjects. This work is 
particularly valuable in courses in which it is not possible to use actual specimens 
for instructional purposes. 

Ry the combination and correlation of these various types of visual aids, 
all departments in the School are provided with an unlimited supply of valuable 
and often irreplaceable materials for lectures, clinics and exhibits. 

SPECIAL COURSES 

SUMMER COURSES 
As the need arises, summer courses are offered in any of the subjects 
included in the regular curriculum. For details concerning each course consult 
pages 24-37 in this catalog. A charge of $10.00 for each semester hour credit 
is made for these courses. 



38 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

GRADUATE COURSES 
Graduate courses are offered by the departments of Anatomy, Histolog) 
and Embryology, Bacteriology, Biochemistry, Physiology, Oral Pathology and 
Oral Surgery. For descriptions of these courses, consult the catalogue of the 
University of Maryland Graduate School. The tuition fees for these courses 
are the same as those at College Park. 

POSTGRADUATE COURSES 

Postgraduate courses are offered to qualified dental graduates. These 
courses are designed to provide opportunities for study in special fields on a 
refresher level, and are arranged so that particular emphasis is placed on 
clinical practices. 

Anatomy of the Head and Neck 

This course is designed to review certain principles of Anatomy and to 
furnish the student opportunities to relate these principles to clinical practice. 
Instruction is presented in the form of illustrated lectures, seminars, and lab- 
oratory dissection. One semester, full time. Tuition, $200.00. Maximum expense 
for books, supplies, and equipment, $45.00. 

Oral Pathology 

The course in Oral Pathology is presented with the objective of correlating 
a knowledge of histopathology with the various aspects of clinical practice. The 
physiology of the periodontal attachment and the pathology of the dental pulp, 
the periodontium, the hard tissues of the teeth, odontogenic cysts and tumors, 
and cancer in and about the oral cavity are stressed. Studies o f surgical and 
biopsy specimens are also emphasized. Opportunity for supervised research in 
areas of particular interest to the student will be available. One year, full time. 
Tuition, $550.00. Maximum expense for books, supplies, and equipment, $75.00, 
which includes microscope fee of $25.00. 

Oral Surgery 

The course in Oral Surgery is organized to train the dentist in advanced 
surgical procedures of the oral cavity and the associated parts. Although 
primarily designed for the general practitioner, the course can be used as credit 
toward specialization in Oral Surgery. One year, full time. Tuition, $550.00. 
Maximum expense for books, supplies, and equipment, $75.00. 

Periodontia 

The course in Periodontia consists of a review of the etiology, pathology, 
clinical symptoms, diagnosis and methods of treatment of the various types 
of periodontal disease. Instruction is presented by means of lectures, seminars 
and clinical demonstration. One semester, full time. Tuition, $200.00. Maximum 
expense for books, supplies, and equipment, $75.00. 

Prosthesis 

Instruction will be given in the fundamental principles and factors involved 
in complete denture prosthesis, the general problems in diagnosis and treatment 
planning, and the procedures of constructing partial and complete dentures. 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 39 

Ample opportunity will be provided for the application of the basic principles 
and procedures of clinical practice. One semester, full time. Tuition, $200.00. 
Maximum expense for books, supplies, and equipment, $300.00. 



Visual Aids 

The basic principles and practices of Visual Aids are presented by lecture, 
demonstration and laboratory technics. Practical photography and moulage are 
featured, with instruction in department organization and exhibition arrangement. 
Four weeks, full time. Tuition $150.00. 



Occasional Part-Time Courses 

The fees charged part-time students who may be enrolled in any of the 
special courses are prorated on a basis of the full-time charge of $550.00, with 
a minimum charge of $100.00 for any one course. 



THE GORGAS ODONTOLOGICAL SOCIETY 

The Gorgas Odontological Society was organized in 1916 as an honorary 
student dental society with scholarship as a basis for admission. The Society 
was named after Dr. Ferdinand J. S. Gorgas, a pioneer in dental education, a 
teacher of many years' experience, and during his life a great contributor to 
dental literature. It was with the idea of perpetuating his name that the Society 
adopted it. 

To be eligible for membership a student must be in the first 30 per cent of 
his class. The selection of this 30 per cent shall be based on the weighted 
percentage average system as outlined in the school regulations. The meetings, 
held once each month, are addressed by prominent dental and medical men, an 
effort being made to obtain speakers not connected with the University. The 
members have an opportunity, even while students, to hear men associated with 
other educational institutions. 



OMICRON KAPPA UPSILON 

Phi Chapter of Omicron Kappa Upsilon honorary dental society was 
chartered at the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, University 
of Maryland during the session of 1928-29. Membership in the society is 
awarded to a number not exceeding 12 per cent of the graduating class. This 
honor is conferred upon students who through their professional course of study 
creditably fulfill all obligations as students, and whose conduct, earnestness, 
evidence of good character and high scholarship recommend them to election. 



NOTE: Enquiries concerning these courses should be addressed to the Dean of the 

Kt-ntai School, rjniversity of Maryland, Baltimore l. Maryland. 



40 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

The following graduates of the 1955 Class were elected to membership: 

Victor Lee Andrews, Jr. Raymond Charles Dilzer 

Thomas Earl Blumenbach Richard Warren Hungerford 

Richard Everett Bolyard Edward Jay Meredith, Jr. 

Lawrence Ira Brant Peter R. Reiner 

William Packer Brodie Howard S. Tarabour 

William John Curtis Hans Richard Wilhelmseist 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

The first annual meeting of the Society of the Alumni of the Baltimore 
College of Dental Surgery was held in Baltimore, March 1, 1849. This organi- 
zation has continued in existence to the present, its name having been changed 
to The National Alumni Association of the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, 
Dental School, University of Maryland. 

The officers of the Alumni Association for 1955-1956 are as follows : 

Lawrence W. Bimestefer Gerard A. Devlin 

President P resident-Elect 

1 Kinship Road 121 Prospect Street 

Baltimore 22, Maryland Westfield, New Jersey 

Daniel E. Shehan 

Vice-President 
Medical Arts Building 
Baltimore 1, Maryland 

Joseph M. Tighe Howard Van Natta 
Secretary Treasurer 

6601 York Road Medical Arts Building 

Baltimore 12, Maryland Baltimore 1, Maryland 

Ethelbert Lovett Gerson A. Freedman 

Historian Editor 

Medical Arts Building 5901 Park Heights Avenue 

Baltimore 1, Maryland Baltimore 15, Maryland 



Representatives to University Alumni Council 

Lawrence W. Bimestefer, 1956 Gerard A. Devlin, 1957 

1 Kinship Road 121 Prospect Street 

Baltimore 22, Maryland Westfield, New Jersey 

Harry Levin, 1958 

3429 Park Heights Avenue 

Baltimore 15, Maryland 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 



41 



Executive Council 

Max K. Raklor. 1958 

Chairman 
Medical Arts Building 
Baltimore 1, Maryland 



Benjamin A. Browx, 1956 

2701 Pacific Avenue 
Atlantic City, New Jersey 

Edwix G. Gail, 1957 
3700 N. Charles Street 
Baltimore 18, Maryland 

Eugene L. Pessagxo, Jr., 1958 
Medical Arts Building 
Baltimore 1, Maryland 



James L. Trone, Sr., 1956 
127 E. Main Street 
Elkton, Maryland 

Howard B. Wood, 1957 

19 S. Liberty Street 
( umberland, Maryland 

Joiix T. Staxg, 1958 
1007 Frederick Avenue 
Baltimore 28, Maryland 



Trustees for National Alumni Fund 

Trustees Ex-Officio 

Lawrexce W. Bimestefer, President 

Gerard A. Devlix, P resident-Elect 

Arthur I. Bell, Secretary-Treasurer 

Max K. Baklor, Chairman of Executive Council 

Myron S. Aisexberg, Dean 



Harry Levix. 1956 
3429 Park Heights Avenue 
Baltimore 15, Maryland 

Elmer F. Corey, 1957 

1901 E. 31st Street 
Baltimore 18, Maryland 

Augustixe L. Cavallaro, 1958 

291 Whitney Avenue 

New Haven 11, Connecticut 



Michael B. Messore, 1956 
807 Union Trust Building 
Providence, Rhode Island 

Meyer Eggxatz, 1957 

420 Lincoln Road 
Miami Beach, Florida 

Irvix B. Golboro, 1958 
143 E. North Avenue 
Baltimore 2, Maryland 



42' 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



GRADUATING CLASS 
1954-1955 Session 



Carlos Eladio Alfaro Castillo 

El Salvador, C. A. 
Victor Lee Andrews, Jr.... North Carolina 
Arnold Peter Arseneaux. .. .Massachusetts 

Simon J. Balchun, Jr Pennsylvania 

Daniel Bartell Maryland 

Harold Robert Beecher .Connecticut 

Alfred Edwin Bees Maryland 

Thomas Earl Blumenbach Florida 

Richard Everett Bolyard. . . . West Virginia 

George Lawrence Bozzi Connecticut 

Lawrence Ira Brant Florida 

Hunter Ashton Brinker, Jr Maryland 

William Packer Brodie Florida 

Don-Neil Brotman Maryland 

James Carroll Bulger Connecticut 

Robert Clyde Burroughs, Jr. 

North Carolina 

Jerome David Buxbaum Maryland 

Robert Carrel Pennsylvania 

Harold Gordon Cheney, Jr Illinois 

William Dennis Chester Maryland 

Thomas Austin Clary New York 

Lawrence Alvin Clopper, Jr Maryland 

Edward Vincent Comulada Maryland 

William Robert Cotton Florida 

William John Curtis Arizona 

Raymond Charles Dilzer New Jersey 

Bernard David Eisenberg Maryland 

Robert Heistand Enterline .... Pennsylvania 

Charles Richard Farley West Virginia 

Henry William Feindt Maryland 

Arnold Samuel Feldman Maryland 

Mark Lawrence Fine New Jersey 

Norman Earl Solon Gale New Jersey 

John Robert Gallant Maine 

Burton Malcolm Greifer Rhode Island 

Robert Devine Hanley Rhode Island 

Robert Luers Heldrich Maryland 

Sheldon Holen Maryland 

Philip K. Humphreys California 

Richard Warren Hungerford. . . .Connecticut 

Leonard Hale Jarvis. Jr West Virginia 

Drexel Marion Johnston, Jr... West Virginia 
James Frederick Kast, Jr.... West Virginia 

Arnold John Kaye Massachusetts 

Harris Jordan Kohn Maryland 

Nicholas Kohut Poland 

Garey Louis Kostens Maryland 

Eli John LaFreniere Rhode Island 

Ronald Murray Lauer New Jersey 

Thaddeus Francis Lenick New Jersey 

James Anthony Liszewski Maryland 



Wallace David Loo New York 

Robert Kwock Tong Look Hawaii 

Joseph Anthony Lucia New York 

Hervey Arthur Lupien Rhode Island 

John Francis Lynch Maine 

Stanley Macklin Maryland 

Donald Francis Marshall New York 

William Forrest Martin, Jr Maryland 

James Taylor McCarl Maryland 

James Lewis McMillan Mississippi 

Donald Eugene McShane Maryland 

Edward Jay Meredith, Jr Pennsylvania 

Jules Millman Maryland 

Paul Joseph Minehart West Virginia 

Oscar Noroian Massachusetts 

Mary Emma Pate Maryland 

George John Pepper Pennsylvania 

Mitchel Pozega West Virginia 

William Morgan Reed Delaware 

Francis Joseph Reeves Maryland 

Peter Raymond Reiner Florida 

George Daniel Resh, Jr Maryland 

Thomas Earl Ridgeway Arizona 

Luis Alipio Roman Puerto Rico 

Graydon Lee Schreiber Maryland 

Joseph Henry Seipp, Jr Maryland 

Paul Arthur Shapiro Connecticut 

Stanley Raymond Sheft New Jersey 

Harold Lee Silber New Jersey 

Raymond Marvin Simon New Jersey 

Signey Sidney Snyder Maryland 

John Robert Spencer North Carolina 

James Bailey Stewart Florida 

Howard Sylvan Tarabour New Jersey 

Roberto Guy Tassinari Massachusetts 

Martin Taubenfeld Maryland 

Richard Swanson Thornton Florida 

Luis Toro-Albarracin Puerto Rico 

Pasquale Alexander Varanelli. . Connecticut 

William Henry Vinall West Virginia 

Aldona Yizbaraite Germany 

Thomas Elmer Wagner Maryland 

Walton Wayne Weigand. District of Columbia 

Robert Leon Wiener New York 

Hans Richard Wilhelmsen Maryland 

Joseph Francis Williams Connecticut 

Robert Paul Williams Florida 

Edgar Cecil Wilson West Virginia 

John Frederick Wilson West Virginia 

Charles Wissler Virginia 

Nelson Austin Wright, Jr Maryland 

Albert William Zanner, Jr., 

District of Columbia 



HONORS 

Summa Cum Laude 
Peter Raymond Reiner 
Magna Cum Laude 



Victor Lee Andrews, Jr. 
Thomas Earl Blumenbach 



Richard Everett Bolyard 
Raymond Charles Dilzer 
Howard Sylvan Tarabour 



Edward Jay Meredith, 
Cum Laude 



Jr. 



Hans Richard Wilhelmsen 
William John Curtis 



William Packer Brodie 

Richard Warren Hungerford 

Lawrence Ira Brant 



DEGREE CONFERRED JULY 31, 1954 

Robert Franklin Mantz, Jr. 
Mississippi 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 43 

SENIOR PRIZE AWARDS 

The following prizes were awarded to members of the Senior Class for the 
1954-1955 Session: 

The Alexander H. Paterson Memorial Medal 

For Practical Set of Full Upper and Loivcr Dentures 

Luis Alipio Roman 
Honorable Mention Francis Joseph Reeves 

The Isaac H. Davis Memorial Medal 

(Contributed by Dr. Leonard I. Davis) 

For Cohesive Gold Filling 

Peter Raymond Reiner 
Honorable Mention Eli John LaFreniere 

The Alumni Association Medal 
For Thesis 

Jerome David Buxbaum 

Harris Jordan Kohn 

(Collaboration) 

Honorable Mention Arnold John Kaye and Howard Sylvan Tarabour 

(Collaboration) 

The Harry E. Kelsey Award 

(Contributed by former associates of Dr. Kelsey: Drs. Anderson, 
Devlin, Hodges, Johnston and Preis) 

For Professional Demeanor 

William Packer Brodie 

The Harry E. Latcham Memorial Medal 

For Complete Oral Operative Restoration 

Hunter Ashton Brinker, Jr. 
Honorable Mention Mark Lawrence Fine 

The Edgar J. Jacques Memorial Award 

For Meritorious Work in Practical Oral Surgery 

Arnold Peter Arseneaux 

The Herbert Friedberg Memorial Award 

(Contributed by the New Jersey Alumni Chapter of the 
National Alumni Association) 

For Achievement by a New Jersey Senior 

Raymond Charles Dilzer 



44 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

REGISTER OF STUDENTS 

1955-1956 Session 



Graduate 



Richard W. Binger, B.S Tennessee 

Harold H. Bryant, B.S., M.S.. Florida 

Roger H. Davidheiser, B.S., M.S. 



Pennsylvania 
M.S.. .Montana 
D.D.S. 

Maryland 
Herbert Halpenny James, Jr., A.B., M.S. 

Montana 



Paul William Haubrick, A.B., 
Robert Luers Heldrich, A.B. 



Leonard Hale Jarvis, A.B., D.D.S. 

West Virginia 
Charles Brown Leonard, B.S.. .New Jersey 

Zenas A. McDonald, A.B Georgia 

Mitchel Pozega, A.B., D.D.S... West Virginia 

Leah Miller Proutt. B.S, M.S Maryland 

Matthew J. Rehak, B.S Maryland 

Frank Joseph Sinnreich, Jr., B.S. . .Maryland 



Senior Class 



Robert James Agresti, B.A. ...New Jersey 
The Catholic University of America 

Herbert Hidesuke Akamine, B.S Hawaii 

University of Hawaii 

Waverley Conway Artz, B.A Mississippi 

University of Mississippi 

Robert Vincent Bates Maryland 

Denison University 
Edward Jerome Becker, B.S. 

District of Columbia 
University of Maryland 

Robert John Belliveau, B.S New Jersey 

Seton Hall University 

Kenneth Edward Bertram, B.S.. . .Maryland 

Syracuse University 

Henry Joseph Bianco, Jr Maryland 

Loyola College 

Mario Bonanti, B.A Pennsylvania 

Gannon College 

Frederick Thomas Brennan, B.A Maine 

University of Maine 

Stanley Louis Brown, BS Maryland 

University of Maryland 

Morton Alfred Brownstein Virginia 

College of William and Mary 

Bernard Busch, A.B New Jersey 

Tulane University of Louisiana 

Robert Roscoe Callahan, B.S Florida 

University of Georgia 

Anthony Alain Caputi Rhode Island 

University of Vermont 

Aaron Jacob Chmar Maryland 

University of Maryland 

Bernie Odell Coberly, Jr., B.S Maryland 

University of Maryland 

Donald Eugene Cone Maryland 

Washington Missionary College 

Frederick Earl Connelly Massachusetts 

Bowdoin College 

Joseph Anthony Corbo, B.A. ..New Jersey 

Saint Peter's College 



Victor Benjamin Costa New Jersey 

University of Miami 
Michael Alexander Costrino, B.A. 

Massachusetts 
Boston University 

Donald LeRoy Cramer Delaware 

University of Delaware 

Remo Angelo DelRosso Massachusetts 

St. Anselm's College 

David Arthur Denisch Maryland 

University of Maryland 

William Frank Evans, Jr., A. A Florida 

University of Florida 

Francis Xavier Falivene, B.S. . .New Jersey 

Seton Hall University 

Andrew Federico New Jersey 

Rutgers University 

Fred Seymour Fink, B.A Maryland 

University of Delaware 

Michael Edward Fleming, B.S. . . . New York 

St. Bernardine of Siena College 

Jack Lester Frasher South Carolina 

Furman University 

Marvin Lewis Friedman, B. A.. . Connecticut 

University of Connecticut 

Robert Albert Gagne, B.S Connecticut 

University of Maryland 
Charles Joseph Galiardi, B.S. .. .Maryland 

University of Maryland 
Francis Eugene Gassiraro, B.A. 

Massachusetts 
Boston College 

Marvin Bennett Golberg, B.S Maryland 

University of Maryland 

Stanley Barry Goldberg. B.A Maryland 

The Johns Hopkins University 
Herbert William Grambow, Jr., B.S. 

Maryland 
University of Maryland 

Herald Donald Green, B.S Pennsylvania 

University of Pittsburgh 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 



45 



Armand Shelby Hall Maryland 

Washington and Lee University 

Alfred Hamel, B.S Rhode Island 

Providence College 
Albert Edward Heimert. Ill, B.S. 

Maryland 
University of Maryland 
Leonard George Henschel 

District of Columbia 
University of Maryland 

Gene Caryl Hose West Virginia 

West Virginia University 
Blaine Ellsworth Jarrett, B.A. 

West Virginia 
West Virginia University 
Jerome Philip Jermain. Jr., B.S. 

Connecticut 
St. Michael's College 

Ralph Stuart Johnson Utah 

University of Utah 

Albert Andrew Kapsak Pennsylvania 

Mt. St. Mary's College 

Paul Samuel Keller, B.A Maryland 

Gettysburg College 

Edward MeCauley Kelly Maryland 

Loyola College 

Ralph Lawrence Kercheval. . .West Virginia 

West Virginia University 

Thomas Frederick Kern Connecticut 

Mt St. Mary's College 

Francis Joseph Kihn, B.S Maryland 

Loyola College 

Norman Dale Kisamore Maryland 

University of Maryland 
Eugene Francis Kobylarz, B.S. 

New Jersey 
Lebanon Valley College 
Jerome Boris Krachman, B.A. 

New Jersey 
University of Buffalo 

Robert Leo LaFon, B.A West Virginia 

West Virginia University 

Vernon A. Lake South Carolina 

Presbyterian College 

Stuart LaKind New Jersey 

Seton Hall University 

Charles Edward Landry ... .Massachusetts 

St. Anselm's College 

Peter Joseph Lapolla Rhode Island 

Providence College 

Kendrick Roger Lawrence, B.A. . .Vermont 

University of Vermont 

Jules Joseph Levin, B.A Maryland 

Western Maryland College 

Walter Joseph Lucas, Jr. . . . North Carolina 

Belmont Abbey College 

Philip Dennis Marano Maryland 

Loyola College 



Clayton Swearingen McCarl, B.S. . .Maryland 

University of Maryland 
Carlton Joseph McLeod, B.A. 

Rhode Island 
Brown University 
Francis Xavier McNulty. . .Massachusetts 
St. Anselm's College 

Harry Leroy Mertz, Jr Maryland 

Gettysburg College 

Steven Jay Miller, B.A New Jersey 

Rutgers University 

Dale Roger Moss West Virginia 

University of South Carolina 

Robert Paul Murphy, B.A Maryland 

Loyola College 
George Herman Nieske, B.A. 

Massachusetts 
American International College 

James Philip Norris, B.S Maryland 

University of Maryland 
Christopher James O'Connell, Jr., B.S. 

Massachusetts 
College of the Holy Cross 

Ferdinand Frank Pagano New Jersey 

Niagara University 
Raymond Walter Palmer, Jr., B.S. 

Maryland 
University of Maryland 

Robert Dickey Parker West Virginia 

Morris Harvey College 

Thomas Henry Paterniti, B.S. . .New Jersey 

Seton Hall University 

Donald Pivnick Connecticut 

University of Connecticut 
Jose Ramon Prieto-Hernandez, 

B.S Puerto Rico 

University of Puerto Rico 

Charles Allen Ridgeway Arizona 

Phoenix College 

Vernon Delaney Rodeffer Pennsylvania 

Catawba College 

Laurence Ray Rollins West Virginia 

Marshall College 

Paul Leon Roxin Maryland 

University of Maryland 
Edward Thomas Ryan, III, B.A. 

Massachusetts 
American International College 

Richard Andrew Saal Maryland 

Loyola College 

Eugene Marcellus Sadd West Virginia 

Xavier University 

Herbert Otto Scharpf New Jersey 

Tufts College 
Charles August Schlegel, Jr. .. Connecticut 

Providence College 

Arthur Seymour Schuster, B.S. .. .Maryland 

University of Maryland 



46 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Caesar Michael Silvestro New Jersey 

New York University 

AJlie Skib, B.S Massachusetts 

St. Michael's College 

Irby Garrion Sorrells, B.S Maryland 

Berry College 

Jack Haldane Soutar Florida 

University of Florida 
Lloyd Ernest Svennevig, A.B. 

Massachusetts 
Atlantic Union College 

Warren Edward Thurston, B.S Maine 

University of Maryland 

Joseph Harry Toropilo Connecticut 

University of Maryland 

Harold Michael Trepp, B. A. . . . Connecticut 

The Catholic University of America 



Gilbert Roland Tronier Utah 

University of Utah 
Donald Collis Weikert, B.S. 

District of Columbia 
University of Maryland 

Daniel Fowler Whiteside Florida 

University of Florida 

Anthony John Wickenheiser, Jr. ... Maryland 

University of Maryland 

Robert James Wilson Maryland 

Western Maryland College 

Byron Crosby Woodside Virginia 

The George Washington University 

George Dietrich Yent, Jr Maryland 

Virginia Polytechnic Institute 

Gilbert Garland Youngblood. .West Virginia 

West Virginia University 



Junior Class 



Norman Stanley Alpher 

District of Columbia 
The George Washington University 

William Milton Barbush West Virginia 

West Virginia University 
Robert Lehman Bartlett, B.A.. . .Maryland 

The Johns Hopkins University 
Eugene Arthur Beliveau, B.S 

Massachusetts 
Boston College 

Daniel Willis Benton Utah 

University of Utah 

William Frederick Bishop, B.S.. . .Maryland 

University of Maryland 

John Frederick Black New Jersey 

Fairleigh Dickinson College 

Louis Blum Pennsylvania 

The Newark Colleges of 
Rutgers University 

Charles Daniel Broe Massachusetts 

Tufts College 

William George Buchanan New Jersey 

University of Maryland 
Vito Dominic Buonomano, Jr., B.S. 

Rhode Island 
Providence College 

James Ambrose Butler, Jr New York 

Niagara University 

Charles Wallis Buttner Florida 

University of Miami 

Richard Ernest Cabana New Jersey 

Seton Hall University 

Hubert Thomas Chandler. . . .West Virginia 

Morris Harvey College 

Robert Lee Childs, B.A Pennsylvania 

Duquesne University 

Neil Cohen Florida 

University of Miami 

William Eugene Colliver Maryland 

University of Maryland 
Joseph Andre Croteau. B.S. 

Massachusetts 
College of the Holy Cross 

Bertrand Saul Dann, B.S., M.S Maryland 

University of Maryland 



Urban Bernard DeCosta, B.S. 

Rhode Island 

Providence College 

Frederick Bertrand Delorme. .. .Vermont 

University of Vermont and 

State Agricultural College 

John Joseph DeMartin Connecticut 

University of Vermont and 
State Agricultural College 

Robert Edward DeMartin Connecticut 

University of Vermont and 

State Agricultural College 

John Henry Dempsey, A.B... West Virginia 

West Virginia University 

Elliott Howard Dickler, B.S Maryland 

University of Maryland 
Seymour Bernard Fingerhood, B.A. 

New Jersey 
New York University 

Karl Josef Foose West Virginia 

Marshall College 

William Grady Franklin, B.S Maryland 

University of Maryland 

Paul Edward Freed Maryland 

University of Maryland 
Joseph Patrick Garvey, B.S. 

Rhode Island 
College of the Holy Cross 

Roy Frank Gherardi, B.A New York 

New York University 

George William Greco Maryland 

Mount St. Mary's College 

Ray Evan Griffin, B.A Vermont 

University of Vermont and 
State Agricultural College 

Jimmy Ray Hager West Virginia 

West Virginia University 

Walter Burnell Hall, A.B Massachusetts 

Cornell University 

Raymond Donald Haslam Pennsylvania 

Washington Missionary College 

Paul Emmet Higgins Maryland 

University of Maryland 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 



47 






Orville Clayton Hurst. .7r Maryland 

University of Maryland 

Thomas Kent Ingram Virginia 

Virginia Military Institute 

Gerald Marshall Isbell Maryland 

University of Maryland 

William McDonald Johnson Florida 

Berea College 

Livia Kalnins Latvia 

The Johns Hopkins University, 
McCoy College 

William Ignatius Keene New Jersey 

Mt. Saint Mary's College 

John Poist Keffer. Jr New Jersey 

Villanova College 

James Van Lieu Kiser West Virginia 

Davis and Elkins College 

Fred Herman Andrew Koeniger 

New York 
The University of Rochester 

William Edgar Landefeld, Jr., B.A. 

Maryland 
Western Maryland College 

Kenneth Joseph Langfield. .Massachusetts 
University of Massachusetts 

George Albert Lippard, Jr., B.S. 

South Carolina 
Davidson College 

Donald Bruce Lurie Maryland 

Western Maryland College 

John Joseph Martielli, B.S Florida 

Davis and Elkins College 

Dennis Laurent Maud. B.A. ....New York 

Norwich University 

Jerry Wayne Medlock. B.S Texas 

Presbyterian College 
Ernest Charles Merkel, Jr.. B.S. . .Maryland 

University of Maryland 
Eugene Joseph Messer, A.B. 

Massachusetts 
St. Michael's College 

Joe Harvey Miller, Jr Maryland 

University of Maryland 
John Charles Miller, Jr. 

District of Columbia 
University of Maryland 

Ralph Charles Monroe Maine 

University of Maine 

John George Mueller, B.A Oklahoma 

Duke University 
Raymond Elliot Mullaney, B.S. 

Massachusetts 
University of Maryland 

Nassif Joseph Nassif West Virginia 

West Virginia University 

Minor Paul Nestor, B.S Maryland 

University of Maryland 

Philip Patrick Nolan, B.S Maryland 

Loyola College 

Thomas Francis Owens Pennsylvania 

The Pennsylvania State College 
Rafael Angel Pagan- Colon, B.S. 

Puerto Rico 
University of Puerto Riro 
Roy Christopher Page, A.B. 

South Carolina 
Berea College 
Orie Nicholas Passarelli, B.S..New Jersey 

Saint Peter's College 
William Russell Patteson. . . . West Virginia 

Marshall College 

Peter Pecoraro. Jr., B.S. ...Rhode Island 

Providence College 



John Vincent Puleo, B.A Rhode Island 

1 'rovidence College 

Alfred Joseph Rapuano New Jersey 

The Newark Colleges of 
Rutgers University 

Clyde Eugene Reed. BiS West Virginia 

West Virginia University 

Angelo Michael Repole New Jersey 

University of Maryland 

William Henry Ruppert, Jr Maryland 

University of Maryland 
Charles Benjamin Rushford, Jr., A.B. 

West Virginia 
West Virginia University 

Herbert Henry Rust New York 

Queens College 

Francis John Salvato, A.B New Jersey 

Gettysburg College 

Alvin Robert Sayers Vermont 

Midwestern University 

Abraham Schachter, B.A Connecticut 

The University of Connecticut 

Albert Seymore Schaffer Maryland 

University of Maryland 

Paul Kenneth Schick Connecticut 

Tufts College 

Robert Jay Schwartz Connecticut 

Emory University 

Harry Edwin Semler, Jr., B.A. .. .Maryland 

The Johns Hopkins University 

Joseph Israel Shevenell, B.S Maine 

St. Michael's College 

Carl S. Singer, B.S .Maryland 

University of Maryland 

Elwood Stanley Snyder, Jr New Jersey 

Middlebury College 

John Francis Spychalski, B.S. ...New York 

St. Bernardine of Siena College 

Robert John Stag Maryland 

University of Maryland 
Thomas Dcdds Stokes, Jr., B.A. 

North Carolina 
The University of North Carolina 

Alan Stoler Florida 

University of Miami 

William Andrew Stout. B.S New York 

Tufts College 

John Malcomb Stribling Florida 

University of Florida 

James Richard Sullivan Maryland 

Montgomery Junior College 

Carl Anthony Tomosivitch, B.S. .New York 

St. John's University 

Joel Jacob Ulanet New Jersey 

Lafayette College 
John David Vachon, A.B., M.S. 

West Virginia 
West Virginia University 

John William Vargo West Virginia 

Morris Harvey College 

Hans Kvamme Varmer, B.A Maryland 

Washington Missionary College 

Frank Joseph Verdecchia, B.S. .. .Maryland 

University of Maryland 

Richard Howard Warren New Jersey 

New York University 

George William Waxter Maryland 

University of Maryland 

Frederick Brown Williams. .South Carolina 

The Citadel 

Gerald Zimmerman, B.A New Jersey 

Dartmouth College 



48 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Sophomore Class 



Ralph Richard Asadourian, 

B A New Hampshire 

University of New Hampshire 

Ronald James Bauerle, B. A. .Connecticut 

Providence College 

Carl Mitchell Baumann Florida 

University of Florida 

Philip Stanley Benzil, B.S Florida 

University of Miami 

Thomas Henry Birney, B.A California 

University of Southern California 

Stanley Earle Block Maryland 

University of Maryland 

Joseph Paul Bodo, Jr., B.S Florida 

University of Tampa 

Stanley Saul Brager, B.S Maryland 

University of Maryland 

Harry Edward Brandau, Jr Maryland 

University of Maryland 

Robert Sherman Brown New Jersey 

University of Pennsylvania 

John Paul Burton West Virginia 

West Virginia University 

Enrique Rafael Capo Puerto Rico 

Haverford College 

Robert Ernest Chait Florida 

University of Miami 

Argil Lewis Chambers West Virginia 

Marshall College 

George Elmore Collins Maryland 

University of Maryland 

Martin Richard Crytzer, 

3 g Pennsylvania 

University of Maryland 

Stanley Carl DelTufo, B.A New Jersey 

Rutgers University 

William Clinton Denison West Virginia 

West Virginia University 

F. Lee Eggnatz Florida 

University of Florida 

Melvin Feiler New Jersey 

Upsala College 

Dayton Carroll Ford West Virginia 

Marshall College 

Orton Dittmar Frisbie Florida 

University of Florida 

Jose Antonio Fuentes Puerto Rico 

University of Puerto Rico 
John W. Gannon, Jr., 

A.B West Virginia 

West Virginia University 

Richard Chris Georgiades Florida 

Virginia Military Institute 



Robert Goren, B.S Maryland 

University of Maryland 
Barbara Lorraine Greco, 

A.B New Jersey 

The Newark Colleges of 
Rutgers University 

Anton Grobani, B.S Maryland 

University of Maryland 

Fernando Haddock, B.S Puerto Rico 

University of Puerto Rico 

Robert William Haroth Maryland 

University of Maryland 

Barry Ronald Harris Maryland 

University of Maryland 
Richard McFern Hemphill, 

A.B West Virginia 

West Virginia University 
Gerald Franklin Hoffman, 

B.A Connecticut 

University of Connecticut 

Paul Harvey Hyland Delaware 

University of Delaware 

William Louis Hyman Florida 

University of Miami 

Allen Burton Itkin Connecticut 

University of Connecticut 

Lawrence Paul Jacobs, A.B. .. .Delaware 

Temple University 

Alfred Howard Jansen, Jr Maryland 

University of Maryland 

Robert Mathis Johnson, B.A Maryland 

The Johns Hopkins University 

Paul Franklin Kiefman, B.S Virginia 

The American University 
Robert Harmon McLIoyd Killpack, 

B.A Utah 

University of Utah 

Anthony Joseph Klein, Jr., B.S..New York 

University of Cincinnati 

Richard John Lauttman, B.S Maryland 

Loyola College 

David Rodman Lecrone Delaware 

University of Delaware 

Walter Prudden Leonard Florida 

Emory University 

John Frank Lessig Maryland 

University of Maryland 

Herbert Gary Levin Maryland 

University of Maryland 

Donald Palmer Lewis Massachusetts 

Norwich University 
Robert Bernard Lewis, B.S.. Rhode Island 

College of the Holy Cross 

Benedict Salvatore LiPira, B.S. . .Maryland 

University of Maryland 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 



49 



Garrett Isaac "Lous. Jr.. A- B. . .Maryland 
West Virginia University 

Luis Felipe Lucca, B.S Puerto Rico 

University of Puerto Rico 
Albert Silveira Luiz, A. B. .Massachusetts 

Boston University 

Lawford Earle Magruder. Jr ... .Maryland 

University of Maryland 

Clyde Danforth Marlow Florida 

Emory University 

Carlos Rafael Matos Puerto Rico 

University of Puerto Rico 
Edward Robert McLaughlin, 

B.S Massachusetts 

University of Massachusetts 

David Frederick Mehlisch Maryland 

Graceland College 
Raymond Dennis Menton, Jr., 

B.S Maryland 

Loyola College 

Anthony Nicholas Micelotti, B.S. 

Massachusetts 
Boston College 

Paul Masashi Morita New Jersey 

University of Maryland 

Richard Warren Moss Florida 

Emory University 

James Edward Nadeau Massachusetts 

American International College 
William Harold Neilund, B.S. .. .Maryland 

University of Maryland 
Ralph Fields Norwood, Jr. . .West Virginia 

Bethany College 
Guy Sullivan O'Brien, Jr., 

B.S South Carolina 

Furman University 

Charles Irving Osraan, B.S Florida 

University of Florida 
Warren Andrew Parker ... .New Jersey 

Mount Saint Mary's College 

Bienvenido Perez, Jr., B.S....New York 

University of Puerto Rico 

George Louis Plassnig Maryland 

University of Maryland 

Joseph Marion Powell South Carolina 

Furman University 

Ralph Weyman Price Virginia 

North Georgia College 

Burton Alvin Raphael Maryland 

University of Maryland 

Alan Shia Resnek Massachusetts 

Tufts College 

Henry Edward Richter, Jr., B.S. .Virginia 

University of Maryland 

Lawrence David Rogers Maryland 

University of Maryland 



Peter Arthur Rubelman Florida 

Emory University 

John Sidney Rushton Virginia 

University of Maryland 

Robert Nicholas Santangelo. .New Jersey 

Purdue University 

Lawrence Donald Sarubin, B.S. .Maryland 

University of Maryland 

James Augustus Schaefer, B.S..New York 

St. Michael's College 

Leonard Stanley Schneider Maryland 

The Johns Hopkins University 

Howard Schwartz, B.A New Jersey 

Rutgers University 

Irwin Bernard Schwartz New Jersey 

The Newark Colleges of 
Rutgers University 

David Howard Shamer, B.S Maryland 

University of Maryland 

Charles Irvine Shelton West Virginia 

West Virginia University 
Cyril Stanton Sokale, B.A. .. .Connecticut 

The University of Connecticut 
Edward William Spinelli, Jr., 

A.B Massachusetts 

Tufts College 

Howard Stanton Spurrier Utah 

University of Utah 

Ivan Lee Starr, A.B New Jersey 

Syracuse University 

Ronald Martin Starr Maryland 

University of Maryland 

Elizabeth Lee Stewart.. Maryland 

The Johns Hopkins University, 
McCoy College 

Marvin Howard Tawes, Jr Maryland 

University of Maryland 
Linn Shecut Tompkins, Jr.. South Carolina 

University of South Carolina 

Frank Trotto, Jr., A. B.... West Virginia 

West Virginia University 

Donald Herbert Wadsworth Florida 

Emory University 

James Ray Wampler Virginia 

Richmond College, 
University of Richmond 

William James Washuta Florida 

University of Miami 

David Allen Watson Maryland 

University of Maryland 

Louis Weiss Maryland 

University of Maryland 

William Alvin Wolf, A.B Connecticut 

Upsala College 

Rodger August Zelles, B.S....Nevi Jersey 

Rutgers University 



50 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Freshman Class 



Kenneth David Bass, B.A., M.S. 

Connecticut 
University of Connecticut 
Robert Gene Beckelheimer . . . West Virginia 
Concord College 

Frederick Blumenthal Florida 

The University of Miami 
Leonard Francis Borges, B.S. 

Massachusetts 
Tufts College 

Martin David Breckstein Florida 

University of Florida 
Lawrence Austin Brehne, B.A..New Jersey 

Rutgers University 
Robert Francis Bristol, B. A.. Rhode Island 

Providence College 

John C. L. Brown, Jr., B.S. . .Pennsylvania 

The Pennyslvania State University 

Bayard Allen Buchen Florida 

Emory University 

Robert Rolland Buckner Georgia 

Washington Missionary College 

Barbara Dorothea Bucko Connecticut 

Syracuse University 

Thomas Cali, B.S New Jersey 

University of Maryland 

John Joseph Cartisano New York 

Indiana University 

Gary Herbert Cohen Maryland 

University of Maryland 

Robert Ted Conner West Virginia 

West Virginia University 
Henry Donald Crowley, B.A. ....New York 

Duke University 
Juan Anibal Cuevas -Jimenez, B.S. 

Puerto Rico 
University of Puerto Rico 
Adolph Albert Cura, B. A.. . .Massachusetts 

Boston College 

Peter Bernard Dal Pozzol. .. .Connecticut 

Colby College 

Allan Lee Danoff Maryland 

University of Maryland 

Eugene Frederick deLonge. .South Carolina 

Newberry College 

Joseph Budding Dietz, Jr Delaware 

Lehigh University 
Frank Anthony Dolle, B.S., M.S., Ph.D 

Maryland 
University of Maryland 
William Frank Dombrowski, B.S.. .Maryland 

United States Naval Academy 
James Francis Dooley, B.S., A.B. 

New Jersey 
B.S., U. S. Merchant Marine Academy 
A.B., Rutgers University 

William Edward Dowden, B.S New York 

Niagara University 

Ronald Wolfe Feldstein, B.S Maryland 

Franklin and Marshall College 

Conrad Castenzio Ferlita Florida 

The University of Miami 

Raymond Alan Flanders New York 

Colgate University 

John Morrison Foley, B.S Maryland 

Loyola College 

James Arthur Fowler, Jr Maryland 

University of Maryland 

Robert Donald Fraser, B.S New York 

Niagara University 

Richard Lawrence Fraze Florida 

Tufts College 

Larry Joe Frick South Carolina 

The Clemson Agricultural College 



Thornwell Jacobs Frick, B.S. 

South Carolina 
Davidson College 

Ivan Orlo Gardner, B.S Maryland 

University of Pittsburgh 

Billy Wade Gaskill Arkansas 

West Virginia University 

Gorm Pultz Hansen Maryland 

University of Maryland 

Frederick Lewis Hodous Maryland 

University of Maryland 

Francis Kurt Hugelineyer, B.S....New York 

College of the Holy Cross 

Eugene Farley Humphreys Idaho 

Brigham Young University 

James Paul Jabbour, B.S.. . .Massachusetts 

Tufts College 

Calvin Charles Kay Florida 

University of Miami 

Edward Gerard Keen Connecticut 

St. Anselm's College 

Paul Lewis Keener Maryland 

University of Maryland 

Joseph Krall, B.S Maryland 

University of Maryland 

Jacob Ian Krampf Maryland 

University of Maryland 

Frank Walter Krause, B.A New Jersey 

University of Virginia 

Domenic Edward LaPorta Connecticut 

University of Maryland 

Robert Louis Lee Maryland 

University of Maryland 

Wallace George Lee Michigan 

University of Maryland 

Lester Leonard Levin Maryland 

University of Maryland 
Leslie Herminio Lopez-Velez, B.S. 

Puerto Rico 
University of Puerto Rico 

Joseph Paul Lynch, B.S New Jersey 

Seton Hall University 

Carlos A. Machuca Padin, B.S.. .Puerto Rico 

University of Puerto Rico 

Arnold Irwin Malhmood Maryland 

University of Maryland 

Jose Manuel Martinez, B.S Puerto Rico 

University of Puerto Rico 

John Kenneth McDonald Mississippi 

Louisiana State University and 
Agricultural and Mechanical College 

Thomas James Meakem New Jersey 

Davis and Elkins College 

Thomas Eugene Miller, B.S New Jersey 

St. John's University 

Bernard Lee Morgan, B.A. ...West Virginia 

West Virginia University 

Fabian Morgan, B.S North Carolina 

Wake Forest College 

John Worthington Myers Maryland 

Hagerstown Junior College 
Elizabeth Haydee Noa, B.A. .. .Puerto Rico 

Nazareth College 
William Barnard O'Connor. . . .West Virginia 

West Virginia University 

William Robert Owens, B.S. .North Carolina 

Davidson College 

Philip Kibbee Parsons West Virginia 

West Virginia University 
Jeffry Chandler Pennington 

South Carolina 
The Citadel 
Charles Kenneth Peters, Jr., B.S. 

Maryland 
Loyola College 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 



51 



Gregory Michael Petrakis, B.S. 

Connecticut 
Trinity College 
George Jackson Phillips, Jr., B.A. 

Maryland 
Amherst College 

Barry Pickus, B.A Maryland 

Western Maryland College 

Donald Alan Pirie. B.S Maryland 

University of Maryland 
Anthony Michael Policastro, B.A. 

New Jersey 
Seton Hall University 

Joseph Eul Polino, B.A Connecticut 

Providence College 

Alben R. Pollack, B.A New York 

Alfred University 

Joel Pollack. B.S New York 

The City College of New York 
Albert Edward Postal. .District of Columbia 

University of Maryland 

William Lewis Pralley, B.A. ..West Virginia 

West Virginia University 

John Viering Raese West Virginia 

West Virginia University 

William Paul Raimond Maryland 

University of Maryland 

Harold Reuben Ribakow Maryland 

University of Maryland 
Chester James Richmond, Jr.. .Connecticut 

Tufts College 
Matthew Angelo Rocco, B.A....New Jersey 

Seton Hall University 
Everett Newton Roush, III.. West Virginia 

Marshall College 

Louis Joseph Ruland, Jr., B.A. .. .Maryland 

The Johns Hopkins University 

Raymond Richard Sahley West Virginia 

Marshall College 

Charles Salerno New Jersey 

Upsala College 

Richard Charles Saville, B.A Maryland 

University of Maryland 

David Lee Schofield Florida 

University of Miami 



Jerome Schwartz, B.S Maryland 

University of Maryland 

Robert Bernard Silberstein Florida 

University of Florida 
Stanley Leonard Silver, B.S. 

District of Columbia 
University of Maryland 
Francis Vincent Simansky, B.S. .. .Maryland 
Loyola College 

Orlando Louis Skaff, B.A West Virginia 

West Virginia University 

Philip Smith Vermont 

University of Vermont and State 
Agricultural College 

Anthony Sollazzo New Jersey 

Rutgers University 

James Frederick Sproul Ohio 

West Virginia University 

John Joseph Stecher, B.S New Jersey 

Seton Hall University 

Donald Dietrich Stegman, B.S Maryland 

University of Maryland 
Daniel Joseph Sullivan, B.A. ..Rhode Island 

Providence College 

Charles Carroll Swoope, Jr.. . .New Jersey 

University of Florida 

Arthur Morton Tilles Maryland 

University of Maryland 

John Louis Varanelli Connecticut 

University of Connecticut 
Francis Anthony Veltre, B.S., M.S. 

Maryland 
University of Maryland 

Jorge Vendrell Puerto Rico 

The Tulane University of Louisiana 

Leonard Clifford Warner, Jr. .. .Connecticut 

Colby College 

Edgar Clair White Kentucky 

Marshall College 

Thomas Adams Wilson, B.A Maryland 

Amherst College 
Herbert Sanford Yampolsky. B.S. 

New Jersey 
University of Alabama 



DEANS OF DENTAL SCHOOLS IN BALTIMORE 



BALTIMORE COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 
(Founded 1840) 

Chapin A. Harris 1840—1841 

Thomas E. Bond 1841—1842 

Washington R. Handy. 1842—1853 

Philip H. Austen 1853—1865 

Ferdinand J. S. Gorg as 1865 — 1882 

Richard B. Winder 1882—1894 

M. Whilldin Foster ._ 1894—1914 

William G. Foster 1914—1923 

MARYLAND DENTAL COLLEGE 

1873—1878 (Merged with B. C. D. S.) 

Richard B. Winder 1873—1878 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
(Founded 1882) 

Ferdinand J. S. Gorgas 1882 — 1911 

Timothy O. Heatwole 1911—1923 

BALTIMORE MEDICAL COLLEGE 
1895—1913 (Merged with U. of Md.) 

J. William Smith 1895—1901 

William A. Montell 1901—1903 

J. Edgar Orrison 1903—1904 

J. William Smith 1904—1913 

BALTIMORE COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 

DENTAL SCHOOL 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

(B. C. D. S. Joined the U. of Md. 1923) 

Timothy O. Heatwole 1923—1924 

J. Ben Robinson 1924—1953 

Myron S. Aisenberg (Acting) 1953 

Myron S. Aisenberg 1954 — present 



1957-1958 




NIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



THE SCHOOL OF 



dentistry 



AT BALTIMORE 




1957 1958 


JANUARY 1957 


JULY 1957 


JANUARY 1958 


JULY 1958 


S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 2G 
27 28 29 30 31 


S M T W T F S 
.... 12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 


S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 .... 


S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 


FEBRUARY 


AUGUST 


FEBRUARY 


AUGUST 


S M T W T F S 
1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 

24 25 26 27 28 

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


S M T W T F S 
12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


S M T W T F S 

1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 .... 


S M T W T F S 
1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


MARCH 


SEPTEMBER 


MARCH 


SEPTEMBER 


S M T W T F S 
1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 


S M T W T F S 

1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 


S M T W T F S 
... 12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 


APRIL 


OCTOBER 


APRIL 


OCTOBER 


S M T W T F S 
.... 12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 


S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 


S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 


S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 .... 


MAY 


NOVEMBER 


MAY 


NOVEMBER 


S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


S M T W T F S 
1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


S M T W T F S 

12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


S M T W T F S 

1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 


JUNE 


DECEMBER 


JUNE 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F S 

1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 


S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 31 


S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 


S M T W T F S 
.... 12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 




BOARD OF REGENTS 
AND 
MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE Term 

Expires 
Charles P. McCormick, Sr., Chairman, McCormick and Company, Inc., 

414 Light Street, Baltimore 2 „ 1957 

Edward F. Holter, Vice-Chairman, The National Grange, 744 Jackson 

Place, N.W., Washington 6 m 1959 

B. Herbert Brown, Secretary, The Baltimore Institute, 12 West 
Madison Street, Baltimore 1 - 1960 

Harry H. Nuttle, Treasurer, Denton 1957 

Louis L. Kaplan, Assistant Secretary, 1201 Eutaw Place, Baltimore 17 1961 

Edmund S. Burke, Assistant Treasurer, Kelly-Springfield Tire Com- 
pany, Cumberland - 1959 

William P. Cole, Jr., 100 West University Parkway, Baltimore 10 1958 

Thomas W. Pangborn, The Pangborn Corporation, Pangborn Blvd., 

Hagerstown - „....„ 1965 

Enos S. Stockbridge, 10 Light Street, Baltimore 2 _ 1960 

Thomas B. Symons, Suburban Trust Company, 6950 Carroll Avenue, 

Takoma Park „ 1963 

C. Ewing Tuttle, 907 Latrobe Building, Charles and Read Streets, 

Baltimore 2 1962 

Members of the Board are appointed by the Governor of the State for 
terms of nine years each, beginning the first Monday in June. 

The President of the University of Maryland is, by law, Executive Officer 
of the Board. 

The State law provides that the Board of Regents of the University of 
Maryland shall constitute the Maryland State Board of Agriculture. 

A regular meeting "of the Board is held the last Friday in each month, 
except during the months of July and August. • ■ 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTEENTH CATALOGUE 

with 

Announcements For 
The 7957-7958 Session 




BALTIMORE COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 

DENTAL SCHOOL 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 



THE PROVISIONS of this publication are not to be regarded as an 
irrevocable contract between the student and the University of Maryland. 
The University reserves the right to change any provision or require- 
ment at any time within the student's term of residence. The University 
further reserves the right at any time, to ask a student to withdraw when it 
considers such action to be in the best interests of the University. 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 
1957-1958 SESSION 

First Semester 

1957 

September 18 Wednesday *Registration for Freshman Class 

September 19 Thursday *Registration for Sophomore Class. 

September 20 Friday * Registration for Junior and Senior 

Classes. 

September 23 Monday Instruction begins with first sched- 
uled period. 

November 26 Tuesday Thanksgiving recess begins at close 

of last scheduled period. 

December 2 Monday Instruction resumes with first 

scheduled period. 

December 20 Friday Christmas recess begins at close 

of last scheduled period. 

1958 

January 6 Monday Instruction resumes with first 

scheduled period. 

January 23 Thursday and 

and 24 Friday * Second Semester Registration. 

January 31 Friday First Semester ends at the close 

of last scheduled period. 

Second Semester 

February 3 Monday Instruction begins with first sched- 
uled period. 

February 22 Saturday Washington's Birthday — holiday. 

April 3 Thursday Easter recess begins at close of 

last scheduled period. 

April 8 Tuesday Instruction resumes with first 

scheduled period. 

May 30 Friday Memorial Day — holiday. 

June 4 Wednesday Second Semester ends at close of 

last scheduled period. 

June 7 Saturday Commencement. 



* A student who fails to register prior to or on the day or days specified must pay 
a late registration fee of five dollars ($5.00). The last day of registration with fee 
added to regular charges is Saturday of the week in which instruction begins. 

The offices of the registrar and comptroller are open daily from 9 :00 A.M. to 
4 :00 P.M., and Saturday from 9 :00 A.M. to 12 :00 noon. 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 5 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Wilson Homer Elkins, B.A., M.A., B.Litt., D.Phil., 

President of the University 

Myron S. Aisenberg, D.D.S., Dean 

Katharine Toomey, Administrative Assistant 

G. Watson Algire, B.A., M.S., Director of Admissions and Registrations 

Norma J. Azlein, B.A., Registrar 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

1956-1957 SESSION 

Emeriti 

J. Ben Robinson, D.D.S., D.Sc, Dean Emeritus 
Burt B. Ide, D.D.S., Professor Emeritus of Operative Dentistry 

Professors 

Myron S. Aisenberg, Professor of Pathology. 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1922. 
Joseph Calton Biddix, Jr., Professor of Oral Diagnosis. 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1934. 
Edward C. Dobbs, Professor of Pharmacology and Therapeutics. 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1929 ; B.S\, 1952. 
Brice Marden Dorsey, Professor of Oral Surgery. 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1927. 
Gardner Patrick Henry Foley, Professor of Dental Literature. 

B.A., Clark University, 1923 ; M.A., 1926. 
Grayson Wilbur Gaver, Professor of Dental Prosthesis. 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1922. 
William Edward Hahn, Professor of Anatomy. 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1931: A.B., University of Rochester, 1938; M.S., 

1939. 
Marion W. McCrea, Professor of Histology and Embryology. 

D.D.S.. Ohio State University, 1935 : M.S'., University of Rochester, 1937. 
Ernest B. Nuttall, Professor of Fixed Partial Prosthesis. 

D.D.S.. University of Maryland, 1931. 

Robert Harold Oster, Professor of Physiology. 

B.S.. The Pennsylvania State University, 1923 ; M.S., 1926 ; Ph.D., Harvard Uni- 
versity, 1933. 
Kyrle W. Preis, Professor of Orthodontics. 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1929. 
Kenneth Vincent Randolph, Professor of Operative Dentistry. 

D.D.S*., University of Maryland, 1939 ; B.S., 1951. 
Donald E. Shay, Professor of Bacteriology. 

B.S.. Lebanon Valley College, 1937 ; M.S., University of Maryland, 1938 ; Ph.D., 

1943. 
E. G. Vanden Bosche, Professor of Biochemistry. 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1922; M.S., University of Maryland, 1924; Ph.D., 

1927. 



6 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Associate Professors 

William Robert Biddington, Associate Professor of Oral Medicine. 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1948. 
Joseph Patrick Cappuccio, Associate Professor of Oral Surgery. 

B.S., University of Rhode Island, 1943; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1946. 
Benjamin Anthony Dabrowski, Associate Professor of Oral Roentgenology. 

A.B., The Johns Hopkins University, 1932 ; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1940. 
Stanley H. Dosh, Associate Professor of Fixed Partial Prosthesis. 

D.D.S\, University of Maryland, 1935. 
♦Harold Golton, Associate Professor of Oral Diagnosis. 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1925. 
George McLean, Associate Professor of Physical Diagnosis and Principles of 
Medicine. 

M.D., University of Maryland, 1916. 
Peter McLean Lu, Associate Professor of Fixed Partial Prosthesis. 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1934. 

Jose Enrique Medina, Associate Professor of Operative Dentistry. 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1948. 
Walter L. Oggesen, Associate Professor of Fixed Partial Prosthesis. 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1926. 
D. Vincent Provenza, Associate Professor of Histology and Embryology. 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1939 ; M.S., 1941 ; Ph.D., 1952. 
Wilbur Owen Ramsey, Associate Professor of Dental Prosthesis. 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1943. 
Douglas John Sanders, Associate Professor of Pedodontics. 

B.S\, Northwestern University, 1946 ; D.D.S., 1948. 
Guy Paul Thompson, Associate Professor of Anatomy. 

A.B., West Virginia University, 1923 ; A.M., 1929. 
L. Edward Warner, Associate Professor of Dental Prosthesis. 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1931. 
Tobias Weinberg, Associate Professor of Pathology. 

A.B., The Johns Hopkins University, 1930 ; M.D., 1933. 

Assistant Professors 

Irving I. Abramson, Assistant Professor of Oral Medicine. 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1932. 
Alvin David Aisenberg, Assistant Professor of Pathology. 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1945. 
Hugh M. Clement, Jr., Assistant Professor of Operative Dentistry. 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1944. 
Thomas F. Clement, Assistant Professor of Oral Medicine. 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1951. 
Conrad L. Inman, Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology. 

D.D.S., Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, 1915. 
William Kress, Assistant Professor of Orthodontics. ' 

D.D.S*., University of Maryland, 1936. 
Yam-hin Louie, Assistant Professor of Operative Dentistry. 

B.S., Lingnan University, Canton, China, 1938 ; D.D.S., Northwestern University, 

1945 ; M.S.D., 1946. 



* Leave of absence. 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 7 

Burton Robert Pollack, Assistant Professor of Physiology. 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1946. 

Daniel Edward Shehan, Assistant Professor of Orthodontics. 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1922. 

E. Roderick Shipley, Assistant Professor of Physiology. 

A.B., The Johns Hopkins University, 1938 ; M.D., University of Maryland, 1942. 
Arthur G. Siwinski, Assistant Professor of Oral Surgery. 

A.B., The Johns Hopkins University, 1927 ; M.D., University of Maryland, 1931. 
Dr. Robert Swinehart, Assistant Professor of Orthodontics. 

A.B., Dartmouth College, 1933 ; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1937. 
Edmond G. Vanden Bosche, Assistant Professor of Dental Anatomy. 

B.S., The Pennsylvania State University, 1943 ; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 

1947. 

Special Lecturers 

Martin Helrich, Professor of Anesthesiology (School of Medicine). 

B.S., Dickinson College, 1946 ; M.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1946. 
Richard Lindenberg, Lecturer in Neuroanatomy. 

M.D., University of Berlin, 1944. 
Ethelbert Lovett, Lecturer in Ethics. 

D.D.S., Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, 1922. 
Wiluam J. O'Donnell, Lecturer in Jurisprudence. 

A.B., Loyola College, 1937 ; LL.B., University of Maryland, 1941. 
Harry M. Robinson, Jr., Professor of Dermatology (School of Medicine). 

B.S., University of Maryland. 1931 ; M.D., 1935. 

F. Noel Smith, Lecturer in Dental Prosthesis. 

D.D.S., Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, 1923. 
George Herschel Yeager, Professor of Clinical Surgery (School of Medicine). 
B.S., West Virginia University. 1927 ; M.D., University of Maryland, 1929. 

Instructors 

Sterrett P. Beaven, Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1941. 
Stanley L. Brown, Instructor in Pharmacology and Therapeutics. 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1952 ; D.D.S., 1956. 
Samuel Hollinger Bryant, Instructor in Oral Diagnosis. 

A.B., Western Maryland College, 1928 ; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1932. 
Arthur Merrick Bushey, Instructor in Oral Surgery. 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1950. 
Jerome S. Cullen, Instructor in Clinical Orthodontics. 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1941. 
Feed Ehrlich, Instructor in Pedodontics. 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1947. 

Calvin Joseph Gaver, Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 

B.S*., University of Maryland, 1950 ; D.D.S., 1954. 
Stanley B. Goldberg, Instructor in Roentgenology. 

B.A., The Johns Hopkins University. 1949 ; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1956. 
Ralph Jack Gordon, Instructor in Dental Prosthesis. 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1933. 
Marvin M. Graham, Instructor in Fixed Partial Prosthesis. 

A.B.. Cornell University. 1938 ; A.M., 1939 ; D.D.S., University of Pennsylvania, 

1943. 






8 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

William Lee Graham, Instructor in Oral Diagnosis. 

B.S., Marietta College, 1948; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1953. 
Walter Granruth, Jr., Instructor in Pathology. 

B.S., Loyola College, 1950 ; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1954. 
Melvin John Jagielski, Instructor in Dental Anatomy. 

D.D.S 1 ., University of Maryland, 1953. 
Frank G. Kuehn, Instructor in Clinical Medicine. 

A.B., University of North Carolina, 1946 ; M.D., University of Maryland, 1950. 
Eugene A. Leatherman, Instructor in Oral Surgery. 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1954. 
Lester Lebo, Instructor in Oral Diagnosis. 

B.S., University of Chicago, 1938 ; M.D., 1941. 
Richard R. C. Leonard, Instructor in Public Health Dentistry. 

D.D.S., Indiana University, 1922; M.S.P.H., University of Michigan, 1944. 
Charles E. Loveman, Instructor in Anatomy. 

A.B., The Johns Hopkins University, 1935 ; D.D.S., Columbia University, 1939. 
Martin H. Morris, Instructor in Biochemistry. 

B.S., Rutgers University, 1952 ; M.S., 1954. 
James P. Norris, Instructor in Oral Medicine. 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1950 ; D.D.S., 1956. 
Frank N. Ogden, Instructor in First Aid and in Charge of Medical Care of 
Students. 

M.D., University of Maryland, 1917. 
Victor S. Primrose, Instructor in Full Denture Prosthesis. 

D.D.S., McGill University, 1918. 
Norton Morris Ross, Instructor in Pharmacology. 

B.S., University of Connecticut, 1949 ; D.D.S.. University of Maryland, 1954. 

Myron Hillard Sachs, Instructor in Anatomy. 

D.D.S., Columbia University, 1939. 
Aaron Schaeffer, Instructor in Clinical Orthodontics. 

B.A., Western Maryland College, 1939 ; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1947 ; 

M.S., University of Illinois, 1948. 
Frank J. Sinnreich, Jr., Instructor in Anatomy. 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1951. 
Allie Skib, Instructor in Roentgenology. 

B.S., Sf. Michael's College, 1952; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1956. 
Glenn D. Steele, Instructor in Fixed Partial Prosthesis. 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1942. 
Claude P. Taylor, Instructor in Visual Aids. 
Earle Harris Watson, Instructor in Dental Materials and Dental Prosthesis. 

A.B., University of North Carolina, 1938; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1942. 
John T. Welch, Instructor in Pedodontics. 

A.B., West Virginia University, 1949 ; D.D.S., 1954. 

Graduate Assistants 

Jack A. Graham, Graduate Assistant in Oral Pathology. 

A.A., S'cranton Keystone Junior College, 1949 ; B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1950 ; 

D.D.S., 1954. 
Herbert W. Grambow, Graduate Assistant in Oral Surgery. 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1953 ; D.D.S., 1956. 
Charles Brown Leonard, Jr., Graduate Assistant in Biochemistry. 

B.A., Rutgers College of South Jersey, 1955. 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 9 

Robert D. Parker, Graduate Assistant in Oral Surgery. 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1956. 
Donald E. Staker, Graduate Assistant in Oral Surgery. 

B.S., Marshall College. 1950 : D.D.S.. University of Maryland, 1954. 
Victor J. Vilk, Graduate Assistant in Bacteriology. 

B.A.. Montana State University. 1951 : M.A.. 1954. 

Library Staff 

Ida Marian Robinson, Librarian and Associate Professor of Library Science. 
A.B., Cornell University. 1924 : B.S.L.S.. Columbia University School of Library 
Service, 1944. 

Hilda E. Moore, Associate Librarian. 

A.B., Randolph Maeon Woman's College, 1936 : A.B.L.S.. Ecuory University Library 
School, 1937. 

Beatrice Marriott, Reference Librarian. 
A.B., University of Maryland, 1944. 

Edith M. Coyle, Periodicals Librarian. 

A.B., University of North Carolina, 1937 ; A.B.L.S 1 ., University of North Caro- 
lina Sfchool of Library Science. 1939 ; M. A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1945. 

Harriette W. Shelton, Chief Cataloguer. 

B.A., The Pennsylvania State College, 1935 : B.S.L.S.. Columbia University School 
of Library Service, 1937. 

Marjorie Fluck, Cataloguer. 

B.S. in Ed., Kutztown State Teachers College, 1952. 

Rosalie C. Caroll, Library Assistant. 

Elizabeth E. McCoach, Assistant to the Librarian. 

Patricia C. Terzi, Assistant to the Cataloguer. 






10 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

HISTORY 

The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery occupies an important and 
interesting place in the history of dentistry. At the end of the regular ses- 
sion — 1955-56 — it completed its one hundred and sixteenth year of service 
to dental education. The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery represents the 
first effort in history to offer institutional dental education to those antici- 
pating the practice of dentistry 

The first lectures on dentistry in America were delivered by Dr. Horace 
H. Hayden in the University of Maryland, School of Medicine, between the 
years 1823-25. These lectures were interrupted in 1825 by internal dissensions 
in the School of Medicine and were as a consequence discontinued. It was 
Dr. Hayden's idea that dental education merited greater attention than had 
been given it by medicine or could be given it by the preceptorial plan of 
dental teaching then in vogue. 

Dr. Horace H. Hayden began the practice of dentistry in Baltimore in 
1800. From that time he made a zealous attempt to lay the foundation for a 
scientific, serviceable dental profession. In 1831 Dr. Chapin A. Harris came to 
Baltimore to study under Hayden. Dr. Harris was a man of unusual ability 
and possessed special qualifications to aid in establishing and promoting formal 
dental education. Since Dr. Hayden's lectures had been interrupted at the 
University of Maryland and there was an apparent unsurmountable difficulty 
confronting the creation of dental departments in medical schools, an indepen- 
dent college was decided upon. A charter was applied for and granted by the 
Maryland Legislature February 1, 1840. The first Faculty meeting was held 
February 3, 1840, at which time Dr. Horace H. Hayden was elected President 
and Dr. Chapin A. Harris, Dean. The introductory lecture was delivered by 
Dr. Hayden on November 3, 1840, to the five students matriculating in the first 
class. Thus was created as the foundation of the present dental profession the 
Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, the first dental school in the world. 

Hayden and Harris, the admitted founders of conventional dental educa- 
tion, contributed, in addition to the factor of dental education, other opportun- 
ities for professional growth and development. In 1839 the American Journal 
of Dental Science was founded, with Chapin A. Harris as its editor. 
Dr. Harris continued fully responsible for dentistry's initial venture 
into periodic dental literature to the time of his death. The files of 
the old American Journal of Dental Science testify to the fine contributions 
made by Dr. Harris. In 1840 the American Society of Dental Surgeons was 
founded, with Dr. Horace H. Hayden as its President and Dr. Chapin A. 
Harris as its Corresponding Secretary. This was the beginning of dental 
organization in America, and was the forerunner of the American Dental 
Association, which now numbers approximately eighty-four thousand in its 
present membership. The foregoing suggests the unusual influence Baltimore 
dentists and the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery have exercised on 
professional ideals and policies. 

In 1873, the Maryland Dental College, an offspring of the Baltimore College 
of Dental Surgery, was organized. It continued instruction until 1878, at which 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 11 

time it was consolidated with the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery. A 
department of dentistry was organized at the University of Maryland in the 
year 1882, graduating a class each year from 1883 to 1923. This school was 
chartered as a corporation and continued as a privately owned and directed 
institution until 1920, when it became a State institution. The Dental Depart- 
ment of the Baltimore Medical College was established in 1895, continuing 
until 1913, when it merged with the Dental Department of the University of 
Maryland. 

The final combining of the dental educational interests of Baltimore was 
effected June 15, 1923, by the amalgamation of the student bodies of the Balti- 
more College of Dental Surgery and the University of Maryland, School of 
Dentistry; the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery becoming a distinct de- 
partment of the University under State supervision and control. Thus we find 
in the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, University of 
Maryland, a merging of the various efforts at dental education in Maryland. 
From these component elements have radiated developments of the art and 
science of dentistry until the strength of its alumni is second to none, in either 
number or degree of service to the profession. 

LIBRARY 

This School is fortunate in having one of the better equipped and or- 
ganized libraries among the dental schools of the country. The library is 
located in the main building and consists of a stack room, offices and a reading 
room accommodating ninety-six students. Over 16,000 books and bound journ- 
als on dentistry and the collateral sciences, together with numerous pamphlets,, 
reprints and unbound journals, are available for the student's use. More than 
200 journals are regularly received by the Library. An adequate staff pro- 
motes the growth of the Library and assists the student body in the use of 
the Library's resources. One of the most important factors of the dental 
student's education is to teach him the value and the use of dental literature 
in his formal education and in promoting his usefulness and value to the 
profession during practice. The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery is ideal- 
ly equipped to achieve this aim of dental instruction. 

COURSE OF INSTRUCTION 

The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, University of 
Maryland offers a course in dentistry devoted to instruction in the medical 
sciences, the dental sciences, and clinical practice. Instruction consists of 
didactic lectures, laboratory instruction, demonstrations, conferences, quizzes 
and hospital ward rounds. Topics are assigned for collateral reading to 
train the student in the value and use of dental literature. The curriculum for 
the complete course appears on pages 20 and 21 of this catalogue. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

Applicants for admission must present evidence of having completed 
successfully two academic years of work in an accredited college of arts and 



12 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

sciences based upon the completion of a four-year high school course or the 
equivalent in entrance examinations. The college course must include at 
least a year's credit in English, in biology, in physics, in inorganic chemistry, 
and in organic chemistry. All required science courses shall include both 
classroom and laboratory instruction. Although a minimum of 60 semester 
hours of credit, exclusive of physical education and military science, is 
required, additional courses in the humanities and the natural and social 
sciences are desirable. By ruling of the Dean's Council, all admission require- 
ments must be completed by June 30 previous to the desired date of admission. 
In considering candidates for admission, the Board of Admissions will 
give preference to those applicants who have high scholastic records in 
secondary school and in college; who make satisfactory scores in the dental 
aptitude test; who present favorable recommendations from their respective 
predental committee or from one instructor in each of the departments of 
biology, chemistry, and physics; and who, in all other respects, give every 
promise of becoming successful students and dentists of high standing. 
Applicants will not be admitted with unabsolved conditions or unabsolved 
failures. 

COMBINED ARTS AND SCIENCES-DENTAL PROGRAM 

The University offers a combined arts and sciences-dental curriculum 
leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Science and Doctor of Dental Surgery. 
The preprofessional part of this curriculum shall be taken in residence in the 
College of Arts and Sciences at College Park, and the professional part in the 
School of Dentistry in Baltimore. 

Students who elect the combined program and who have completed the 
arts and sciences phase of it may, upon the recommendation of the Dean of the 
School of Dentistry, be granted the degree of Bachelor of Science by the Col- 
lege of Arts and Sciences at the commencement following the completion of 
the student's second year in the School of Dentistry. A student may enter the 
arts ancT sciences-dental program at College Park with advanced standing 
from an accredited college or university, but the last year of the prepro- 
fessional training must be completed at College Park and the professional 
training must be completed in the School of Dentistry of the University of 
Maryland. 

Arts-Dentistry Curriculum 

Freshman Year 

Eng. 1, 2 — Composition and American Literature 

Zool. 1 — General Zoology 

Zool. 2 — Advanced General Zoology 

Chem. 1, 3 — General Chemistry 

Math. 10, 11 — Algebra, Trigonometry, Analytic Geometry 

Speech 18, 19 — Introductory Speech 

Physical Activities 

A. S. 1, 2 — Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Hea. 2, 4 — Hygiene (Women) 2 2 

Total 18-19 18-19 



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SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 13 

Sophomore Year I II 

Eng. 3. 4 or 5, 6 — Composition and World or English Literature 3 3 

Soc. 1 — Sociology of American Life "1 

and 13 3 

G. & T. 1 — American Government J 

Chem. 35, 30. 37, 38 — Organic Chemistry 4 4 

•H. 5. G— History of American Civilization 3 3 

tModern Language 3 3 

Thysical Activities 1 1 

A. S. 3, 4 — Basic Air Force R. O. T. C. (Men) 3 3 

Total 17-20 17-20 

Juvior Year 

Modern Language (continued) 3 3 

Phys. 10, 11— Fundamentals of Physics 4 4 

Approved Minor Courses 9 9 

Elective? 3 3 

Total 19 19 

Senior Year 

The curriculum of the first year of the School of Dentistry of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland is accepted by the College of Arts and Sciences as the 
fourth year (major sequence) of academic work toward the degree of Bachelor 
of Science. 

If at the end of the junior year the student decides to postpone his en- 
trance to the School of Dentistry and to remain in the College of Arts and 
Sciences and complete work for the Bachelor's degree, he may choose a major 
and minor in any of the departments in which he has completed the necessary 
underclass requirements. The general nature of the first three years of this 
curriculum and the generous electives of the third year make possible for 
the student a wide choice of departments in which he may specialize. In 
general the electives of the third year will be chosen as for a major in some 
particular department. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION AND ENROLLMENT 

In the selection of students to begin the study of dentistry the School 
considers particularly a candidate's proved ability in secondary education and 
his successful completion of prescribed courses in predental collegiate train- 
ing. The requirements for admission and the academic regulations of the 
College of Arts and Sciences, University of Maryland, are strictly adhered to 
by the School of Dentistry. 

A student is not regarded as having matriculated in the School of Den- 
tistry until such time as he shall have paid the matriculation fee of $10.00, 
and is not enrolled until he shall have paid a deposit of $200.00. This deposit 
is intended to insure registration in the class and is not returnable. 



• Students planning to request admission to the Dental School with only two years 
of predental training should take Physics 10-11. 

+ Fr. or Ger. 6, 7 — Intermediate Scientific French or German recommended. 



_ 



U UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

APPLICATION PROCEDURES 

Candidates seeking admission to the Dental School should first write 
to the Office of the Dean requesting- a preliminary information form. Upon 
the receipt and the examination of this form by the Board of Admissions 
an application blank will be sent to those candidates who merit consideration. 
Each applicant should fill out the blank in its entirety and mail it promptly, 
together with the application fee and photographs, to the Board of Admissions, 
Dental School, University of Maryland, Baltimore 1, Maryland. The early 
filing of an application is urged. Applicants wishing advice on any problem 
relating to their predental training or their application should communicate 
with the Board of Admissions. 

All applicants will be required to take the Dental Aptitude Test. This 
test will be given at various testing centers throughout the United States, 
its possessions and Canada. Applicants will be notified by the Council on 
Dental Education of the American Dental Association of the dates of the 
tests and the locations of the testing centers. 

Promising candidates will be required to appear before the Board of 
Admissions for an interview. On the basis of all available information the 
best possible applicants will be chosen for admission to the School. 

A certificate of entrance will be issued to each successful applicant, 
which will permit him to matriculate and to register in the class to which 
he has applied. 

ADMISSION WITH ADVANCED STANDING 

(a) Graduates in medicine or students in medicine who have completed two 
or more years in a medical school, acceptable to standards in the School of 
Medicine, University of Maryland, may be given advanced standing to the 
Sophomore year provided the applicant shall complete under competent regu- 
lar instruction the courses in dental technology regularly scheduled in the 
first year. 

(b) Applicants for transfer must (1) meet fully the requirements for ad- 
mission to the first year of the dental course; (2) be eligible for promotion to 
the next higher class in the school from which he seeks to transfer; (3) show 
an average grade of five per cent above the passing mark in the school where 
transfer credits were earned; (4) show evidence of scholastic attainments, 
character and personality; (5) present letter of honorable dismissal and recom- 
mendation from the dean of the school from which he transfers. 

(c) All applicants for transfer must present themselves in person for an 
interview before qualifying certificate can be issued. 

ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS 

In order to receive credit for a full session, each student must have entered 
and be in attendance on the day the regular session opens, at which time 
lectures to all classes begin, and remain until the close of the session, the dates 
for which are announced in the calendar of the annual catalogue. 



. SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 15 

Regular attendance is demanded. A student whose attendance in any 
course is unsatisfactory to the head of the department will be denied the priv- 
ilege of final examination in any and all such courses. A student with less than 
85 per cent attendance will not be promoted to the next succeeding year. 
However, in certain unavoidable circumstances of absences, the Dean and 
the Council may honor excuses exceeding the maximum permitted. 

GRADING AND PROMOTION 

The following symbols are used as marks for final grades: A (100-91), 
B (90-84), C (83-77), and D (76-70), Passing; F (below 70), Failure; I, In- 
complete. Progress grades in courses are indicated as "Satisfactory" and 
"Unsatisfactory." 

A Failure in any subject may be removed only by repeating the subject 
in full. Students who have done work of acceptable quality in their completed 
assignments but who, because of circumstances beyond their control, have been 
unable to finish all assignments, will be given an Incomplete. A student shall 
not carry an Incomplete into the next succeeding year. When he has completed 
the requirements for the removal of an Incomplete, the student shall be given 
the actual grade earned in the course. 

Scholastic averages are computed on the basis of semester credits as- 
signed to each course and numerical values for grades. The numerical values 
are A-4; B-3; C-2; D-l; F~0. The grade point average is the Gum of the 
products of semester credits and grade values, divided by the total number of 
semester credits. 

Students who attain a grade point average of 1.5 in the Freshman year 
will be promoted. At the end of the Sophomore year an overall grade point 
average of 1.75 is required for promotion. A grade point average of 2.0 is 
required for promotion to the Senior year and for graduation. 

Students who fail to meet the minimum grade point averages required 
for promotion and who fall into the following categories will be allowed pro- 
bationary promotion: 

1. Freshmen who attain a grade point average of 1.25-1.49. 

2. Sophomores who attain an overall grade point average of 1.6-1.74. 

3. Juniors who attain an overall grade point average of 1.85-1.99. 
Probationary statue will not be permitted for two successive years. 

A student may absolve a total of eight credit hours of failures in an ac- 
credited summer school provided he has the grade point average required for 
promotion or graduation, excluding the failure or failures which he has 
incurred. 

EQUIPMENT 

A complete list of necessary instruments and materials for technic and 
clinic courses is prescribed by the Dental School. Arrangements are made by 
the Dental School in advance of formal enrollment for books, instruments and 
materials to be delivered to the students at the opening of school. Each stu- 



16 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

dent is required to provide himself promptly with these prescribed necessities. 
A student who does not meet this requirement will not be permitted to con- 
tinue with his class. 

DEPORTMENT 

The profession of dentistry demands, and the School of Dentistry requires, 
of its students evidence of their good moral character. The conduct of the 
student in relation to his work and fellow students will indicate his fitness 
to be taken into the confidence of the community as a professional man. In- 
tegrity, sobriety, temperate habits, truthfulness, respect for authority and asso- 
ciates and honesty in the transaction of business affairs as a student will be 
considered as evidence of good moral character necessary to the granting of a 
degree. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery is conferred upon a candidate who 
has met the following conditions: 

1. A candidate must furnish documentary evidence that he has attained 
the age of 21 years. 

2. A candidate for graduation shall have attended the full scheduled course 
of four academic years. 

3. He will be required to show a grade point average of 2.0 for the full 
course of study. 

4. He shall have satisfied all technic and clinic requirements of the various 
departments. 

5. He shall have paid all indebtedness to the college prior to the beginning 
of final examinations, and must have adjusted his financial obligations in the 
community satisfactorily to those to whom he may be indebted. 

FEES 

Matriculation fee (required of all entering students) $ 10.00 

Tuition (each year): 

Non-resident student 675.00 

Resident student 400.00 

Student health service (each year) 20.00 

Laboratory breakage deposit: 

Freshman year 10.00 

Sophomore and Junior years 5.00 

In addition to fees itemized in the above schedule, the following assess- 
ments are made by the University: 
Application fee (paid at time of filing formal application for admission) 7.50 

Late registration fee 5.00 

(All students are expected to complete their registration, including 
payment of bills, on the regular registration days.) Those who do 
not complete their registration during the prescribed days will be 
charged a fee of $5.00. 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 17 

Examinations taken out of class and re-examinations 5.00 

One certified transcript of record is issued free of charge. 

Each additional copy is issued only upon payment of 1.00 

Student Activities Fee — Special 

For the purpose of administering various student activities, the Student 
Senate, after approval by the separate classes and the Faculty Council, voted 
a fee of $12.50 to be paid at the time of registration to the Office of the Dean. 

Refunds 

According to the policy of the University no fees will be returned. In case 
the student discontinues his course or fails to register after a place has been 
reserved in a class, any fees paid will be credited to a subsequent course, but 
are not transferable. 

REGISTRATION 

The registration of a student in any school or college of the University 
shall be regarded as a registration in the University of Maryland, but when 
such student transfers to a professional school of the University or from 
one professional school to another, he must pay the usual matriculation fee 
required by each professional school. 

Each student is required to fill in a registration card for the office of the 
Registrar, and make payment of one-half of the tuition fee in addition to all 
other fees noted as payable before being admitted to classwork at the opening 
of the session. The remainder of tuition and fees must be in the hands of the 
Comptroller during registration period for the second half of the academic 
year. 



DEFINITION OF RESIDENCE AND NON-RESIDENCE 

Students who are minors are considered to be resident students if at the 
time of their registration their parents have been domiciled in this state for 
at least one year. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of his 
first registration in the University, and may not thereafter be changed by him 
unless, in the case of a minor, his parents move to and become legal residents 
of the state by maintaining such residence for at least one full year. How- 
ever, the right of the minor student to change from a non-resident to resident 
status must be established by him prior to the registration period for any 
semester. 

Adult students are considered to be resident if at the time of their regis- 
tration they have been domiciled in this state for at least one year, provided 
such residence has not been acquired while attending any school or college in 
Maryland or elsewhere. 



18 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

The word domicile as used in this regulation shall mean the permanent 
place of abode. For the purpose of this rule only one domicile may be claimed 
as a permanent abode. 

STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE 

The School undertakes to supply medical and surgical care for its stu- 
dents through the Student Health Service. This care includes the daily ser- 
vices rendered by a physician and a medical secretary in a well-equipped 
clinic, conveniently located in the Dental School. Also consultations, surgical 
procedures and hospitalization, judged to be necessary by the Service, are 
covered under liberal limitations, depending on length of hospitalization and 
special expenses incurred. 

Students who need medical attention are expected to report at the office 
of the Student Health Service. Under circumstances requiring home treatment, 
the students will be visited at their College residences. 

It is not within the scope of the Service to provide medical care for con- 
ditions antedating each annual registration in the University; nor is it the 
function of this service to treat chronic conditions contracted by students 
before admission or to extend treatment to acute conditions developing in the 
period between academic years or during authorized school vacations. The 
cost of orthopedic applicances, the correction of visual defects, the services 
of special nurses, and special medication must be paid for by the student. 
The School does not accept responsibility for illness or accident occurring 
away from the community, or for expenses incurred for hospitalization or 
medical services in institutions other than the University Hospital, or, in any 
case, for medical expense not authorized by the Student Health Service. 

Every new sudent is required to undergo a complete physical examina- 
tion, which includes oral diagnosis. Any defects noted must be corrected 
with the first school year. The passing of this examination is a requirement 
for the final acceptance of any student. 

Each matriculant must present, on the day of his enrollment, a statement 
from his ophthalmologist regarding the condition of his eyes, and where de- 
fects in vision exist he shall show evidence that corrections have been made. 

If a student should enter the hospital during the academic year, the 
Service will arrange for the payment of part or all of the hospital expenses, 
depending on the length of stay and the special expenses incurred. This ar- 
rangement applies only to students admitted through the office of the School 
physician. 

Prospective students are advised to have any known physical defects 
corrected before entering the School in order to prevent loss of time which 
later correction might involve. 

SCHOLARSHIP AND LOAN FUNDS 

A number of scholarship loans from varous organizations and educa- 
tional foundations are available to students in the School of Dentistry. These 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 19 

loans are offered on the basis of excellence in scholastic attainment and the 
need on the part of students for assistance in completing- their course in 
dentistry. It has been the policy of the Faculty to recommend only students 
in the last two years for such privileges. 

The Henry Strong Educational Foundation 

From this fund, established under the will of General Henry Strong of 
Chicago, an annual allotment is made to the Baltimore College of Dental 
Surgeiy, Dental School, University of Maryland, for scholarship loans avail- 
able for the use of young men and women students under the age of twenty- 
five. Recommendations for the privileges of these loans are limited to stu- 
dents in the Junior and Senior years. Only students who through stress of 
circumstances require financial aid and who have demonstrated excellence in 
educational progress are considered in making nominations to the secretary 
of this fund. 

The Edward S. Gaylord Educational Endowment Fund 

Under a provision of the w r ill of the late Dr. Edward S. Gaylord, of 
New Haven, Connecticut, an amount approximating $16,000 was left to the 
Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, University of Maryland, 
the proceeds of which are to be devoted to aiding worthy young men in secur- 
ing dental education. 

The W. K. Kellogg Foundation 

During World War II the Foundation recognized the burden that the 
accelerated course imposed upon many dental students who under normal cir- 
cumstances would earn money for their education by employment during the 
summer vacation. The Foundation granted to this School a fund to pro- 
vide rotating loans to deserving dental students. 

The Albert A. Harrington Fund 

This fund was established in 1954 by the New Jersey Alumni Association 
in memory of Dr. Albert A. Harrington, a member of the Class of 1910. The 
fund is a source of valuable help in aiding students to solve their temporary 
financial problems. 

The E. Benton Taylor Scholarship 

One of the finest scholarships in the field of dental education, the E. 
Benton Taylor Scholarship was conceived and arranged by Mrs. Taylor and 
will be perpetuated by the Luther B. Benton Company of Baltimore. It was 
put into operation in 1954 and will be awarded annually to a Maryland student 
of each entering class, who will continue to receive its benefits during the 
four years of his dental school course. 



20 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



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22 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

ANATOMY 

Professor Hahn (Head of Department) ; Associate Professor Thompson; 

Assistant Professor Edmond C. Vanden Bosche; 

Drs. Jagielski, Lindenberg, Loveman, Sachs; and Mr. Sinnreich 

Anat. 111. Human Gross Anatomy (8). First year. 

This course consists of dissection and lectures, supplemented by fre- 
quent conferences and practical demonstrations. The entire human body is 
dissected. 

The subject is taught with the purpose of emphasizing the principles of 
the body structure, the knowledge of which is derived from a study of its 
organs and tissues, and the action of its parts. Arrangements can be made 
to accommodate qualified students and dentists interested in research or in 
making special dissections or topographical studies. 

Anat. 112. Human Neuroanatomy (2). First year. Second semester. Pre- 
requisite Anatomy 111 or equivalent. 

Neuroanatomy is offered in the Freshman year following Gross Anatomy. 
The work consists of a study of the whole brain and spinal cord by gross 
dissections and microscopic methods. Correlation is made, whenever possible, 
with the student's work in the histology and physiology of the central nervous 
system. 

Anat. 113. Comparative Tooth Morphology (1). First year. Second semes- 
ter. 

The course treats the evolutionary development of dentition as a neces- 
sary factor in the study of human oral anatomy. It includes a comparative 
study of the teeth of the animal kingdom, with a comparative study of the 
number, position and form of the teeth. 

Anat. 114. Tooth Morphology (3). First year. Second Semester. 

This course is designed to teach the form and structure of the teeth, and 
includes a study of the nomenclature of surfaces, divisions and relations of 
the teeth. In the laboratory the student is trained in the carving of the 
various teeth and in the dissection of extracted teeth through their various 
dimensions. 

The second part of the course includes a study of the supporting struc- 
tures of the teeth and of the relation of the teeth to these structures. The 
periods of beginning calcification, eruption, complete calcification, and shed- 
ding of the deciduous teeth; followed by the periods of beginning calcifica- 
tion, eruption, and complete calcification of the permanent teeth, are studied 
and correlated with the growth in size of the jaws and face. 

For Graduates 

Anat. 211. Human Gross Anatomy (8). 

Same as course 111 but with additional work on a more advanced level. 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 23 

Anat. 212. Human Neuroanatomy (2). 

Same as course 112 but with additional instruction of a more advanced 
nature. 

Anat. 214. The Anatomy of the Head and Neck (3). 

One conference and two laboratory periods per week for one semester. 
Anat. 216. Research. Credit determined by amount and quality of work 
performed. 

BIOCHEMISTRY 

Professor Vanden Bosche (Head of Department) ; 
Mr. Norris and Mr. Leonard 

Biochem. 111. Principles of Biochemistry (6). First year. Prerequisites in- 
organic and organic chemistry, with additional training in quantitative 
and physical chemistry desirable. 

Two lectures and one laboratory period throughout the year. The chem- 
istry of living matter forms the baeis of the course. The detailed subject 
matter includes the chemistry of carbohydrates, fats, proteins, enzymes, vita- 
mins, and hormones. The processes of respiration, digestion, metabolism, 
secretion and excretion are considered. Laboratory instruction in qualitative 
and quantitative blood and urine examination is included. 

For Graduates 

Biochem. 211. Advanced Biochemistry (6). Prerequisite Biochemistry 111. 

Two lectures, one conference and one laboratory period throughout the 
year. 

Biochem. 212. Research in Biochemistry. Prerequisite Biochemistry 211. 

DENTAL HISTORY AND LITERATURE 

Professor Foley (Head of Department) 

Lit. 121. Oral and Written Communication (2). Second year. 

A formal course of lectures is given in the second year. Many aspects 
of the instruction are given practical application in the third and fourth years. 
The course has many purposes, all of them contributing to the training of 
the students for effective participation in the extra-practice activities of the 
profession. Particular attention is given to instruction in the functioning of 
the agencies of communication in dentistry: the dental societies and the dental 
.periodicals. The practical phases of the course include a thorough study of- 
the preparation and uses of oral and written composition by the dental stu- 
dent and the dentist; the use of libraries; the compilation of bibliographies; the 
collection, the organization, and the use of information; the management of 
dental meetings; the oral presentation of papers; and professional corres- 
pondence. 

Lit. 141. Thesis (2). Fourth year. 



24 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Hist. 142. Dental History (1). Fourth year. 

Lectures in Dental History describe the beginnings of the art of dental 
practice among ancient civilizations, its advancement in relation to the develop- 
ment of the 60-called medical sicences in the early civilizations, its struggle 
through the Middle Ages and, finally, its attainment of recognized profes- 
sional status in modern times. Special attention is given to the forces and 
stresses that have brought about the evolutionary progress from a primitive 
dental art to a scientific health service profession. 

DENTAL PROSTHESIS 

A. Removable Complete and Partial Prosthesis 

Professor G. Gaver (Head of Department) ; 

Associate Professor Ogges&n, Ramsey and Warner; 

Drs. Gordon, Primrose, Smith, and Watson 

Pros. Ilia. Dental Materials (4). First year. 

This course is designed to provide the student with a scientific back- 
ground in the nomenclature, composition, physical properties, practical ap- 
plication, and proper manipulation of the important materials used in the 
practice of dentistry, excluding drugs and medicinals. 

The theoretical aspect of the course is presented in the form of lectures, 
demonstrations, informal group discussions, and directed supplemental read- 
ing. From the practical standpoint, the student manipulates and tests the 
various materials in the laboratory, being guided by prepared project sheets. 
The student develops an understanding of these factors: the importance of 
scientific testing of a material before it is used by the profession at large; 
the realization that every material ha& its limitations, which can be compen- 
sated for only by intelligent application and manipulation; and an apprecia- 
tion of the vast field of research open to those who wish to improve the ma- 
terials now available. 

Pros. 112a. Introduction to Complete Denture Prosthesis (1). First year. 

Second semester. 

This course is devoted to the manipulation of impression compound and the 
procedures used in developing impressions of edentulous arches, casts and 
bite plates. It embraces a series of lecture-demonstrations designed to give 
the student a knowledge of the essential fundamentals in complete denture 
construction. 

Pros. 121a, Complete Denture Prosthesis (2). Second year. 

This course is given by lecture demonstrations on bite registration, tooth 
arrangement, and final finish of complete dentures. 

Pros. 131a. Basic Clinical Complete Denture Prosthesis (5). Third year. 
The course includes a study of the practical application in the clinic of 
the fundamentals taught in the preceding years. Demonstrations of the 
various technics of impression and bite taking are offered to provide the 
student with additional knowledge necessary for clinic work. 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 25 

Pros. 133a. Introduction to Removable Partial Denture Prosthesis (1). Third 

year. Second semester. 

This lecture-demonstration course embraces all phases of removable 
partial denture construction. Experiments and exercises are arranged to give 
the student the fundamentals in designing, casting and finishing partial 
dentures. 

Pros. 141a. Advanced Clinical Denture Prosthesis (4). Fourth year. . . 

This course consists of the clinical application of the fundamentals 
taught in the previous years. Particular attention is given to a standard 
method of denture construction to equip the student with a basic technic for 
use in private practice. 

B. FIXED PARTIAL PROSTHESIS 

Professor NuttcUl (Head of Department) ; 

Associate Professors Dosh, McLean-Lu and Oggesen; 

Drs. M. Graham and Steele 

Pros. 122b. Principles of Fixed Partial Prosthesis (6). Second year. 

This lecture and laboratory course is designed to provide a background of 
fundamental knowledge in fixed partial denture prosthesis. The interrelations 
of the biological and mechanical aspects of dentistry are emphasized. The 
principles involved and the procedures used in abutment preparations, the con- 
struction of fundamental retainers and pontic sections, and the assemblage of 
fixed bridge restorations are presented in detail and correlated with the 
requirements of occlusion. In addition to these procedures, the technics in- 
clude impressions, wax manipulation, pattern construction, investing and 
casting. 

Pros. 132b. Ceramic and Plastic Restorations (2). Third year. First semester. 
This course presents the uses of porcelain and methyl methacrylate 
as restorative materials. Instruction is given in the procedures of 
preparation, impressions, color selection, temporary protection and cementa- 
tion. These materials are employed in the construction of complete veneer 
crowns and dowel crowns and in staining and glazing technics. 

Pros. 134b. Basic Clinical Fixed Partial Prosthesis (4). Third year. 

This is a comprehensive course in the essential requirements for the 
successful use of the fixed partial denture. Special consideration is given to 
fundamental factors in diagnosis, treatment planning and clinical procedures. 
The course integrates biological factors, mechanical principles and esthetic 
requirements with restorative treatment. Emphasis is placed on the physio- 
logical considerations as a basis for fixed partial denture service. 

Pros. 142b. Advanced Clinical Fixed Partial Prosthesis (3). Fourth year. 
This course provides clinical training and experience for the student. 
The acquired background of knowledge is utilized in rendering treatment 
services for patients. Experience ifl gained in assessing completely the dental- 
problem, planning a practical treatment consistent with the total dental needs, 



26 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

and providing services which satisfy the objectives of prevention, function and 
esthetics. 

DIAGNOSIS 

Professor Biddix {Head of Department) ; 
Drs. Bryant, W. L. Graham and Lebo 

Diag. 131. Principles of Oral Diagnosis and Treatment Planning (2). Third 

year. 

The fundamental principles and procedures in the diagnosis of oral and 
related diseases are studied by intimate clinical observation and discussion of 
interesting cases. The study of the oral cavity through an understanding 
of its relation to other parts of the body is emphasized. By means of consulta- 
tions with other departments the procedures of a comprehensive diagnosis 
are developed and applied in treatment planning. 

Diag. 132. Seminar. Third year. 

The objective of this course is to teach the student to correlate clinical, 
roentgenologic and laboratory findings. Selected patients are presented by both 
medical and dental teachers. 

Diag. 141. Clinical Oral Diagnosis and Treatment Planning (1). Fourth year. 
This course is a continuation of Diagnosis 131 and 132. 

HISTOLOGY 

Professor McCrea {Head of Department) ; 
Associate Professor Provenza 

Hist. 111. Mammalian Histology and Embryology (8). First year. 

The course embraces the thorough study of the cells, tissues and organs 
of the various systems of the human body. Although certain aspects of the 
dental histology phase of the course are given strictly as special entities, many 
are included in the instruction in general histology, since the two areas are 
so intimately related when functional and clinical applications are considered. 

The instruction in embryology is correlated with that in histology. It 
covers the fundamentals of development of the human body, particular 
emphasis being given to the head and facial regions, the oral cavity, and the 
teeth and their adnexa. Specific correlations are also made with the other 
courses in the dental curriculum. 

For Graduates 
Hist. 212. Mammalian Histology and Embryology (6). 

This course is the same as Histology 111, except that it does not include 
the dental phases of 111, but does include additional instruction and collateral 
reading of an advanced nature. 

Hist. 213. Mammalian Oral Histology and Embryology (2). Prerequisite, 

Histology 111 or 212, or an equivalent course. 

This course covers the dental aspects of Histology 111, and includes 
additional instruction in the relations of histologic structure and embryologic 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 27 

development of the teeth, their adnexa, and the head and facial regions of the 
human body. 

Hist. 214. Research in Histology. Number of hours and credit by arrange- 
ment. 

Hist. 215. Research in Embryology. Number of hours and credit by ar- 
rangement. 

MEDICINE 

A. General Medicine 

Associate Professor McLean: Drs. Kuehn, Leonard and Ogden 
Med. 121a. First Aid. Second year. Second semester. 

In this course the student is instructed in the basic principles of first aid. 
Med. 122a. Principles of Medicine (2). Third year. 

The course is taught by lectures, visual aids and x-ray demonstrations of 
diseases of the cardio-respiratory, gastrointestinal, genitourinary and nervous 
systems. 

Med. 141a. Physical Diagnosis (1). Fourth year. Second semester. 

Slides and clinical demonstrations are used to show the methods of 
recognition of important objective signs as they relate to body disturbances. 
The methods of taking blood pressure are also taught. 

Med. 142a. Principles of Medicine (2). Fourth year. 

Throughout the year the entire class is taken into the hospital for medical 
clinics where the close application of medical and dental knowledge in history 
taking, diagnosis, laboratory procedures and treatment is emphasized. 

Med. 143a. Preventive and Public Health Dentistry (1). Fourth year. Sec- 
ond semester. 

The objectives of this course are to emphasize those measures other than 
remedial operations that will tend to minimize the occurrence or the extension 
of oral disease, and to outline the status of dentistry in the field of general 
public health. The relations of dentistry with other phases of public health are 
discussed, as are the problems affecting the administration of dental health 
programs. Special effort is made to demonstrate methods and materials suit- 
able for use in dental health education programs. 

Med. 144a. Clinical Conferences. Fourth year. 

Throughout the year small groups of students are taken into the hospital 
for medical ward rounds, demonstrations and discussions. 

B. Oral Medicine 

Associate Professor Biddington; Assistant Professor Abramson; 
Drs. T. F. Clement and N orris 

Med. 121b. Principles of Endodontics (1). Second year. 

The lecture phase presents the fundamentals necessary for an understand- 



28 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

ing of the endodontic procedures, the indications and contraindications for 
maintaining pathologically affected teeth, and the various methods used in 
performing the necessary steps to prevent the loss of such teeth. The labor- 
atory phase is designed to acquaint the student with the technics employed 
to prevent the loss of pathologically involved teeth. 

Med. 122b. Introduction to Periodontics (1). Second year. 

The lectures place special emphasis on the importance of oral hygiene 
and its relation to the prevention of all dental disorders. The causes, results, 
and treatment of unhygienic conditions of the oral cavity are fully considered. 
Demonstrations are given in the prophylactic treatment of the mouth and in 
the accepted methods of tooth brushing to be used in home care. In the labora- 
tory the student learns on special manikins the use of the periodontal instru- 
ments. By progressive exercises and drills he is taught the basic principles of 
good operating procedure and the methods of thorough prophylactic treatment. 

Med. 131b. Basic Clinical Endodontics (1). Third year. 

During the Junior year, the student applies the fundamentals he has 
learned by performing endodontic procedures on clinical cases. 

Med. 132b. Basic Clinical Periodontics (1). Third year. 

The lectures present the etiology, clinical symptoms, diagnosis, prognosis, 
and methods of treatment of the various forme of periodontal disease, other- 
diseases of the oral cavity, and lesions of the lips, cheeks, and tongue. The 
recognition of periodontal disease in its incipient forms and the importance 
of early treatment are stressed. The lectures are well illustrated by color 
slides, moving pictures, and other visual aids. The Junior student is required 
to apply the fundamentals he has learned by performing periodontal pro- 
cedures on a prescribed number of clinical cases. 

Med. 141b. Advanced Clinical Endodontics (1). Fourth year. 

During his Senior year the student performs the endodontic procedures on 
the difficult clinical cases. 

Med. 142b. Advanced Clinical Periodontics (1). Fourth year. 

The Senior student performs the periodontal procedures on clinical pa- 
tients exhibiting the more advanced periodontal problems. 

MICROBIOLOGY 

Professor Shay (Head of Department) ; Mr. Vilk 

Microbiol. 121. Dental Microbiology and Immunology (4). Second year. First 

semester. 

The course embraces lectures, laboratory, demonstrations, recitations, and 
group conferences, augmented by guided reading. Practial and theoretical 
consideration is given to pathogenic bacteria, viruses, yeasts and molds. 
Special attention is given to those organisms which cause lesions in and about 



SCHOOL OF DESTISTRY 29 

the oral cavity, particularly primary focal infections about the teeth, tonsils, 
etc. which result in the establishment of secondary foci. Immunological and 
serological principles are studied, with special consideration being given to 
hypersensitivity resulting from the use of antibiotics, vaccines, antigens, and 
other therapeutic agents. 

Laboratory teaching includes the methods of staining and the cultural 
characteristics of microorganisms; their reaction to disinfectants, antiseptics, 
and germicides; methods of sterilization and asepsis; animal inoculation; 
preparation of sera, vaccines, and antitoxins; a study of antibiotics; and a 
demonstration of virus techniques. In all phases of the course emphasis is 
placed on dental applications. 

For Graduates 

Microbiol. 200, 201. Chemotherapy (1-2). Prerequisite Microbiology 121 or 
equivalent. 

One lecture a week. Offered in alternate years. 

A study of the chemistry, toxicity, pharmacology and therapeutic value 
of drugs employed in the treatment of disease. 

Microbiol. 202, 203. Reagents and Media (1, 1). 

One lecture a week. Offered in alternate years. 

A study of the methods of preparation and use of bacteriological reagents 
and media. 

Microbiol. 210. Special Problems in Microbiology. Credit determined by 
amount and quality of work performed. 
Laboratory course. 

Microbiol. 211. Public Health (1-2). Prerequisite Microbiology 121 or equiva- 
lent. 
Lectures and discussions on the organization and administration of state 

and municipal health departments and private health agencies. The course 

also includes a study of laboratory methods. 

.Microbiol. 221. Research in Microbiology. Credit determined by amount and 
quality of work performed. 

OPERATIVE DENTISTRY 

Professor Randolph {Head of Department) ; Associate Professor Medina; 

Assistant Professors H. M. Clement, Louie and Edmond G. Vanden Bosche ; 

Drs. Beaven and C. Gaver 

Oper. 121. Fundamentals of Operative Dentistry (5). Second year. 

The student is trained in the technical procedures of cavity preparation 
and the manipulation of the restorative materials employed in the treatment 
of diseases and injuries of the tooth structure. These basic principles are ap- 
plied on composition teeth and extracted natural teeth. Instruction includes 
twenty-six lectures and forty-eight three-hour laboratory periods. 



30 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Oper. 131. Basic Clinical Operative Dentistry (4). Third year. 

This course is a continuing development of the fundamentals taught 
in Operative 121. The objective is to present the additional information 
which is necessary for the management of practical cases. Instruction in- 
cludes lectures, demonstrations and clinical practice in which the student treats 
patients under the individual guidance of staff members. 

Oper. 141. Advanced Clinical Operative Dentistry (6). Fourth year. 

With the background provided by Operative 121 and 131, the student is 
able to comprehend and apply the procedures for treating the more compli- 
cated operative problems. The objectives of this course are to instruct the 
student in the different procedures by which a comprehensive operative 
service can be rendered and to acquaint him with as many unusual clinical 
cases as possible. Instruction includes lectures, demonstrations, and clinical 
practice. 

ORTHODONTICS 

Professor Preis (Head of Department) ; 

Assistant Professors Shehan and Swinehart; 

Drs. Cullen, Kress, and Schaeffer 

Ortho. 131. Principles of Orthodontics (2). Third year. 

The course consists of lectures supplemented by slides and motion pictures. 
The subject matter includes the history of orthodontics and the study of 
growth and development, evolution of human dental occlusion, forces of 
occlusion, etiology of malocclusion, aberrations of the maxilla and mandible 
which affect occlusion, and tissue changes incident to tooth movement. 

Ortho. 141. Clinical Orthondontics (1). Fourth year. 

Students are assigned in small groups to the Clinic where patients are 
given a thorough dental examination. Under the direction of an instructor 
each case is diagnosed, methods of procedure are explained, and treatment 
planning is outlined. In the more simple cases therapy is undertaken by the 
students under the supervision of an instructor. Students, therefore, have the 
opportunity of applying clinically the knowledge which they received during 
their Junior year. 

PATHOLOGY 

Professor M. S. Aisenberg (Heud of Department) ; 

Associate Professor Weinberg ; Assistant Professor A. D. Aisenberg ; 

Drs. Granruth and J. A. Graham 

Path. 121. General Pathology (4). Second year. Second semester. 

The general principles of disease processes and tissue reactions, both 
gross and microscopic, are taught wth the objectives of training the student to 
recognize and be familiar with the abnormal and of creating a foundation 
for further study in the allied sciences. Emphasis is placed upon those diseases 
in the treatment of which medicodental relationships are to be encountered. 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 31 

Path. 131. Oral Pathology (3). Third year. First semester. 

The course includes a study of the etiology and the gross and microscopic 
manifestations of diseases of the teeth and their investing structures: patho- 
logic dentition, dental anomalies, periodontal diseases, calcific deposits, dental 
caries, pulpal diseases, dentoalveolar abscesses, oral manifestations of 
systemic diseases, cysts of the jaws, and benign and malignant lesions in and 
about the oral cavity. 

Path. 141. Seminar. Fourth year. 

This constitutes a part of the cancer teaching program sponsored by a 
grant from the United States Public Health Service. It is conducted by visit- 
ing lecturers who are specialists in their respective fields. 

For Graduates 

Path. 211. Advanced Oral Pathology (8). 

Two lectures and two laboratory periods throughout the year. 

This course is presented with the objective of correlating a knowledge of 
histopathology with the various aspects of clinical practice. Studies of surgi- 
cal and biopsy speciments are stressed. 

Path. 212. Research. Time and credit by arrangement. 
Research in areas of particular interest to the student. 

PEDODONTICS 

Associate Professor Sanders; Dr. Ehrlich 

Ped. 121. Technics of Pedodontics (1). Second year. Second semester. 

This laboratory course in dentistry for children consists of sixteen labora- 
tory periods. Demonstrations and visual aids are utilized to augment the 
teaching procedure. The work is performed on model teeth in primary dento- 
forms and consists of exercises in cavity preparation in primary teeth for 
the proper reception of different restorative materials, in the technic of re- 
storing a fractured young permanent anterior tooth, and in the construction 
of a basic type of space maintainer. 

Ped. 131. Clinical Pedodontics (1). Third year. 

The student is introduced to clinical dentistry for children. He utilizes 
the technical procedures learned in the laboratory. Didactic instruction 
includes sixteen lectures offered during the first semester. Emphasis is given 
to the management of the child patient with necessary modifications for 
behavior problems. The indications and contraindications for pulpal therapy 
are evaluated for the purpose of rational tooth conservation. Oral hygiene, 
roentgenology, growth and development, and caries susceptibility tests are 
taught. 

Training in preventive orthodontics is given for true denture guidance 
and to allow the student to institute interceptive or early remedial measures 
in incipient deformities. 



32 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

The Department endeavors to develop in the student a comprehensive 
interest in guiding the child patient through the period of the mixed dentition. 
A separate clinic, equipped with child-size chairs and supervised by the 
pedodontics staff, provides adequate opportunity for clinical applications of 
the methods taught in laboratory and lectures. 

Ped. 141. Clinical Pedodontics (1). Fourth year. 

The student continues his clinical training throughout the year and is 
assigned the more difficult cases. 

PHARMACOLOGY 

Professor Dobbs (Head of Department) ; 
Drs. Ross and Brown 

Pharmacol. 131. General Pharmacology and Therapeutics (4). Third year. 

The course is designed to provide a general survey of pharmacology, 
affording the students the necessary knowledge for the practice of rational 
therapeutics. The course is taught by lectures, laboratory and demonstra- 
tions. The first semester consists of sixteen hours of didactic work including 
instruction in pharmaceutical chemistry, pharmacy, prescription writing, and 
the pharmacodynamics of the local-acting drugs. 

The second semester consists of thirty-two hours of didactics and forty- 
eight hours of laboratory instruction. The laboratory experiments are per- 
formed by students on animals and are designed to demonstrate the direct 
effects of drugs on vital tissues. The subject material consists of the pharma- 
codynamics of the systemic-acting drugs and the anti-infective agents. In the 
therapeutics phase the students are instructed in the use of drugs for the pre- 
vention, treatment, and correction of general and oral diseases. 

Pharmacol. 141. Oral Therapeutics (1). Fourth year. First semester. 

This course consists of sixteen hours of lectures and demonstrations. 
It is designed to acquaint the students with the practical applications of 
pharmacology in the treatment of dental and oral diseases. Particular emphasis 
is given to the newer drugs and the more recent advances in therapeutics. 
Patients from the dental clinics and the hospital are used for demonstrations 
whenever possible. 

Pharmacol. 142. Nutritional Therapeutics (1). Fourth year. Second semester. 
This course consists of sixteen hours of lectures and demonstrations 
devoted to the principles and practices of nutritional therapeutics. The 
presentation includes a study of the dietary requirements of essential food 
substances in health and disease. The vitamin and mineral deficiency states 
with their pathology and symptomatology are presented with suggestions 
for dietary and drug therapy. Metabolic diseases are discussed, and their 
effects on the nutritional states are considered. Students are taught to plan 
diets for patients with various nutritional problems, such as those resulting 
from loss of teeth, the use of new appliances, dental caries, stomatitis, 
cellulitis, osteomyelitis, and bone fractures. 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 33 

A project study is made by each student which includes analyses of 
his basal metabolic requirement, his total energy requirement, and his 
dietary intake in relation to hie daily needs. 

PHYSIOLOGY 

Professor Oster (Head of Department) ; 
Assistant Professors Shipley and Pollack 

Physiol. 121. Principles of Physiology (6). Second year. 

Lectures deal with the principal fields of physiology, including heart 
and circulation, peripheral and central nervous functions, respiration, diges- 
tion, muscular activity, hepatic and renal functions, water and electrolyte 
balance, special senses, general and cellular metabolism, endocrines and 
reproduction. In the laboratory work (first semester) the classic experiments 
on frog and turtle muscle and heart function are followed by more advanced 
work on rabbits, cats, dogs and the students themselves. A special series 
of lectures is devoted to the application of basic physiologic principles to 
human clinical problems. 

For Graduates 

Physiol. 211. Principles of Mammalian Physiology (6). Prerequisite per- 
mission from the department. 
Same as course 121 but with collateral reading and additional instruction. 

Physiol. 212. Advanced Physiology. Hours and credit by arrangement. 
Lectures and seminars during the second semester. 

Physiol. 213. Research. Hours and credits by arrangement. 

PRACTICE ADMINISTRATION 

Professor Biddix; Dr. Lovett and Mr. O'Donnell 

Pract. Adm. 141. Principles of Administration (1). Fourth year. First 

semester. 

The objective of this course is to prepare students to assume the social, 
economic and professional responsibilities of dental practice. The lectures 
embrace the selection of the office location and office equipment, the basis of 
determining fees, the methods of collecting accounts, the use of auxiliary 
personnel, and the choice of various types of insurance and investments. A 
comprehensive bookkeeping system for a dental office is explained. 

Pract. Adm. 142. Ethics (1). Fourth year. Second semester. 

The course includes lectures on general ethics and its basic teachings, 
and an interpretation of the philosophical principles adopted by the American 
Dental Association and embodied in its "Principles of Ethics." 

Pract. Adm. 143. Jurisprudence (1). Fourth year. Second semester. 

The special aim of the course is to ground the rtudent in the funda- 



34 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

mentals of law as they are related to the dentist and his patient. The rights 
and limitations of each are considered through lectures and conferences. A 
series of practical cases in which suits have been threatened or entered by 
patients against the dentist will be reviewed in the light of trial table outcome 
or basis on which compromise adjustments have been made. 

ROENTGENOLOGY 

Associate Professor Dabrowski; 
Drs. Goldberg and Skib 

Roentgenol. 131. Principles of Dental Roentgenology (2). Third year. 

The lectures include a study of the physical principles involved in the 
production of x-rays and a discussion of their properties and effects, the 
hazards of roentgenography to both operator and patient, the technics of 
taking roentgenograms, and the processing of the films. 

The conference periods deal with the roentgenographic study of the 
normal anatomic structures in health and the variations noted under various 
pathologic conditions. 

Roentgenol. 132. Introduction to Clinical Dental Roentgenology. Third year. 

Second semester. 

The division of the class into small groups permits individual supervision 
in the clinical application of the material presented in Roentgenol. 131. Under 
guidance the student learns to correctly place, expose and process the film and 
mount a full series of dental roentgenograms. 

Roentgenol. 141. Clinical Dental Roentgenology (1). Fourth year. 

Under a system of rotating assignments students are placed in constant 
association with the routine practical use of the roentgen ray. They are 
required to master the fundamental scientific principles and to acquire techni- 
cal skill in taking, processing, and interpreting all types of intraoral and 
extraoral films. 



SURGERY 

Professors Dorsey (Head of Department), Helrich, Robinson and Y eager; 
Associate Professor Cappuccio; 
Assistant Professors Siwinski and Inman; 
Drs. Bushey, J. Graham, Grovmbow, Leatherman, Parker and Staker 

Surg. 131. Anesthesiology (2). Third year. 

Local anesthesia is taught in both principle and practice. In lectures and 
clinics all types of intraoral, extraoral, conduction and infiltration injections; 
the anatomical relation of muscles and nerves; the theory of action of anes- 
thetic agents and their toxic manifestations are taught. Demonstrations are 
given in conduction and infiltration technics; students give injections under 
supervision of an instructor. 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 35 

General anesthesia is taught in lectures and clinic demonstrations. The 
action of the anesthetic agents, methods of administration, indications and 
contraindications, and the treatment of toxic manifestations are included. 
Demonstrations are given in the preparation of the patient, the administration 
of all general anesthetics (inhalant, rectal, spinal, and intravenous), and the 
technics for oral operations. Clinics are held in the Department of Oral Surgery 
in the Dental School and in the Hospital. 

Surg. 132. Oral Surgery (3). Third year. 

The course consists of lectures on the principles of surgery, the classifica- 
tion of teeth for extraction, and the pre- and postoperative treatment of 
ambulatory patients. 

The student is assigned to the Deparment of Oral Surgery on a rotating 
schedule and is required to produce local anesthesia and extract teeth under 
the supervision of an instructor. 

Surg. 141. Oral Surgery (3). Fourth year. 

This course consists of lectures, clinical assignments, and practical 
demonstrations on the etiology, pathology, diagnosis and treatment of all 
classes of tumors, infections, deformities, anomalies, impacted teeth, fractures 
and surgical problems associated with the practice of dentistry. Hospital 
clinics, demonstrations and ward rounds are given to familiarize the student 
with abnormal conditions incident to the field of his future operations and to 
train him thoroughly in the diagnosis of benign and malignant tumors. 

Weekly seminars are held in the Hospital. Each student prepares and 
presents an oral surgery case report according to the requirements of the 
American Board of Oral Surgery. 

For Graduates 

Surg. 201. Clinical Anesthesiology (6). Forty hours a week for thirteen 
weeks. 

Surg. 220. General Dental Oral Surgery (4). Two lectures and two labora- 
tory periods a week for one semester. 

Surg. 221. Advanced Oral Surgery (4). Two lectures and two laboratory 
periods a week for one semester. 

Surg. 222. Research. Time and credit by arrangement. 

VISUAL AIDS IN TEACHING 

Mr. Taylor and Staff 

The Department of Visual Aids employs the latest photographic technics 
and equipment for the production of both monochromatic and full-color still 
and motion pictures. By cooperation with other departments new material 
is developed for lectures, clinics, publications and exhibits. 

Through photography the School retains for teaching purposes interesting 
cases that appear in the clinics, preserves evidence of unusual pathological 
cases, and records anatomical anomalies, facial disharmonies and malocclusions 



36 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

of the teeth. In addition the student, through hie contact with photographic 
uses, becomes acquainted with the value of photography in clinical practice. 
Students are advised as to the use of visual aids in the preparation of lectures 
and theses, the arrangement and co-ordination of materials, and the organiza- 
tion and maintenance of records and histories. 

SPECIAL COURSES 

SUMMER COURSES 

As the need arises, summer courses are offered in any of the subjects 
included in the regular curriculum. For details concerning each course consult 
pages 24-37 in this catalog. A charge of $10.00 for each semester hour credit 
is made for these courses. 

POSTGRADUATE COURSES 

Postgraduate courses are offered to qualified dental graduates. These 
courses are designed to provide opportunities for study in special fields on a 
refresher level, and are arranged so that particular emphasis is placed on 
clinical practices. 

Anatomy of the Head and Neck 

This course is designed to review certain principles of Anatomy and to 
furnish the student opportunities to relate these principles to clinical practice. 
Instruction is presented in the form of illustrated lectures, seminars, and 
laboratory dissection. One semester, full time. Tuition, $200.00. Maximum 
expense for books, supplies, and equipment, $45.00. 

Oral Pathology 

The course in Oral Pathology is presented with the objective of correlating 
a knowledge of histopathology with the various aspects of clinical practice. 
The physiology of the periodontal attachment and the pathology of the dental 
pulp, the periodontium, the hard tissues of the teeth, odontogenic cysts and 
tumors, and cancer in and about the oral cavity are stressed. Studies of 
surgical and biopsy specimens are also emphasized. Opportunity for supervised 
research in areas of particular interest to the student will be available. One 
year, full time. Tuition, $550.00. Maximum expense for books, supplies, and 
equipment, $75.00, which includes microscope fee of $25.00. 

Oral Surgery 

The course in Oral Surgery is organized to train the dentist in advanced 
surgical procedures of the oral cavity and the associated parts. Although 
primarily designed for the general practitioner, the course can be used as 
credit toward specialization in Oral Surgery. One year, full time. Tuition, 
$550.00. Maximum expense for books, supplies, and equipment, $75.00. 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 37 

Periodontia 

The course in Periodontia consists of a review of the etiology, pathology, 
clinical symptoms, diagnosis and methods of treatment of the various types 
of periodontal disease. Instruction is presented by means of lectures, seminars 
and clinical demonstration. One semester, full time. Tuition, $200.00. Maxi- 
mum expense for books, supplies, and equipment, $75.00. 

Prosthesis 

Instruction will be given in the fundamental principles and factors in- 
volved in complete denture prosthesis, the general problems in diagnosis and 
treatment planning, and the procedures of constructing partial and complete 
dentures. Ample opportunity will be provided for the application of the basic 
principles and procedures of clinical practice. One semester, full time. Tuition, 
$200.00. Maximum expense for books, supplies, and equipment, $300.00. 

Visual Aids 

The basic principles and practices of Visual Aids are presented by lecture, 
demonstration and laboratory technics. Practical photography and mouiage are 
featured, with instruction in department organization and exhibition arrange- 
ment. Four weeks, full time. Tuition $150.00. 

Occasional Part-Time Courses 

The fees charged part-time students who may be enrolled in any of the 
special courses are prorated on a basis of the full-time charge of $550.00, with 
a minimum charge of $100.00 for any one course. 



THE GORGAS ODONTOLOGICAL SOCIETY 

The Gorgas Odontological Society was organized in 1916 as an honorary 
student dental society with scholarship as a basis for admission. The Society 
was named after Dr. Ferdinand J. S. Gorgas, a pioneer in dental education, a 
teacher of many years' experience, and during his life a great contributor to 
dental literature. It was with the idea of perpetuating his name that the 
Society adopted it. 

To be eligible for membership a student must be in the first 30 per cent of 
his class. The selection of this 30 per cent shall be based on the weighted 
percentage average system as outlined in the school regulations. The meetings, 
held once each month, are addressed by prominent dental and medical men, an 
effort being made to obtain speakers not connected with the University. The 
members have an opportunity, even while students, to hear men associated with 
other educational institutions. 

OMICRON KAPPA UPSILON 

Phi Chapter of Omicron Kappa Upsilon honorary dental society was 
chartered at the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, Uni- 



38 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



versity of Maryland during the session of 1928-29. Membership in the society 
is awarded to a number not exceeding 12 per cent of the graduating class. 
This honor is conferred upon students who through their professional course 
of study creditably fulfill all obligations as students, and whose conduct, 
earnestness, evidence of good character and high scholarship recommend them 
to election. 



The following graduates of the 1956 Class were elected to membership: 

Marvin Bennet Golberg Richard Andrew Saal 

Stanley Barry Goldberg Caesar Michael Silvestro 

Herald Donald Green, Jr. Allie Skib 

Ralph Stuart Johnson Joseph Harry Toropilo 

Albert Andrew Kapsak Gilbert Tronier 

Vernon A. Lake Gilbert Garland Youngblood 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

The first annual meeting of the Society of the Alumni of the Baltimore 
College of Dental Surgery was held in Baltimore, March 1, 1849. This organi- 
zation has continued in existence to the present, its name having been changed 
to The National Alumni Association of the Baltimore College of Dental 
Surgery, Dental School, University of Maryland. 

The officers of the Alumni Association for 1956-1957 are as follows: 



President 

Frank Hurst 

1726 Eye St., N.W. 

Washington, D. C. 

Secretary 

Joseph P. Cappuccio 

1010 St. Paul Street 

Baltimore 2, Maryland 

Historian 

Milton B. Asbell 

25 Haddon Avenue 

Camden, New Jersey 



President-Elect 

Daniel E. Shehan 

Medical Arts Building 

Baltimore 1, Maryland 

Treasurer 
Howard Van Natta 
Medical Arts Building 
Baltimore 1, Maryland 

Editor 

Kyrle W. Preis 

700 Cathedral Street 

Baltimore 1, Maryland 



UNIVERSITY ALUMNI COUNCIL REPRESENTATIVES 



Frank Hurst, 1957 
Washington, D. C. 



Daniel E. Shehan, 1958 
Baltimore, Maryland 



Harry Levin, 1958 

3429 Park Heights Avenue 

Baltimore 15, Maryland 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 39 

EXECUTIVE COUNCIL 

Joseph M. Tighe, Chairman, 1959 
Baltimore, Maryland 

Edwin G. Gail, 1957 Howard B. Wood, 1957 

Baltimore, Maryland Cumberland, Maryland 

Max K. Baklor, 1958 Eugene L. Pessagno, Jr., 1958 

Baltimore, Maryland Baltimore, Maryland 

John T. Stang, 1958 Irving Abramson, 1959 

Baltimore, Maryland Baltimore, Maryland 

Lawrence W. Bimestefer, Ex-Officio 
Dundalk, Maryland 

TRUSTEES FOR NATIONAL ALUMNI FUND 

Trustees Ex-Officio 

Frank Hurst, President 

Daniel E. Shehan, President-Elect 

Arthur I. Bell, Secretary-Treasurer 

Joseph M. Tighe, Chairman of Erecutive Council 

Myron S. Aisenberg, Dean 

Elmer Corey, 1957 Meyer Eggnatz, 1957 

Baltimore, Maryland Miami Beach, Florida 

Augustine L. Cavallaro, 1958 Irving B. Golboro, 1958 

New Haven, Connecticut Baltimore, Maryland 

Frank N. Carroll, 1959 Lewis C. Toomey, 1959 

Wheeling, West Virginia Silver Spring, Maryland 

SENIOR PRIZE AWARDS 

The following prizes were awarded to members of the Senior Class for 
the 1955-1956 Session: 

The Alexander H. Paterson Memorial Medal 

For Practical Set of Full Upper and Lower Dentures 

Allie Skib 

Honorable Mention „ _ „ Mario Bonanti 

The Isaac H. Davis Memorial Medal 

(Contributed by Dr. Leonard I. Davis) 

For Cohesive Gold Filling 

Allie Skib 

Honorable Mention _ _ Armand Shelby Hall 

The Alumni Association Medal 

For Thesis 
Gilbert Roland Tronier 

Honorable Mention Herbert William Grambow, Jr. and 

Herald Donald Green, Jr. 



40 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

The Harry E. Kelsey Award 

(Contributed by former associates of Dr. Kelsey: Drs. Anderson, 
Devlin, Hodges, Johnston and Preis) 

For Professional Demeanor 
Ralph Stuart Johnson 

The Harry E. Latcham Memorial Medal 

For Complete Oral Operative Restoration 

Joseph Harry Toropilo 
Honorable Mention _ „ „ _ Herbert Hidesuke Akamine 

The Edgar J. Jacques Memorial Award 

For Meritorious Work in Practical Oral Surgery 
Allie Skib 

The Herbert Friedberg Memorial Award 

(Contributed by the New Jersey Alumni Chapter of the 
National Alumni Association) 

For Achievement by a New Jersey Senior 

Stuart LaKind 

The James P. McCormick Award 

For Meritorious Work in the Treatment of Traumatic 
Injuries of the Face and Jaws 

Herbert William Grambow, Jr. 






SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 41 

REGISTER OF STUDENTS 
1956-1957 Session 

GRADUATING CLASS 

1955-1956 Session 

Robert James Agresti, B.A., The Catholic University of America, 1952 

New Jersey 

Herbert Hidesuke Akamine, B.S., University of Hawaii, 1939 Hawaii 

Waverley Conway Artz, B.A., University of Mississippi, 1951 Mississippi 

Edward Jerome Becker, B.S., University of Maryland, 1952 

District of Columbia 

Robert John Belliveau, B.S., Seton Hall University, 1952 New Jersey 

Kenneth Edward Bertram, B.S., Syracuse University, 1947 Maryland 

Henry Joseph Bianco, Jr., Loyola College Maryland 

Mario Bonanti, B.A., Gannon College, 1951 Pennsylvania 

Frederick Thomas Brennan, B.A., University of Maine, 1952 Maine 

Stanley Louis Brown, B.S., University of Maryland, 1952 Maryland 

Morton Alfred Brownstein, College of William and Mary Virginia 

Bernard Busch, B.A., Tulane University of Louisiana, 1953 New Jersey- 
Robert Roscoe Callahan, B.S., University of Georgia, 1951 Florida 

Anthony Alain Caputi, University of Vermont Rhode Island 

Aaron Jacob Chmar, University of Maryland Maryland 

Donald Eugene Cone, Washington Missionary College Maryland 

Frederick Earl Connelly, Bowdoin College Massachusetts 

Joseph Anthony Corbo, B.A., Saint Peter's College, 1952 New Jersey 

Victor Benjamin Costa, University of Miami New Jersey 

Michael Alexander Costrino, B.A., Boston University, 1951 . . . .Massachusetts 

Donald LeRoy Cramer, University of Delaware Delaware 

Remo Angelo DelRosso, St. Anselm's College Massachusetts 

David Arthur Denisch, University of Maryland Maryland 

William Frank Evans, Jr., A.A., University of Florida, 1952 Florida 

Francis Xavier Falivene, B.S., Seton Hall University, 1951 New Jersey 

Andrew Federico, Rutgers University New Jersey 

Fred Seymour Fink, B.A., University of Delaware, 1952 Maryland 

Michael Edward Fleming, B.S., St. Bernardine of Siena College, 1952 

New York 

Jack Lester Frasher, Furman University. South Carolina 

Marvin Lewis Friedman, B.A., University of Connecticut, 1952 

Connecticut 

Robert Albeit Gagne, B.S., University of Maryland, 1953 Connecticut 

Charles Joseph Galiardi, B.S., University of Maryland, 1952 Maryland 

Francis Eugene Gassiraro, B.A., Boston College, 1952 Massachusetts 

Marvin Bennett Golberg, B.S., University of Maryland, 1952 Maryland 

Stanley Barry Goldberg, B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1949 

Maryland 
Herbert William Grambow, Jr., B.S., University of Maryland, 1953 

Maryland 



42 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Herald Donald Green, Jr., B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1952. . .Pennsylvania 

Armand Shelby Hall, Washington and Lee University Maryland 

Alfred Hamel, B.S., Providence College, 1952 Rhode Island 

Albert Edward Heimert, III, B.S., University of Maryland, 1952 Maryland 

Leonard George Henschel, University of Maryland District of Columbia 

Gene Caryl Hose, West Virginia University West Virginia 

Blaine Ellsworth Jarrett, B.A., West Virginia University, 1952 

West Virginia 

Jerome Philip Jermain, Jr., B.S., St. Michael's College, 1952 Connecticut 

Ralph Stuart Johnson, University of Utah Utah 

Albert Andrew Kapsak, Mt. St. Mary's College Pennsylvania 

Paul Samuel Keller, B.A., Gettysburg College, 1951 Maryland 

Edward McCauley Kelly, Loyola College Maryland 

Ralph Lawrence Kercheval, West Virginia University West Virginia 

Thomas Frederick Kern, Mt. St. Mary's College Connecticut 

Francis Joseph Kihn, B.S., Loyola College, 1952 Maryland 

Norman Dale Kisamore, University of Maryland Maryland 

Eugene Francis Kobylarz, B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1952 New Jersey 

Jerome Boris Krachman, B.A., University of Buffalo, 1952 New Jersey 

Vernon A. Lake, Presbyterian College South Carolina 

Stuart LaKind, Seton Hall University New Jersey 

Charles Edward Landry, St. Anselm's College Massachusetts 

Peter Joseph Lapolla, Providence College Rhode Island 

Kendrick Roger Lawrence, B.A., University of Vermont, 1951 Vermont 

Jules Joseph Levin, B.A., Western Maryland College, 1952 Maryland 

Walter Joseph Lucas, Jr., Belmont Abbey College North Carolina 

Philip Dennis Marano, Loyola College Maryland 

Clayton Swearingen McCarl, B.S., University of Maryland, 1952 

Maryland 

Carlton Joseph McLeod. B.A., Brown University, 1952 Rhode Island 

Francis Xavier McNulty, St. Anselm's College Massachusetts 

Harry Leroy Mertz, Jr., Gettysburg College Maryland 

Steven Jay Miller, B.A., Rutgers University, 1952 New Jersey 

Dale Roger Moss, University of South Carolina West Virginia 

Robert Paul Murphy, B.A., Loyola College, 1952 Maryland 

George Herman Nieske, B.A., American International College, 1952 

Massachusetts 

James Philip Norris, B.S., University of Maryland, 1950 Maryland 

Christopher James O'Connell, Jr., B.S., College of the Holy Cross, 1952 

Massachusetts 

Ferdinand Frank Pagano, Niagara University New Jersey 

Raymond Walter Palmer, Jr., B.S., University of Maryland, 1952. . . .Maryland 

Robert Dickey Parker, Morris Harvey College West Virginia 

Thomas Henry Paterniti, B.S., Seton Hall University, 1952 New Jersey 

Donald Pivnick, University of Connecticut Connecticut 

Jose Ramon Prieto-Hernandez, B.S., University of Puerto Rico, 1951 

Puerto Rico 

Charles Allen Ridgeway, Phoenix College Arizona 

Laurence Ray Rollins, Marshall College West Virginia 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 43 

Paul Leon Roxin, University of Maryland Maryland 

Richard Andrew Saal, Loyola College Maryland 

Eugene Marcellus Sadd, Xavier University West Virginia 

Herbert Otto Scharpf, Tufte College New Jersey 

Charles August Schlegel, Jr., Providence College Connecticut 

Arthur Seymour Schuster, B.S., University of Maryland, 1952 Maryland 

Caesar Michael Silvestro, New York University New Jersey 

Allie Skib, B.S., St. Michael's College, 1952 Massachusetts 

Irby Garrion Sorrells, B.S., Berry College, 1938 Maryland 

Jack Haldane Soutar, University of Florida Florida 

Lloyd Eraest Svennevig, A.B., Atlantic Union College, 1950. . . .Massachusetts 

Warren Edward Thurston, B.S., University of Maryland, 1952 Maine 

Joseph Harry Toropilo, University of Maryland Connecticut 

Harold Michael Trepp, B.A., The Catholic University of America, 1952 

Connecticut 

Gilbert Roland Tronier, University of Utah Utah 

Donald Collis Weikert, B.S., University of Maryland, 1955 

District of Columbia 

Anthony John Wickenheiser, Jr., University of Maryland Maryland 

Robert James Wilson, Western Maryland College Maryland 

Byron Crosby W T oodside, The George Washington University Virginia 

George Dietrich Yent, Jr., Virginia Polytechnic Institute Maryland 

Gilbert Garland Youngblood, West Virginia University West Virginia 



HONORS 
Summa Cum Laude 

Gilbert Roland Tronier 

Magna Cum Laude 

Ralph Stuart Johnson Richard Andrew Saal 

Marvin Bennett Golberg Gilbert Garland Youngblood 

Albert Andrew Kapsak 

Cum Laude 

Allie Skib Stanley Barry Goldberg 

Caesar Michael Silvestro Vernon A. Lake 

Herald Donald Green, Jr. Joseph Harry Toropilo 

DEGREE CONFERRED AUGUST 1, 1955 

Maurice Gerard Lussier, St. Anselm's College New Hampshire 

James Harvey Stribling, Jr., B.S., Mississippi College, 1951 Mississippi 



44 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Senior Class 

Norman Stanley Alpher, The George Washington University 

District of Columbia 

William Milton Barbush, West Virginia University West Virginia 

Robert Lehman Bartlett, B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1953 

Maryland 

Eugene Arthur Beliveau, B.S., Boston College, 1953 Massachusetts 

Daniel Willis Benton, University of Utah Utah 

William Frederick Bishop, B.S., University of Maryland, 1953 Maryland 

John Frederick Black, Fairleigh Dickinson College New Jersey 

Louis Blum, The Newark Colleges of Rutgers University Pennsylvania 

Charles Daniel Broe, Tufts College Massachusetts 

William George Buchanan, University of Maryland New Jersey 

Vito Dominic Buonomano, Jr., B.S., Providence College, 1953. . . .Rhode Island 

James Ambrose Butler, Jr., Niagara University New York 

Charles Wallis Buttner, University of Miami Florida 

Richard Ernest Cabana, Seton Hall University New Jersey 

Hubert Thomas Chandler, Morris Harvey College West Virginia 

Robert Lee Childs, B.A., Duquesne University, 1952 Pennsylvania 

Neil Cohen, University of Miami Florida 

William Eugene Colliver, B.S., University of Maryland, 1956 Maryland 

Joseph Andre Croteau, B.S., College of the Holy Cross, 1953. . . .Massachusetts 
Bertrand Saul Dann, B.S., University of Maryland, 1951; 

M.S., 1953 Maryland 

Urban Bernard DeCosta, B.S., Providence College, 1953 Rhode Island 

Frederick Bertrand Delorme, University of Vermont and State 

Agricultural College Vermont 

John Joseph DeMartin, University of Vermont and State Agricultural 

College Connecticut 

Robert Edward DeMartin, University of Vermont and State Agricultural 

College Connecticut 

John Henry Dempsey, A.B., West Virginia University, 1953 West Virginia 

Elliott Howard Dickler, B.S., University of Maryland, 1953 Maryland 

Seymour Bernard Fingerhood, B.A., New York University, 1952. . .New Jersey 

Karl Josef Foose, Marshall College West Virginia 

William Grady Franklin, B.S., University of Maryland, 1955 Maryland 

Paul Edward Freed, University of Maryland Maryland 

Joseph Patrick Garvey, B.S., College of the Holy Cross, 1953 . . Rhode Island 

Roy Frank Gherardi, B.A., New York University, 1952 New York 

George William Greco, Mount St. Mary's College Maryland 

Ray Evan Griffin, B.A., University of Vermont and State Agricultural 

College, 1953 Vermont 

Jimmy Ray Hager, West Virginia University West Virginia 

Walter Burnell Hall, A.B., Cornell University, 1953 Massachusetts 

Raymond Donald Haslam, Washington Missionary College Pennsylvania 

Paul Emmet Higgins, University of Maryland Maryland 

Orville Clayton Hurst, Jr., University of Maryland Maryland 

Thomas Kent Ingram, Virginia Military Institute Virginia 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 45 

Gerald Marshall Isbell, University of Maryland Maryland 

William McDonald Johnson. Berea College Florida 

Livia Kalnins, The Johns Hopkins University, McCoy College Latvia 

William Ignatius Keene, Mt. Saint Mary's College New Jersey 

John Poist Ketfer, Jr., Villanova College New Jersey 

James Van Lieu Kiser, Davis and Elkins College West Virginia 

Fred Herman Andrew Koeniger, The University of Rochester New York 

Robert Leo LaFon, B.A., West Virginia University, 1951 West Virginia 

William Edgar Landefeld, Jr., B.A., Western Maryland College, 1953 

Maryland 

Kenneth Joseph Langfield, University of Massachusetts Massachusetts 

George Albert Lippard, Jr., B.S., Davidson College, 1953 South Carolina 

Donald Bruce Lurie, Western Maryland College Maryland 

John Joseph Martielli, B.S., Davis and Elkins College, 1953 Florida 

Dennis Laurent Maud, B.A., Norwich University, 1953 New York 

Jerry Wayne Medlock, B.S., Presbyterian College, 1953 Texas 

Ernest Charles Merkel, Jr., B.S., University of Maryland, 1951 Maryland 

Eugene Joseph Messer, A.B., St. Michael's College, 1953 Massachusetts 

Joe Harvey Miller, Jr., University of Maryland Maryland 

John Charles Miller, Jr., University of Maryland District of Columbia 

Ralph Charles Monroe, University of Maine Maine 

John George Mueller, B.A., Duke University, 1953 Oklahoma 

Raymond Elliot Mullaney, B.S., University of Maryland, 1952 .. Massachusetts 

Nassif Joseph Nassif, West Virginia University West Virginia 

Minor Paul Nestor, B.S., University of Maryland, 1953 Maryland 

Thomas Francis Owens, The Pennsylvania State College Pennsylvania 

Rafael Angel Pagan-Colon, B.S., University of Puerto Rico, 1950. .Puerto Rico 

Roy Christopher Page, A.B., Berea College, 1953 South Carolina 

Orie Nicholas Passarelli, B.S., Saint Peter's College, 1953 New Jersey 

William Russell Patteson, Marshall College West Virginia 

Peter Pecoraro, Jr., B.S., Providence College, 1953 Rhode Island 

John Vincent Puleo, B.A., Providence College, 1953 Rhode Island 

Alfred Joseph Rapuano, The Newark Colleges of Rutgers University 

New Jersey 

Clyde Eugene Reed, B.S., West Virginia University, 1951 West Virginia 

Angelo Michael Repole, University of Maryland New Jersey 

William Henry Ruppert, Jr., University of Maryland Maryland 

Charles Benjamin Rushford, Jr., A.B., West Virginia University, 1953 

West Virginia 

Herbert Henry Rust, Queens College New York 

Edward Thomas Ryan, III, B.A., The American International 

College, 1952 Massachusetts 

Francis John Salvato, A.B., Gettysburg College, 1953 New Jersey 

Alvin Robert Sayers, Midwestern University Vermont 

Abraham Schachter, B.A., The University of Connecticut, 1953 Connecticut 

Albert Seymore Schaffer, University of Maryland Maryland 

Paul Kenneth Schick, Tufts College Connecticut 

Robert Jay Schwartz, Emory University Connecticut 



46 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Harry Edwin Semler, Jr., B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1953. .Maryland 

Joseph Israel Shevenell, B.S., St. Michael's College, 1947 Maine 

Carl S. Singer, B.S., University of Maryland, 1953 Maryland 

Elwood Stanley Snyder, Jr., Middlebury College New Jersey 

Robert John Stag, University of Maryland Maryland 

Thomas Dodds Stokes, Jr., B.A., The University of North Carolina, 

1953 North Carolina 

Alan Stoler, University of Miami Florida 

William Andrew Stout, B.S., Tufts College, 1953 New York 

John Malcomb Stribling, University of Florida Florida 

James Richard Sullivan, Montgomery Junior College Maryland 

Carl Anthony Tomosivitch, B.S., St. John's University, 1953 New York 

Joel Jacob Ulanet, Lafayette College New Jersey 

John David Vachon, A.B., West Virginia University, 1952; M.S., 

1953 West Virginia 

John Wilson Vargo, Morris Harvey College West Virginia 

Hans Kvamme Varmer, B.A., Washington Missionary College, 1951. .Maryland 

Frank Joseph Verdecchia, B.S., University of Maryland, 1955 Maryland 

Richard Howard Warren, New York University New Jersey 

George William Waxter, University of Maryland Maryland 

Frederick Brown Williams, The Citadel .South Carolina 

Gerald Zimmerman, B.A., Dartmouth College, 1952 .New Jersey 



Junior Class 

Ralph Richard Asadourian, B.A., University of New Hampshire, 

1954 New Hampshire 

Ronald James Bauerle, B.A., Providence College, 1954 Connecticut 

Carl Mitchell Baumann, University of Florida Florida 

Philip Stanley Benzil, B.S., University of Miami, 1954 Florida 

Thomas Henry Birney, B.A., University of Southern California, 1954 

California 

Stanley Earle Block, University of Maryland Maryland 

Joseph Paul Bodo, Jr., B.S., University of Tampa, 1954 Florida 

Stanley Saul Brager, B.S., University of Maryland, 1954 Maryland 

Harry Edward Brandau, Jr., University of Maryland Maryland 

Robert Sherman Brown, University of Pennsylvania New Jersey 

John Paul Burton, West Virginia University West Virginia 

Enrique Rafael Capo, Haverford College Puerto Rico 

Robert Ernest Chait, University of Miami Florida 

Virgil Lewis Chambers, Marshall College : West Virginia 

George Elmore Collins, B.S., University of Maryland, 1956 Maryland 

Martin Richard Crytzer, B.S., University of Maryland, 1954 Pennsylvania 

Stanley Carl DelTufo, B.A., Rutgers University, 1954 New Jersey 

William Clinton Denison, West Virginia University West Virginia 

F. Lee Eggnatz, University of Florida Florida 

Melvin Feiler, Upsala College New Jersey 

Dayton Carroll Ford, Marshall College West Virginia 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 47 

Orton Dittmar Frisbie, University of Florida Florida 

Jose Antonio Fuentes, University of Puerto Rico Puerto Rico 

John William Gannon, Jr., A.B., West Virginia University, 1954 West Virginia 

Richard Chris Georgiades, Virginia Military Institute Florida 

Robert Goren, B.S., University of Maryland, 1952 Maryland 

Barbara Lorraine Greco, A.B., The Newark Colleges of Rutgers 

University, 1954 New Jersey 

Anton Grobani, B.S., University of Maryland, 1954 Maryland 

Fernando Haddock, B.S., University of Puerto Rico, 1954 Puerto Rico 

Robert William Haroth, University of Maryland Maryland 

Barry Ronald Harris, University of Maryland Maryland 

Richard McFern Hemphill, A.B., West Virginia University, 1954 

West Virginia 
Gerald Franklin Hoffman, B.A., University of Connecticut, 1954 . . Connecticut 

Paul Harvey Hyland, University of Delaware Delaware 

William Louis Hyman, University of Miami Florida 

Allen Burton Itkin, University of Connecticut Connecticut 

Lawrence Paul Jacobs, A.B., Temple University, 1954 Delaware 

Alfred Howard Jansen, Jr., University of Maryland Maryland 

Robert Mathie Johnson, B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1954 .. Maryland 

Paul Franklin Kief man, B.S., The American University, 1951 Virginia 

Robert Harmon McLloyd Killpack, B.A., University of Utah, 1954 Utah 

Anthony Joseph Klein, Jr., B.S., University of Cincinnati, 1954 New York 

David Rodman Lecrone, University of Delaware Delaware 

Walter Prudden Leonard, Emory University Florida 

John Frank Lessig, B.S., University of Maryland, 1956 Maryland 

Herbert Gary Levin, University of Maryland Maryland 

Donald Palmer Lewis, Norwich University Massachusetts 

Robert Bernard Lewis, B.S., College of the Holy Cross, 1954 Rhode Island 

Benedict Salvatore LiPira, B.S., University of Maryland, 1954 Maryland 

Garrett Isaac Long, Jr., A.B., West Virginia University, 1954. .. .Maryland 

Luis Felipe Lucca, B.S., University of Puerto Rico, 1948 Puerto Rico 

Albert Silveira Luiz, A.B., Boston University, 1952 Massachusetts 

Lawford Earle Magruder, Jr., University of Maryland Maryland 

Clyde Danforth Marlow, Emory University Florida 

Carlos Rafael Matos, University of Puerto Rico Puerto Rico 

Edward Robert McLaughlin, B. S., University of Massachusetts, 1954 

Massachusetts 

David Frederick Mehlisch, Graceland College Maryland 

Raymond Dennis Menton, Jr., B.S., Loyola College, 1954 Maryland 

Anthony Nicholas Micelotti, B.S., Boston College, 1952 Massachusetts 

Paul Masashi Morita, University of Maryland New Jersey 

Richard Warren Moss, Emory University Florida 

James Edward Nadeau, American International College Massachusetts 

William Harold Neilund, B.S., University of Maryland, 1951 Maryland 

Philip Patrick Nolan, B.S., Loyola College, 1953 Maryland 

Ralph Fields Norwood, Jr., Bethany College West Virginia 

Guy Sullivan O'Brien, Jr., B.S., Furman University, 1954 South Carolina 



48 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Charles Irving Osman, B.S., University of Florida, 1954 Florida 

Warren Andrew Parker, Mount Saint Mary's College New Jersey 

Bienvenido Perez, Jr., B.S., University of Puerto Rico, 1954 New York 

George Louis Plassnig, University of Maryland Maryland 

Joseph Marion Powell, Furman University South Carolina 

Ralph Weyman Price, North Georgia College Virginia 

Burton Alvin Raphael, University of Maryland Maryland 

Alan Shia Resnek, Tufts College Massachusetts 

Henry Edward Richter, Jr., B.S., University of Maryland, 1954 Virginia 

Peter Arthur Rubelman, Emory University Florida 

John Sidney Rushton, University of Maryland Virginia 

Robert Nicholas Santangelo, Purdue University New Jersey 

Lawrence Donald Sarubin, B.S., University of Maryland, 1949 Maryland 

James Augustus Schaefer, B.S., St. Michael's College, 1954 New York 

Leonard Stanley Schneider, The Johns Hopkins University Maryland 

Howard Schwartz, B.A., Rutgers University, 1954 New Jersey 

Irwin Bernard Schwartz, The Newark Colleges of Rutgers University 

New Jersey 

David Howard Shamer, B.S., University of Maryland, 1951 Maryland 

Charles Irvine Shelton, West Virginia University West Virginia 

Cyril Stanton Sokale, B. A., The University of Connecticut, 1954 . . Connecticut 

Edward William Spinelli, Jr., A.B., Tufts College, 1954 Massachusetts 

Howard Stanton Spurrier, University of Utah Utah 

John Francis Spychalski, B.S., St. Bernardine of Siena College, 1952 New York 

Ivan Lee Starr, A.B., Syracuse University, 1954 New Jersey 

Ronald Martin Starr, University of Maryland Maryland 

Elizabeth Lee Stewart, The Johns Hopkins University Maryland 

Marvin Howard Tawes, Jr., B.S., University of Maryland, 1956 Maryland 

Linn Shecut Tompkins, Jr., University of South Carolina. .. .South Carolina 

Frank Trotta, Jr., A.B., West Virginia University, 1953 West Virginia 

Donald Herbert Wadsworth, Emory University Florida 

James Ray Wampler, Richmond College, University of Richmond Virginia 

William James Washuta, University of Miami Florida 

David Allen Watson, B.S., University of Maryland, 1956 Maryland 

Louis Weiss, University of Maryland Maryland 

William Alvin Wolf, A.B., Upsala College, 1951 Connecticut 

Rodger August Zelles, B.S., Rutgers University, 1954 New Jersey 

Sophomore Class 

Kenneth David Bass, B. A., University of Connecticut, 1953 ; 

M.S., 1955 • Connecticut 

Robert Gene Beckelheimer, Concord College West Virginia 

Frederick Blumenthal, University of Miami Florida 

Leonard Francis Borges, B.S., Tufts College, 1951 Massachusetts 

Martin David Breckstein, University of Florida Florida 

Lawrence Austin Brehne, B.A., Rutgers University, 1951 New Jersey 

Robert Francis Bristol, B.A., Providence College, 1955 Rhode Island 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 49 

John C. L. Brown, Jr., B.S., The Pennsylvania State University, 1952 

Pennsylvania 

Bayard Allen Buchen, Emory University Florida 

Robert Rolland Buckner, Washington Missionary College Georgia 

Barbara Dorothea Bucko, Syracuse University Connecticut 

Thomas Cali, B.S., University of Maryland, 1955 New Jersey 

John Joseph Cartisano, Indiana University New York 

Gary Herbert Cohen, University of Maryland Maryland 

Robert Ted Conner, West Virginia University West Virginia 

Juan Anibal Cuevas-Jimenez, B.S., University of Puerto Rico, 1953 

Puerto Rico 

Adolph Albert Cura, B.A., Boston College, 1955 Massachusetts 

Peter Bernard DalPozzol, Colby College Connecticut 

Allan Lee Danoff , University of Maryland Maryland 

Eugene Frederick deLonge, Newberry College South Carolina 

Joseph Budding Dietz, Jr., Lehigh University Delaware 

Frank Anthony Dolle, B.S., University of Maryland, 1948; M.S., 

1950; Ph.D., 1954 Maryland 

William Frank Dombrowski, B.S., United States Naval Academy, 1950 

Maryland 
James Francis Dooley, B.S., United States Merchant Marine Academy, 

1950 ; A.B., Rutgers University, 1951 New Jersey 

William Edward Dowden, B.S., Niagara University, 1955 New York 

Conrad Castenzio Ferlita, University of Miami Florida 

Raymond Alan Flanders, Colgate University New York 

John Morrison Foley, B.S., Loyola College, 1955 Maryland 

James Arthur Fowler, Jr., University of Maryland Maryland 

Robert Donald Fraser, B.S., Niagara University, 1955 New York 

Richard Lawrence Fraze, Tufts College Florida 

Larry Joe Frick, The Clemson Agricultural College South Carolina 

Thornwell Jacobs Frick, B.S., Davidson College, 1955 South Carolina 

Ivan Orlo Gardner, B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1952 Maryland 

Billy Wade Gaskill, West Virginia University Arkansas 

Gorm Pultz Hansen, University of Maryland Maryland 

Frederick Lewis Hodous, University of Maryland Maryland 

Francis Kurt Hugelmeyer, B.S., College of the Holy Cross, 1955. . . .New York 

Eugene Farley Humphreys, Brigham Young University Idaho 

James Paul Jabbour, B.S., Tufts College, 1950; Ed.M., 1951 Massachusetts 

Calvin Charles Kay, University of Miami Florida 

Edward Gerard Keen, St. Anselm's College Connecticut 

Paul Lewis Keener, University of Maryland Maryland 

Joseph Krall, B.S., University of Maryland, 1948 Maryland 

Jacob Ian Krampf, University of Maryland Maryland 

Frank Walter Krause, B.A., University of Virginia, 1955 New Jersey 

Domenic Edward LaPorta, University of Maryland Connecticut 

Richard John Lauttman, B.S., Loyola College, 1953 Maryland 



50 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Robert Louis Lee, University of Maryland Maryland 

Wallace George Lee, University of Maryland Michigan 

Lester Leonard Levin, University of Maryland Maryland 

Leslie Herminio Lopez- Velez, B.S., University of Puerto Rico, 1955 Puerto Rico 

Joseph Paul Lynch, B.S., Seton Hall University, 1953 New Jersey 

Carlos A. Machuca-Padin, B.S., University of Puerto Rico, 1954. .Puerto Rico 

Arnold Irwin Malhmood, University of Maryland Maryland 

Jose Manuel Martinez, B.S., University of Puerto Rico, 1955 Puerto Rico 

John Kenneth McDonald, Louisiana State University and Agricultural 

and Mechanical College Mississippi 

Thomas James Meakem, Davis and Elkins College New Jersey 

Thomas Eugene Miller, B.S., St. John's University, 1955 New Jersey 

Bernard Lee Morgan, B.A., West Virginia University, 1955 West Virginia 

Fabian Morgan, B.S., Wake Forest College, 1954 North Carolina 

John Worthington Myers, Hagerstown Junior College Maryland 

Elizabeth Haydee Noa, B.A., Nazareth College, 1954 Puerto Rico 

William Barnard O'Connor, Wjest Virginia University West Virginia 

William Robert Owens, B.S., Davidson College, 1954 North Carolina 

Jeff ry Chandler Pennington, The Citadel South Carolina 

Charles Kenneth Peters, Jr., B.S., Loyola College, 1954 Maryland 

Gregory Michael Petrakis, B.S., Trinity College, 1955 Connecticut 

George Jackson Phillips, Jr., B. A., Amherst College, 1955 Maryland 

Barry Pickus, B.A., Western Maryland College, 1955 Maryland 

Donald Alan Pirie, B.S., University of Maryland, 1955 .Maryland 

Anthony Michael Policastro, B.A., Seton Hall University, 1955 .... New Jersey 

Joseph Eul Polino, B.A., Providence College, 1955 Connecticut 

Alben R. Pollack, B.A., Alfred University, 1955 New York 

Joel Pollack, B.S., The City College of New York, 1955 New York 

Albert Edward Postal, University of Maryland District of Columbia 

William Lewis Pralley, B.A., West Virginia University, 1955 . . West Virginia 

John Viering Raese, West Virginia University West Virginia 

William Paul Raimond, University of Maryland Maryland 

Harold Reuben Ribakow, University of Maryland Maryland 

Chester James Richmond, Jr., Tufts College Connecticut 

Matthew Angelo Rocco, B.A., Seton Hall University, 1955 New Jersey 

Lawrence David Rogers, University of Maryland Maryland 

Everett Newton Roush, III, Marshall College Wlest Virginia 

Louis Joseph Ruland, Jr., B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1955 

Maryland 

Raymond Richard Sahley, Marshall College West Virginia 

Charles Salerno, Upsala College New Jersey 

Richard Charles Saville, B. A., University of Maryland, 1955 Maryland 

David Lee Schofield, University of Miami Florida 

Jerome Schwartz, B.S., University of Maryland, 1949 Maryland 

Robert Bernard Silberstein, University of Florida. Florida 

Stanley Leonard Silver, B.S., University of Maryland. 1953 

District of Columbia 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 51 

Francis Vincent Simansky, B.S., Loyola College, 1955 Maryland 

Orlando Louis Skaff, B.A., West Virginia University, 1955 West Virginia 

Philip Smith, University of Vermont and State Agricultural College. .Vermont 

Anthony Sollazzo, Rutgers University New Jersey 

James Frederick Sproul, West Virginia University Ohio 

John Joseph Stecher, B.S., Seton Hall University, 1952 New Jersey 

Donald Dietrich Stegman, B.S., University of Maryland, 1952 Maryland 

Daniel Joseph Sullivan, B.A., Providence College, 1955 Rhode Island 

Charles Carroll Swoope, Jr., University of Florida New Jersey 

Arthur Morton Tilles, University of Maryland Maryland 

John Louis Varanelli, University of Connecticut Connecticut 

Francis Anthony Veltre, B.S., University of Maryland, 1952; 

M.S., 1954 Maryland 

Jorge Vendrell, Tulane University of Louisiana Puerto Rico 

Leonard Clifford Warner, Jr., Colby College Connecticut 

Edgar Clair ^^hite, Marshall College Kentucky 

Thomas Adams Wilson, B.A., Amherst College, 1955 Maryland 

Herbert Sanford Yampolsky, B.S., University of Alabama, 1955. .New Jersey 

Freshman Class 

Joel Martin Adler, Emory University Mississippi 

Earl Robert Alban, Jr., B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1954 .... Maryland 

John Jacob Atchinson, Marshall College West Virginia 

Edmund Donald Baron, Rutgers University New Jersey 

Hulon Edward Beasley, University of Florida Maryland 

John William Biehn, University of Maryland Maryland 

Raymond Cline Bodley, West Virginia University West Virginia 

William Francis Brady, Jr., B.S., Boston College, 1954; M.S., 

University of Massachusetts, 1956 Massachusetts 

Frank Lee Bragg, West Virginia University West Virginia 

Leslie Henry Breden, University of Alabama Maryland 

James Peter Brown, B.A., American International College, 1956 

Massachusetts 

Rolla Ray Burk, Jr., A.B., West Virginia, 1951 West Virginia 

Gene Edward Camp, West Virginia University West Virginia 

Alfred Chesler, Furman University Ohio 

Robert Roy Chesney, Western Maryland College Maryland 

Robert A. Cialone, B.S., University of Maryland, 1955 New Jersey 

William John Cimikoski, A.B., University of Michigan, 1953 Connecticut 

Milton Chipman Clegg, B.A., University of Utah, 1956 Utah 

Clyde Albert Coe, University of Maryland Maryland 

Blanca Collazo, B.S., University of Puerto Rico, 1956 Puerto Rico 

Frank Lateau Collins, West Virginia University West Virginia 

Myron Harris Coulton, University of Florida Florida 

Thomas Joseph Cronin, B.S., De Paul University, 1955 New Jersey 

William Walter Cwiek, B.S., University of Maryland, 1953 Maryland 

Charles Albert Darby, University of Maryland Maryland 



52 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Charles Albert Dean, B.A., Providence College, 1956 Massachusetts 

John Jay Denson, Jr., B.S., University of Florida, 1956 Florida 

Henry Thomas Doherty, Jr., A.B., Boston College, 1956 Massachusetts 

Michael Vincent Doran, Jr., B.S., University of Miami, 1956 Virginia 

Raymond Dzoba, Bowling Green State University New Jersey 

Morton Mayer Ehudin, University of Maryland Maryland 

Joseph Thomas Fay, B.A., Providence College, 1956 Rhode Island 

Humbert Michael Fiskio, A.B., Oberlin College, 1955; 

University of Connecticut, 1956 Connecticut 

Henry Paul Fox, St. Michael's College New York 

Irwood Fox, B.A., University of Virginia, 1956 Virginia 

* Arnold Harvey Fram, Emory University South Carolina 

Joseph Giardina, University of Maryland Maryland 

* Leonard Goodman, B.S., University of Maryland, 1954 Maryland 

Harry Gruen, University of Miami Florida 

Ernest Lee Harris, Jr., Southern Missionary College Florida 

David William Heese, B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1953. . . .Maryland 

*Samuel David Henderson, Berea College Kentucky 

Sanford Sonny Hochman, University of Maryland Maryland 

Edward Allen Hurdle, Jr., B.S., Loyola College, 1956 Maryland 

Clemuel Mansey Johnson, B.A., The University of North Carolina, 1953 

North Carolina 

Nicholas Irving Jones, B.S., The Citadel, 1956 South Carolina 

Norman Lewis Jones, Marshall College West Virginia 

Alan Donald Jung, B.S., University of Maryland, 1952 Maryland 

Don Samuel Killpack, B.S., University of Utah, 1951 Utah 

Irwin Kolikoff, B.S., Florida Southern College, 1953 New Hampshire 

Don Lee Koubek, A.B., West Virginia University, 1955 West Virginia 

Robert Marvin Kriegsman, The University of North Carolina. .North Carolina 
Scot Sueki Kubota, A.B., Colorado State College, 1953; 

A.M., 1954 Hawaii 

Insoo Kwak, A.B., West Virginia University, 1956 West Virginia 

Martin Albert Levin, University of Maryland Maryland 

Marvin Paul Levin, University of Maryland Maryland 

Harry Levy, University of Maryland Maryland 

William Lee Lovern, Concord College West Virginia 

Frederick Magaziner, B.S., University of Maryland, 1954 Maryland 

Martin Magaziner, University of Maryland District of Columbia 

Frank William Mastrola, Jr., B.A., Providence College, 1956. .. .Rhode Island 

Martin Lee Mays, Wofford College South Carolina 

David Henry McLane, Marshall College West Virginia 

John Stephen McLaughlin, West Virginia University Maryland 

James David Mehring, B.A., Pennsylvania Military College, 1956. .. .Maryland 

John Bennett Moore, Jr., Weber College Utah 

Ronald Glenn Morrison, University of Maryland Maryland 



^Attended part session. 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 53 

Richard Franklin Murphy, West Virginia University West Virginia 

Theodore Jacob Noffsinger, Jr., B.A., University of Maryland, 1956. . .Maryland 
Franklin Lewis Oliverio, B.S., West Virginia University, 1956... .West Virginia 

Billy Wendel Olsen, B.A., University of California, 1955 California 

Bernard John Orlowski, Seton Hall University New Jersey 

Philip Kibbee Parsons, West Virginia University West Virginia 

Helmer Eugene Pearson, Upsala College New Jersey 

Alfred John Phillips, University of Florida Florida 

James Vincent Picone, B.S., College of the Holy Cross, 1956 Massachusetts 

Robert Henry Prindle, B.A., St. Michael's College, 1956 New York 

Anthony Joseph Regine, B.S., Tufte College, 1955 Rhode Island 

Jude Philip Restivo, B.S., University of Maryland, 1956 Maryland 

Ronald Lee Ripley, A.B., West Virginia University, 1955 West Virginia 

Malcom Louis Rosenbloum, Emory University Missouri 

Georges Philippe Raynald Roy, A.B., St. Michael's College, 1956 Maine 

William Joseph Rumberger, Mount Saint Mary's College Pennsylvania 

Thomas Melvin Rutherford, West Virginia Wesleyan College. . . .West Virginia 

Frank John Salino, The University of Buffalo New York 

Lawrence Francis Schaefer, St. Michael's College New York 

Roger Clare Sears, University of Maryland Maryland 

Howard Irwin Segal, University of Miami Florida 

Edwin Barry Shiller, Emory University Florida 

Joseph James Smith, Mount Saint Mary's College New York 

Robert Carroll Smith, West Virginia University West Virginia 

Alvin Jerome Snyder, B.S., University of Maryland, 1956 Maryland 

David M. Solomon, B.S., Fordham University, 1956 New Jersey 

Rudolph Clement Strambi, B.S., Fordham University, 1952 New Jersey 

Wayne Eugene Stroud, University of Maryland Illinois 

George Webster Struthere, Jr., B.S., Randolph-Macon College, 1952 

West Virginia 

Joshua Irving Taragin, Yeshiva University Maryland 

Edward Ralph Thompson, Temple University New Jersey 

Robert Speirs Thomson, B.A., Houghton College, 1956 New Jersey 

Earle Alexander Tompkins, Jr., B.S., University of Massachusetts, 1955 

Massachusetts 

Monte Franklin Udoff, University of Michigan Wisconsin 

Gilbert Allen Vitek, Graceland College Maryland 

Raymond Francis Waldron, A.B., Boston College, 1956 Massachusetts 

Martin Truett Watson, B.S., Emory University, 1954 Georgia 

Irwin Robert Weiner, University of Akron Ohio 

Wayne Clark Wills, West Virginia University West Virginia 

Charles Rosser Wilson, B.S., Wake Forest College, 1956 North Carolina 

Dale Lee Wood, Western Maryland College Maryland 

Louis Yarid, A.B., Columbia University, 1956 Massachusetts 



54 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

DEANS OF DENTAL SCHOOLS IN BALTIMORE 

BALTIMORE COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 
(Founded 1840) 

Chapin A. Harris .„.., 1840—1841 

Thomas E. Bond „ 1841—1842 

Washington R. Handy,....- 1842 — 1853 

Philip H. Austen 1853—1865 

Ferdinand J. S. Gorgas 1865—1882 

Richard B. Winder. 1882 — 1894 

M. Whilldin Foster, „ 1894 — 1914 

William G. Foster. 1914—1923 

MARYLAND DENTAL COLLEGE 
1873—1878 (Merged with B. C. D. S.) 

Richard B. Winder 1873—1878 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
(Founded 1882) 

Ferdinand J. S. Gorgas 1882—1911 

Timothy O. Heatwole. 1911—1923 

BALTIMORE MEDICAL COLLEGE 
1895—1913 (Merged with U. of Md.) 

J. William Smith 1895—1901 

William A. Montell 1901—1903 

J. Edgar Orrison 1903—1904 

J. William Smith + 1904—1913 

BALTIMORE COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 

DENTAL SCHOOL 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

(B. C. D. S. Joined the U. of Md. 1923) 

Timothy O. Heatwole ......1923—1924 

J. Ben Robinson 1924-^1953 

Myron S. Aisenberg (Acting) 1953 

Myron S. Aisenberg 1954 — present 



THE SCHOOL OF 

dentistry 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
AT BALTIMORE 



VOL.118 1958 



NO. 11 



1958 



1959 



JANUARY 1958 

S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 

FEBRUARY 

S M T W T F S 

1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 



MARCH 

S M T W T F S 

1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 

APRIL 

5 M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 

MAY 

S M T W T F S 
12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 



JUNE 

S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 



JULY 1958 

5 M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 

AUGUST 

S M T W T F S 
1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 



SEPTEMBER 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 



OCTOBER 

S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 

NOVEMBER 

S M T W T F S 

1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 



DECEMBER 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 31 



JANUARY 1959 

.S M T W T F S 
12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 



FEBRUARY 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 



MARCH 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 31 



APRIL 



S M T 



T F S 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 

MAY 

S M T W T F S 
1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 

JUNE 

S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 



JULY 1959 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 
5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 31 

AUGUST 

S M T W T F S 

1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 

SEPTEMBER 

5 M T W T F S 

12 3 4 6 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 



OCTOBER 

S M T W 



T F S 
12 3 
8 9 10 

15 16 17 



4 5 6 7 
11 12 13 14 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 



NOVEMBER 

S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 



DECEMBER 

5 M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 



ONE HUNRED AND EIGHTEENTH CATALOGUE 

with 

Announcements For 
1 Tie 1958-1959 Session 




BALTIMORE COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 
DENTAL SCHOOL 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 



THE PROVISIONS of this publication are not to be regarded as an irrevocable con- 
tract between the student and the University or Maryland. The University reserves 
the right to change any provision or requirement at any time within the student's 
term of residence. The University further reserves the right at any time, to ask a 
student to withdraw when it considers such action to be in the best interests oi the 
University. 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

and 
MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE 

Term 
Expires 

Charles P. McCormick 

Chairman 1966 

McCormick and Company, 414 Light Street, Baltimore 2 

Edward F. Holtbr 

Vice-Chairman 1959 

The National Grange, 744 Jackson Place, N.W., Washington 6 

B. Herbert Brown 

Secretary I960 

The Baltimore Institute, 12 West Madison Street, Baltimore 1 

Harry H. Nuttle 

Treasurer 1966 

Denton 

Louis L. Kaplan 

Assistant Secretary 1961 

1201 Eutaw Place, Baltimore 17 

Edmund S. Burke 

Assistant Treasurer 1959 

Kelly-Springfield Tire Company, Cumberland 

Alvin L. Aubinoe 

1515 19th Street, N.W., Washington 6, D. C 1967 

Thomas W. Pangborn 1965 

The Pangborn Corporation, Pangborn Blvd., Hagerstown 

Enos S. Stockbridge 1960 

10 Light Street, Baltimore 2 

Thomas B. Symons 1963 

Suburban Trust Company, 6950 Carroll Avenue, Takoma Park 

C. EWTNG TUTTLE 1962 

907 Latrobe Building, Charles and Read Streets, Baltimore 2 



Members of the Board are appointed by the Governor of the State for terms of nine 
years each, beginning the first Monday in June. 

The President of the University of Maryland is, by law, Executive Officer of the 
Board. 

The State law provides that the Board of Regents of the University of Maryland 
shall constitute the Maryland State Board of Agriculture. 



University of Maryland 

ACADEMIC CALENDAR 
1958-1959 SESSION 
1958 

First Semester 

September 16 Tuesday Orientation Program for Freshman Class 

September 17 Wednesday . . . Registration for Freshman Class 

September 18 Thursday .... Registration for Sophomore Class 

September 19 Friday Registration for Junior and Senior Classes 

September 22 Monday Instruction begins with first scheduled period 

November 25 Tuesday Thanksgiving recess begins at close of last 

scheduled period 

December 1 Monday Instruction resumes with first scheduled period 

December 19 Friday Christmas recess begins at close of last 

scheduled period 

1959 

January 5 Monday Instruction resumes with first scheduled period 

January 22 Thursday, 

and 23 Friday Second Semester Registration 

January 30 Friday First Semester ends at the close of last 

scheduled period 

Second Semester 

February 2 Monday Instruction begins with first scheduled period 

February 23 Monday Washington's Birthday— holiday 

March 26 Thursday .... Easter recess begins at close of last scheduled 

. period 

March 31 Tuesday Instruction resumes with first scheduled period 

June 3 Wednesday . . . Second Semester ends at close of last scheduled 

period 

June 6 Saturday Commencement 



A student who registers after instruction begins must pay a late registration fee of 
$5.00. No late registration will be approved after Saturday of the first week of instruc- 
tion. 



School of Dentistry 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

vvilson homer elkins, President of the University 

B.A., M.A., B.LITT., D.PHIL. 

MYRON S. AISENBERG, Dean 
D.D.S. 

Katharine toomey, Administrative Assistant 

G. watson algire, Director of Admissions and Registrations 

B.A., M.S. 

norma J. azlein, Registrar 
b.a. 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 
1957-1958 SESSION 
Emeritus 
j. ben robinson, Dean Emeritus 

D.D.S., D.SC. 

Professors 

myron s. aisenberg, Professor of Pathology 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1922. 

Joseph calton BiDDix, jr., Professor of Oral Diagnosis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1934. 

edward c. dobbs, Professor of Pharmacology and Therapeutics 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1929; b.s., 1952. 

brice marden dorsey, Professor of Oral Surgery 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1927. 

Gardner Patrick henry Foley, Professor of Dental Literature 
b.a., Clark University, 1923; m.a., 1926. 

grayson wilbur gaver, Professor of Dental Prosthesis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1922. 

William edward hahn, Professor of Anatomy 

d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1931; a.b., University of Rochester, 1938; m.s., 1939. 

jose E. Medina, Professor of Operative Dentistry 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1948. 

ernest b. nuttall, Professor of Fixed Partial Prosthesis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1931. 



University of Maryland 

Robert harold oster, Professor of Physiology 

b.s., The Pennsylvania State University, 1923; M.S., 1926; ph.d., Harvard Uni- 
versity, 1933. 

kyrle w. preis, Professor of Orthodontics 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1929. 

d. vincent provenza, Professor of Histology and Embryology 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1939; M.S., 1941; ph.d., 1952. 

donald E. shay, Professor of Microbiology 

b.s., Lebanon Valley College, 1937; m.s., University of Maryland, 1938; ph.d., 1943. 

e. g. vanden bosche, Professor of Biochemistry 

a.b., Lebanon Valley College, 1922; m.s., University of Maryland, 1924; ph.d., 1927. 

Associate Professors 

william robert biddington, Associate Professor of Oral Medicine 
d.d.s. , University of Maryland, 1948. 

Joseph Patrick cappuccio, Associate Professor of Oral Surgery 

b.s., University of Rhode Island, 1943; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1946. 

Stanley h. dosh, Associate Professor of Fixed Partial Prosthesis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1935. 

* harold golton, Associate Professor of Oral Diagnosis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1925. 

george mclean, Associate Professor of Physical Diagnosis and Principles of 
Medicine 

m.d., University of Maryland, 1916. 

peter mclean lu, Associate Professor of Fixed Partial Prosthesis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1934. 

WALTER L. oggesen, Associate Professor of Fixed Partial Prosthesis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1926. 

wilbur owen ramsey, Associate Professor of Dental Prosthesis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1943. 

douglas john sanders, Associate Professor of Pedodontics 
b.s., Northwestern University, 1946; d.d.s., 1948. 

guy paul Thompson, Associate Professor of Anatomy 
a.b., West Virginia University, 1923; a.m., 1929. 

l. edward warner, Associate Professor of Dental Prosthesis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1931. 



* Leave of absence. 
4 



School of Dentistry 

Tobias Weinberg, Associate Professor of Pathology 
a.b., The Johns Hopkins University, 1930; m.d., 1933. 

Assistant Professors 

irving I. abramsc-n, Assistant Professor of Oral Medicine 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1932. 

alvin david aisenberg, Assistant Professor of Pathology 
d.d.s. , University of Maryland, 1945. 

hugh if. clement, jr., Assistant Professor of Operative Dentistry 
d.d.s., University or Maryland, 1944. 

calvin Joseph gaver, Assistant Professor of Operative Dentistry 
e.s., University or Maryland, 1950; d.d.s., 1954. 

conrad l. inman, Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology 
d.d.s., Baltimore College or' Dental Surgery, 1915. 

William kress, Assistant Professor of Orthodontics 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1936. 

yam-hin louie, Assistant Professor of Operative Dentistry ' 

b.s., Lingnan University, Canton, China, 1938; d.d.s., Northwestern University, 
1945; m.s.d., 1946. 

burton Robert pollack, Assistant Professor of Physiology 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1946. 

daniel edward shehan, Assistant Professor of Orthodontics 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1922. 

E. Roderick shipley, Assistant Professor of Physiology 

a.b., The Johns Hopkins University, 1938; m.d., University of Maryland, 1942. 

Arthur g. siwinski, Assistant Professor of Oral Surgery 

a.b., The Johns Hopkins University, 1927; m.d., University of Maryland, 1931. 

d. Robert swinehart, Assistant Professor of Orthodontics 

a.b., Dartmouth College, 1933; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1937. 

edmond g. vanden bosche, Assistant Professor of Tooth Morphology 

b.s., The Pennsylvania State University, 1943; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1947. 

Special Lecturers 

martin helrich, Professor of Anesthesiology {School of Medicine') 
b.s., Dickinson College, 1946; m.d., University of Pennsylvania, 1946. 

richard llndenberg, Lecturer in Neuroanatomy 
m.d., University of Berlin, 1944. 

ethelbert lovett, Lecturer in Ethics 

d.d.s., Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, 1922. 



University of Maryland 

William j. o'donnell, Lecturer in jurisprudence 

a.b., Loyola College, 1937; ll.b., University of Maryland, 1941. 

harry m. robinson, jr., Professor of Dermatology {School of Medicme) 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1931; m.d., 1935. 

george herschel yeager, Professor of Clinical Surgery (School of Medicine') 
b.s., West Virginia University, 1927; m.d., University of Maryland, 1929. 

c. Richard fravel, Lecturer in Principles of Medicine 
m.d., University of Maryland, 1949. 

Instructors 

Robert l. bartlett, Instructor in Operative Dentistry 

b.a., The Johns Hopkins University, 1953; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1957. 

sterrett p. beaven, Instructor in Operative Dentistry 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1941. 

Stanley l. brown, Instructor in Pharmacology and Therapeutics 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1952; d.d.s., 1956. 

samuel hollinger bryant, Instructor in Oral Diagnosis 

a.b., Western Maryland College, 1928; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1932. 

Thomas F. clement, Instructor in Oral Medicine 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1951. 

jerome s. cullen, Instructor in Clinical Orthodontics 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1941. 

John j. demartin, Instructor in Full Denture Prosthesis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1957. 

Robert e. demartin, Instructor in Roentgenology 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1957. 

fred ehrlich, Instructor in Pedodontics 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1947. 

ralph jack Gordon, Instructor in Dental Prosthesis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1933. 

marvin m. graham, Instructor in Fixed Partial Prosthesis 

a.b., Cornell University, 1938; a.m., 1939; d.d.s., University of Pennsylvania, 1943. 

William lee graham, Instructor in Oral Diagnosis 

b.s., Marietta College, 1948; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1953. 

Walter granruth, jr., Instructor in Pathology 

b.s., Loyola College, 1950; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1954. 

M. Eugene hinds, Instructor in Oral Surgery 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1952. 



School of Dentistry 

john M. hyson, Instructor in Oral Surgery 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1950. 

gerald m. isbell, jr., Instructor in Roentgenology 
d.d.s. , University of Maryland, 1957. 

melvin john jagielski, Instructor in Tooth Morphology 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1953. 

vernon d. kaufman, Instructor in Oral Surgery 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1936. 

lester lebo, Instructor in Oral Diagnosis 
b.s., University of Chicago, 1938; m.d., 1941. 

richard r. c. Leonard, Instructor in Public Health Dentistry 

d.d.s., Indiana University, 1922; m.s.p.h., University of Michigan, 1944. 

Charles E. loveman, Instructor in Anatomy 

a.b., The Johns Hopkins University, 1935; d.d.s., Columbia University, 1939. 

martin h. morris, Instructor in Biochemistry 
b.s., Rutgers University, 1952; M.S., 1954. 

james p. norris, Instructor in Oral Medicine 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1950; d.d.s., 1956. 

frank n. ogden, Instructor in First Aid and in Charge of Medical Care of Stu- 
dents 

m.d., University of Maryland, 1917. 

victor s. primrose, Instructor in Full Denture Prosthesis 
d.d.s., McGill University, 1918. 

Norton morris ross, Instructor in Pharmacology 

b.s., University of Connecticut, 1949; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1954. 

myron hillard sachs, Instructor in Anatomy 
d.d.s., Columbia University, 1939. 

aaron schaeffer, Instructor in Clinical Orthodontics 

b.a., Western Maryland College, 1939; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1947; M.S., 
University of Illinois, 1948. 

frank J. srNNREiCH, jr., Instructor in Anatomy 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1951. 

glenn d. Steele, Instructor in Fixed Partial Prosthesis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1942. 

claude p. taylor, Instructor in Visual Aids 

john d. vachon, Instructor in Operative Dentistry 

a.b., West Virginia University; m.s., 1953; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1957. 

earle Harris watson, Instructor in Dental Materials and Dental Prosthesis 
a.b., University of Xorth Carolina, 1938; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1942. 

7 ► 



University of Maryland 

david h. willer, Instructor in Full Denture Prosthesis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1933. 

Graduate Assistants 

john F. black, Graduate Assistant in Oral Surgery 
d.d.s. , University of Maryland, 1957. 

mcdonald k. Hamilton, Graduate Assistant in General and Oral Pathology 
b.a., Alma College, 1952; d.d.s., University of Michigan, 1956. 

john j. Jordan, Graduate Assistant in Histology and Embryology 
b.s., University of Scranton, 1957. 

Charles brown Leonard, jr., Graduate Assistant in Biochemistry 
b.a., Rutgers College of South Jersey, 1955. 

john c mueller, Graduate Assistant in Oral Surgery 

a.b., Duke University, 1953; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1957. 

victor J. vilk, Graduate Assistant in Bacteriology 
b.a., Montana State University, 1951; m.a., 1954. 

john t. welch, Graduate Assistant in Oral Surgery 

a.b., West Virginia University, 1949; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1954. 

Library Staff 

IDA marian robinson, Librarian and Associate Professor of Library Science 

a.b., Cornell University, 1924; b.s.l.s., Columbia University School of Library 
Service, 1944. 

Hilda e. moore, Associate Librarian and Assistant Professor of Library Science 
a.b., Randolph-Macon Woman's College, 1936; a.b.l.s., Emory University Library 
School, 1937. 

Beatrice marriott, Reference Librarian 
a.b., University of Maryland, 1944. 

edith m. coyle, Periodicals Librarian 

a.b., University of North Carolina, 1937; a.b.l.s., University of North Carolina 
School of Library Science, 1939; m.a., The Johns Hopkins University, 1945. 

harriette w. shelton, Chief Cataloguer 

b.a., The Pennsylvania State College, 1935; b.s.l.s., Columbia University School of 
Library Service, 1937. 

marjorie fluck, Cataloguer 

b.s. im ed., Kutztown State Teachers College, 1952. - 

Rosalie c. carroll, Library Assistant 

Elizabeth E. mccoach, Assistant to the Librarian 

patricia c. terzi, Assistant to the Cataloguer 



School of Dentistry 

THE SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 

History 

The Baltimore college of dental surgery occupies an important and 
interesting place in the history of dentistry. At the end of the regular ses- 
sion— 1957-58— it completed its one hundred and eighteenth year of service to 
dental education. The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery represents the first 
effort in history to offer institutional dental education to those anticipating the 
practice of dentistry. 

The first lectures on dentistry in America were delivered by Dr. Horace 
H. Hayden in the University of Maryland, School of Medicine, between the 
years 1S23-25. These lectures were interrupted in 1825 by internal dissensions 
in the School of Medicine and were as a consequence discontinued. It was Dr. 
Hayden's idea that dental education merited greater attention than had been 
given it by medicine or could be given it by the preceptorial plan of dental 
teaching then in vogue. 

Dr. Horace H. Hayden began the practice of dentistry in Baltimore in 1800. 
From that time he made a zealous attempt to lay the foundation for a scientific, 
serviceable dental profession. In 1831 Dr. Chapin A. Harris came to Baltimore 
to study under Hayden. Dr. Harris was a man of unusual ability and possessed 
special qualifications to aid in establishing and promoting formal dental educa- 
tion. Since Dr. Hayden's lectures had been interrupted at the University of 
Mar)- land and there was an apparent unsurmountable difficulty confronting the 
creation of dental departments in medical schools, an independent college was 
decided upon. A charter was applied for and granted by the Maryland Legis- 
lature February 1, 1840. The first Faculty meeting was held February 3, 1840, 
at which time Dr. Horace H. Hayden was elected President and Dr. Chapin A. 
Harris, Dean. The introductory lecture was delivered by Dr. Hayden on Novem- 
ber 3, 1840, to the five students matriculating in the first class. Thus was 
created as the foundation of the present dental profession the Baltimore College 
of Dental Surgery, the first dental school in the world. 

Hayden and Harris, the admitted founders of conventional dental education, 
contributed, in addition to the factor of dental education, other opportunities for 
professional growth and development. In 1839 the American Journal of Dental 
Science was founded, with Chapin A. Harris as its editor. Dr. Harris continued 
fully responsible for dentistry's initial venture into periodic dental literature to 
the time of his death. The files of the old American Journal of Dental Science 
testify to the fine contributions made by Dr. Harris. In 1840 the American 
Society of Dental Surgeons was founded, with Dr. Horace H. Hayden as its 
President and Dr. Chapin A. Harris as its Corresponding Secretary. This was 
the beginning of dental organization in America, and was the forerunner of the 
American Dental Association, which now numbers approximately eighty-four 
thousand in its present membership. The foregoing suggests the unusual in- 
fluence Baltimore dentists and the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery have 
exercised on professional ideals and policies. 



University of Maryland 

In 1873, the Maryland Dental College, an offspring of the Baltimore College 
of Dental Surgery, was organized. It continued instruction until 1878, at which 
time it was consolidated with the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery. A de- 
partment of dentistry was organized at the University of Maryland in the year 
1882, graduating a class each year from 1883 to 1923. This school was chartered 
as a corporation and continued as a privately owned and directed institution until 
1920, when it became a State institution. The Dental Department of the Balti- 
more Medical College was established in 1895, continuing until 1913, when it 
merged with the Dental Department of the University of Maryland. 

The final combining of the dental educational interests of Baltimore was 
effected June 15, 1923, by the amalgamation of the student bodies of the Balti- 
more College of Dental Surgery and the University of Maryland, School of 
Dentistry; the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery becoming a distinct depart- 
ment of the University under State supervision and control. Thus we find in the 
Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, University of Maryland, a 
merging of the various efforts at dental education in Maryland. From these 
component elements have radiated developments of the art and science of dentis- 
try until the strength of its alumni is second to none, in either number or degree 
of service to the profession. 

Library 

This School is fortunate in having one of the better equipped and organized 
libraries among the dental schools of the country. The library is located in the 
main building and consists of a stack room, offices and a reading room accom- 
modating ninety-six students. Over 16,000 books and bound journals on dentistry 
and the collateral sciences, together with numerous pamphlets, reprints and un- 
bound journals, are available for the student's use. More than 200 journals are 
regularly received by the Library. An adequate staff promotes the growth of 
the Library and assists the student body in the use of the Library's resources. 
One of the most important factors of the dental student's education is to teach 
him the value and the use of dental literature in his formal education and in 
promoting his usefulness and value to the profession during practice. The Balti- 
more College of Dental Surgery is ideally equipped to achieve this aim of dental 
instruction. 



Course of Instruction 

The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, University of 
Maryland offers a course in dentistry devoted to instruction in the medical 
sciences, the dental sciences, and clinical practice. Instruction consists of didactic 
lectures, laboratory instruction, demonstrations, conferences, quizzes and hos- 
pital ward rounds. Topics are assigned for collateral reading to train the student 
in the value and use of dental literature. The curriculum for the complete 
course appears on pages 20 and 21 of this catalogue. 

«« 10 



School of Dentistry 

Requirements for Admission 

Applicants for admission must present evidence of having completed success- 
fully two academic years of work in an accredited college of arts and sciences 
based upon the completion of a four-year high school course or the equivalent 
in entrance examinations. The college course must include at least a year's 
credit in English, in biology, in physics, in inorganic chemistry, and in organic 
chemistry. All required science courses shall include both classroom and labor- 
atory instruction. Although a minimum of 60 semester hours of credit, exclusive 
of physical education and military science, is required, additional courses in the 
humanities and the natural and social sciences are desirable. By ruling of the 
Dean's Council, all admission requirements must be completed by June 30 previ- 
ous to the desired date of admission. 

In considering candidates for admission, the Board of Admissions will give 
preference to those applicants who have high scholastic records in secondary 
school and in college; who make satisfactory scores in the dental aptitude test; 
who present favorable recommendations from their respective predental com- 
mittee or from one instructor in each of the departments of biology, chemistry,, 
and physics; and who, in all other respects, give every promise of becoming suc- 
cessful students and dentists of high standing. Applicants will not be admitted 
with unabsolved conditions or unabsolved failures. 

Combined Arts and Sciences-Dental Program 

The University offers a combined arts and sciences-dental curriculum lead- 
ing to the degrees of Bachelor of Science and Doctor of Dental Surgery. The 
preprofessional part of this curriculum shall be taken in residence in the College 
of Arts and Sciences at College Park, and the professional part in the School of 
Dentistry in Baltimore. 

Students who elect the combined program and who have completed the arts 
and sciences phase of it may, upon the recommendation of the Dean of the 
School of Dentistry, be granted the degree of Bachelor of Science by the College 
of Arts and Sciences at the first summer commencement following the comple- 
tion of the student's first year in the School of Dentistry. A student may enter 
the arts and sciences-dental program at College Park with advanced standing 
from an accredited college or university, but the last year of the preprofessional 
training must be completed at College Park and the professional training must 
be completed in the School of Dentistry of the University of Maryland. 



11 



University of Maryland 



ARTS-DENTISTRY CURRICULUM 

, — Semester- 
Freshman Year 1 11 

Eng. 1, 2— Composition and American Literature 3 3 

Zool. 1— General Zoology 4 

Zool. 2— Advanced General Zoology . . 4 

Chem. 1, 3— General Chemistry 4 4 

Math. 10, 11— Algebra, Trigonometry, Analytic Geometry.... 3 3 

Speech 18, 1 9— Introductory Speech 1 1 

Physical Activities 1 1 

A. S. 1, 2-Basic Air Force ROTC (Men) 3 3 

Hea. 2, 4-Hygiene (Women) 2 2 

Total 18-19 18-19 

Sophomore Year 

Eng. 3, 4 or 5, 6— Composition and World or English 

Literature 3 3 

Soc. 1— Sociology or American Lite ^| 

and L 3 3 

G. & P. 1— American Government J 

Chem. 35, 36, 37, 38-Organic Chemistry 4 4 

*H. 5, 6— History or American Civilization 3 3 

fModern Language 3 3 

Physical Activities 1 1 

A. S. 3, 4-Basic Air Force ROTC (Men) 3 3 

Total 17-20 17-20 

Junior Year 

Modern Language (continued) 3 3 

Phys. 10, 1 1— Fundamentals of Physics 4 4 

Approved Minor Courses 9 9 

Electives 3 3 

Total 19 19 



Senior Year 

The curriculum of the first year of the School of Dentistry of the University 
of Maryland is accepted by the College of Arts and Sciences as the fourth year 
(major sequence) of academic work toward the degree of Bachelor of Science. 



* Students planning to request admission to the Dental School with only two years 
of predental training should take Physics 10-11. 

fFr. or Ger. 6, 7— Intermediate Scientific French or German recommended. 



12 



School of Dentistry 

If at the end of the junior year the student decides to postpone his entrance 
to the School of Dentistry and to remain in the College of Arts and Sciences 
and complete work for the Bachelor's degree, he may choose a major and minor 
in any of the departments in which he has completed the necessary underclass 
requirements. The general nature of the first three years of this curriculum and 
the generous electives of the third year make possible for the student a wide 
choice of departments in which he may specialize. In general the electives of 
the third year will be chosen as for a major in some particular department. 

Requirements for Matriculation and Enrollment 

In the selection of students to begin the study of dentistry the School con- 
siders particularly a candidate's proved ability in secondary education and his 
successful completion of prescribed courses in predental collegiate training. The 
requirements for admission and the academic regulations of the College of Arts 
and Sciences, University of Maryland, are strictly adhered to by the School of 
Dentistry. 

A student is not regarded as having matriculated in the School of Dentistry 
until such time as he shall have paid the matriculation fee of $10.00, and is not 
enrolled until he shall have paid a deposit of $200.00. This deposit is intended 
to insure registration in the class and is not returnable. 

Application Procedures 

Candidates seeking admission to the Dental School should first write to 
the Office of the Dean requesting a preliminary information form. Upon the 
receipt and the examination of this form by the Board of Admissions an applica- 
tion blank will be sent to those candidates who merit consideration. Each appli- 
cant should fill out the blank in its entirety and mail it promptly, together with 
the application fee and photographs, to the Board of Admissions, Dental 
School, University of Maryland, Baltimore 1, Maryland. The early filing of an 
application is urged. Applicants wishing advice on any problem relating to their 
predental training or their application should communicate with the Board of 
Admissions. 

All applicants will be required to take the Dental Aptitude Test. This test 
will be given at various testing centers throughout the United States, its pos- 
sessions and Canada. Applicants will be notified by the Council on Dental Educa- 
tion of the American Dental Association of the dates of the tests and the locations 
cf the testing centers. 

Promising candidates will be required to appear before the Board of Ad- 
missions for an interview. On the basis of all available information the best 
possible applicants will be chosen for admission to the School. 

A certificate of entrance will be issued to each successful applicant, which will 
permit him to matriculate and to register in the class to which he has applied. 

13 ► 



University of Maryland 

Admission with Advanced Standing 

(a) Graduates in medicine or students in medicine who have completed two 
or more years in a medical school, acceptable to standards in the School of 
Medicine, University of Maryland, may be given advanced standing to the 
Sophomore year provided the applicant shall complete under competent regu- 
lar instruction the courses in dental technology regularly scheduled in the first 
year. 

(b) Applicants for transfer must (1) meet fully the requirements for 
admission to the first year of the dental course; (2) be eligible for promotion to 
the next higher class in the school from which he seeks to transfer; (3) show an 
average grade of five per cent above the passing mark in the school where transfer 
credits were earned; (4) show evidence of scholastic attainments, character and 
personality; (5) present letter of honorable dismissal and recommendation from 
the dean of the school from which he transfers. 

(c) All applicants for transfer must present themselves in person for an 
interview before qualifying certificate can be issued. 

Attendance Requirements 

In order to receive credit for a full session, each student must have entered 
and be in attendance on the day the regular session opens, at which time lectures 
to all classes begin, and remain until the close of the session, the dates for which 
are announced in the calendar of the annual catalogue. 



o 



Regular attendance is demanded. A student whose attendance in any course 
is unsatisfactory to the head of the department will be denied the privilege of 
final examination in any and all such courses. A student with less than 85 per 
cent attendance will not be promoted to the next succeeding year. However, 
in certain unavoidable circumstances of absences, the Dean and the Council 
may honor excuses exceeding the maximum permitted. 

Grading and Promotion 

The following symbols are used as marks for final grades: A (100-91), 
B (90-84), C (83-77), and D (76-70), Passing; F (below 70), Failure; I, In- 
complete. Progress grades in courses are indicated as "Satisfactory" and "Un- 
satisfactory." 

A Failure in any subject may be removed only by repeating the subject in full. 
Students who have done work of acceptable quality in their completed assign- 
ments but who, because of circumstances beyond their control, have been unable 
to finish all assignments, will be given an Incomplete. A student shall not carry 
an Incomplete into the next succeeding year. When he has completed the 
requirements for the removal of an Incomplete, the student shall be given 
the actual grade earned in the course. 

^ 14 



School of Dentistry 

Scholastic averages are computed on the basis of semester credits assigned to 
each course and numerical values for grades. The numerical values are A-4; 
B-3; C-2; D-l; F-0. The grade point average is the sum of the products of 
semester credits and grade values, divided by the total number of semester credits. 

Students who attain a grade point average of 1.5 in the Freshman year will 
be promoted. At the end of the Sophomore year an overall grade point average 
of 1.75 is required for promotion. A grade point average of 2.0 is required for 
promotion to the Senior year and for graduation. 

Students who fail to meet the minimum grade point averages required for 
promotion and who fall into the following categories will be allowed proba- 
tionary promotion: 

1. Freshmen who attain a grade point average of 1.25-1.49. 

2. Sophomores who attain an overall grade point average of 1.6-1.74. 

3. Juniors who attain an overall grade point average of 1.85-1.99. 

Probationary status will not be permitted for two successive years. 

A student may absolve a total of eight credit hours of failure in an ac- 
credited summer school provided he has the grade point average required for 
promotion or graduation, excluding the failure or failures which he has incurred. 

Equipment 

A complete list of necessary instruments and materials for technic and clinic 
courses is prescribed by the Dental School. Arrangements are made by the 
Dental School in advance of formal enrollment for books, instruments and ma- 
terials to be delivered to the students at the opening of school. Each student is 
required to provide himself promptly with these prescribed necessities. A student 
who does not meet this requirement will not be permitted to continue with his 
class. 



Deportment 

The profession of dentistry demands, and the School of Dentistry requires, 
of its students evidence of their good moral character. The conduct of the 
student in relation to his work and fellow students will indicate his fitness to 
be taken into the confidence of the community as a professional man. Integrity, 
sobriety, temperate habits, truthfulness, respect for authority and associates and 
honesty in the transaction of business affairs as a student will be considered as 
evidence of good moral character necessary to the granting of a degree. 

Requirements for Graduation 

The degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery is conferred upon a candidate who 
has met the following conditions: 

15 ► 



University of Maryland 

1. A candidate must furnish documentary evidence that he has attained 
the age of 21 years. 

2. A candidate for graduation shall have attended the full scheduled course 
of four academic years. 

3. He will be required to show a grade point average of 2.0 for the full 
course of study. 

4. He shall have satisfied all technic and clinic requirements of the various 
departments. 

5. He shall have paid all indebtedness to the college prior to the beginning 
of final examinations, and must have adjusted his financial obligations in the 
community satisfactorily to those to whom he may be indebted. 

Fees 

Matriculation fee (required of all entering students) $ 10.00 

Tuition (each year): 

Non-resident student 675.00 

Resident student . 400.00 

Student health service (each year) 20.00 

Special fee 30.00 

The Special Fee is payable by all full-time students enrolled 
in the Professional Schools on the Baltimore campus. Proceeds 
from the Special Fee will be used to finance the equipment needed 
for the Baltimore Union Building. 
Laboratory breakage deposit: 

Freshman year 10.00 

Sophomore and Junior years 5.00 

In addition to fees itemized in the above schedule, the following assess- 
ments are made by the University: 
Application fee (paid at time of filing formal application for admission) 7.50 

Late registration fee 5.00 

(All students are expected to complete their registration, including 
payment of bills, on the regular registration days.) Those who do 
not complete their registration during the prescribed days will be 
charged a fee of $5.00. 

Examinations taken out of class and re-examinations 5.00 

One certified transcript of record is issued free of charge. 

Each additional copy is issued only upon payment of 1.00 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES FEE — SPECIAL 

For the purpose of administering various student activities, the Student 
Senate, after approval by the separate classes and the Faculty Council, voted 
a fee of $12.50 to be paid at the time of registration to the Office of the Dean. 

M 16 



School of Dentistry 



REFUNDS 



According to the policy of the University no fees will be returned. In case 
the student discontinues his course or fails to register after a place has been 
reserved in a class, any fees paid will be credited to a subsequent course, but? 
are not transferable. 

Registration 

o 

The registration of a student in any school or college of the University 
shall be regarded as a registration in the University of Maryland, but when 
such student transfers to a professional school of the University or from one 
professional school to another, he must pay the usual matriculation fee required 
by each professional school. 

Each student is required to fill in a registration card for the office of the 
Registrar, and make payment of one-half of the tuition fee in addition to all 
other fees noted as payable before being admitted to classwork at the opening 
of the session. The remainder of tuition and fees must be in the hands of the 
Comptroller during registration period for the second half of the academic year. 

Definition of Residence and Non-Residence 

Students who are minors are considered to be resident students if at the 
time of their registration their parents have been domiciled in this state for 
at least one year. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of his 
first registration in the University, and may not thereafter be changed by him 
unless, in the case of a minor, his parents move to and become legal residents 
of the state by maintaining such residence for at least one full year. How- 
ever, the right of the minor student to change from a non-resident to resident 
status must be established by him prior to the registration period for any 
semester. 

Adult students are considered to be resident if at the time of their regis- 
tration they have been domiciled in this state for at least one year, provided 
such residence has not been acquired while attending any school or college in 
Maryland or elsewhere. 

The word domicile as used in this regulation shall mean the permanent 
place of abode. For the purpose of this rule only one domicile may be claimed 
as a permanent abode. 

Student Health Service 

The School undertakes to supply medical and surgical care for its students 
through the Student Health Service. This care includes the daily services 

17 ► 



University of Maryland 

rendered by a physician and a graduate nurse in a well-equipped clinic, conven- 
iently located in the Dental School. Also consultations, surgical procedures and 
hospitalization, judged to be necessary by the Service, are covered under liberal 
limitations, depending on length of hospitalization and special expenses incurred. 

Students who need medical attention are expected to report at the office 
of the Student Health Service. Under circumstances requiring home treatment, 
the students will be visited at their College residences. 

It is not within the scope of the Service to provide medical care for con- 
ditions antedating each annual registration in the University; nor is it the 
function of this Service to treat chronic conditions contracted by students before 
admission or to extend treatment to acute conditions developing in the period 
between academic years or during authorized school vacations. The cost of 
orthopedic applicances, the correction of visual defects, the services of special 
nurses, and special medication must be paid for by the student. The School 
does not accept responsibility for illness or accident occurring away from the 
community, or for expenses incurred for hospitalization or medical services in 
institutions other than the University Hospital, or, in any case, for medical 
expense not authorized by the Student Health Service. 

Every new student is required to undergo a complete physical examination, 
which includes oral diagnosis. Any defects noted must be corrected within the 
first school year. The passing of this examination is a requirement for the final 
acceptance of any student. 

Each matriculant must present, on the day of his enrollment, a statement 
from his ophthalmologist regarding the condition of his eyes, and where defects 
in vision exist he shall show evidence that corrections have been made. 

If a student should enter the hospital during the academic year, the Service 
will arrange for the payment of part or all of the hospital expenses, depending 
on the length of stay and the special expenses incurred. This arrangement applies 
only to students admitted through the office of the School physician. 

Prospective students are advised to have any known physical defects corrected 
before entering the School in order to prevent loss of time which later correction 
might involve. 

Scholarship and Loan Funds 

A number of scholarship loans from various organizations and educational 
foundations are available to students in the School of Dentistry. These loans 
are offered on the basis of excellence in scholastic attainment and the need on 
the part of students for assistance in completing their course in dentistry. It 
has been the policy of the Faculty to recommend only students in the last two 
years for such privileges. 

< 18 



School of Dentistry 

The Henry Strong Educational Foundation 

From this fund, established under the will of General Henry Strong of 
Chicago, an annual allotment is made to the Baltimore College of Dental 
Surgery, Dental School, University of Maryland, for scholarship loans available 
for the use of young men and women students under the age of twenty-five. 
Recommendations for the privileges of these loans are limited to students in the 
Junior and Senior years. Only students who through stress of circumstances 
require financial aid and who have demonstrated excellence in educational pro- 
gress are considered in making nominations to the secretary of this fund. 

The Edward S. Gaylord Educational Endowment Fund 

Under a provision of the will of the late Dr. Edward S. Gaylord, of New 
Haven, Connecticut, an amount approximating $16,000 was left to the Baltimore 
College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, University of Maryland, the proceeds 
of which are to be devoted to aiding worthy young men in securing dental 
education. 

The W. K. Kellogg Foundation 

During World War II the Foundation recognized the burden that the 
accelerated course imposed upon many dental students who under normal cir- 
cumstances would earn money for their education by employment during the 
summer vacation. The Foundation granted to this School a fund to provide 
rotating loans to deserving dental students. 

The Albert A. Harrington Fund 

This fund was established in 1954 by the New Jersey Alumni Association 
in memory of Dr. Albert A. Harrington, a member of the Class of 1910. The 
fund is a source of valuable help in aiding students to solve their temporary 
financial problems. 

The E. Benton Taylor Scholarship 

One of the finest scholarships in the field of dental education, the E. 
Benton Taylor Scholarship was conceived and arranged by Mrs. Taylor and 
will be perpetuated by the Luther B. Benton Company of Baltimore. It was 
put into operation in 1954 and will be awarded annually to a Maryland student 
of each entering class, who will continue to receive its benefits during the four 
years of his dental school course. 



19 



University of Maryland 






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21 ► 



University of Maryland 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 
ANATOMY 

Professor: Hahn (Head of Department). 

Associate Professor: Thompson. 

Assistant Professors: Edmond C. Vanden Bosche, and Piavis. 

Drs. Jagielski, Lindenberg, Loveman, and Sachs. 

Anat. 111. Human Gross Anatomy. (8) 

First year. This course consists of dissection and lectures, supplemented by frequent 
conferences and practical demonstrations. The entire human body is dissected. The 
subject is taught with the purpose of emphasizing the principles of the body structure, 
the knowledge of which is derived from a study of its organs and tissues, and the 
action of its parts. Arrangements can be made to accommodate qualified students 
and dentists interested in research or in making special dissections or topographical 
studies. 

Anat. 112. Human Neuroanatomy. (2) 

First year. Second semester. Prerequisite, Anatomy 111 or equivalent. Neuro- 
anatomy is offered in the Freshman year following Gross Anatomy. The work con- 
sists of a study of the whole brain and spinal cord by gross dissections and micro- 
scopic methods. Correlation is made, whenever possible, with the student's work 
in the histology and physiology of the central nervous system. 

Anat. 113. Comparative Tooth Morphology, (i) 

First year. Second semester. The course treats the evolutionary development of 
dentition as a necessary factor in the study of human oral anatomy. It includes a 
comparative study of the teeth of the animal kingdom, with a comparative study 
of the number, position and form of the teeth. 

Anat. 114. Tooth Morphology. (3) 

First year. Second semester. This course is designed to teach the form and functions 
and the relationships of the teeth, and includes a study of the nomenclature of sur- 
faces, divisions and relations of the teeth. In the laboratory the student is trained 
in the carving of the various teeth and in the dissection of extracted teeth through 
their various dimensions. 

The second part of the course includes a study of the supporting structures of 
the teeth and of the relation of the teeth to these structures. The periods of begin- 
ning calcificaion, eruption, complete calcification, and shedding of the deciduous 
teeth; followed by the periods of beginning calcification, eruption, and complete 
calcification of the permanent teeth, are studied and correlated with the growth in 
size of the jaws and face. 

For Graduates 

Anat. 211. Human Gross Anatomy. (8) 

Same as course 111 but with additional work on a more advanced level. 

* 22 



School of Dentistry 

Anat. 212. Human Neuroanatomy. (2) 

Same as course 112 but with additional instruction of a more advanced nature. 

Anat. 214. The Anatomy of the Head and Neck. (3) 

One conference and two laboratory periods per week for one semester. 

Anat. 216. Research. 

Credit determined by amount and quality of work performed. 

BIOCHEMISTRY 

Professor: Vanden Bosche (Head of Department). 
Mr. Morris and Mr. Leonard. 

Biochem. 111. Principles of Biocheynistry. (6) 

First year. Prerequisites inorganic and organic chemistry, with additional training 
in quantitative and physical chemistry desirable. Two lectures and one laboratory 
period throughout the year. The chemistry of living matter forms the basis of the 
course. The detailed subject matter includes the chemistry of carbohydrates, fats, 
proteins, enzymes, vitamins, and hormones. The processes of respiration, digestion, 
metabolism, secretion and excretion are considered. Laboratory instruction in quali- 
tative and quantitative blood and urine examination is included. 

For Graduates 

Biochem. 211. Advanced Biochemistry. (6) 

Prerequisite Biochemistry 111. Two lectures, one conference and one laboratory 

period throughout the year. 

Biochem. 212. Research in Bioche7nistry. 
Prerequisite Biochemistry 211. 

DENTAL HISTORY AND LITERATURE 

Professor: Foley (Head of Department). 

Lit. 121. Oral and Written Communication. (2) 

Second year. A formal course of lectures is given in the second year. Many aspects 
of the instruction are given practical application in the third and fourth years. 
The course has many purposes, all of them contributing to the training of the students 
for effective participation in the extra-practice activities of the profession. Particular 
attention is given to instruction in the functioning of the agencies of communication 
in dentistry: the dental societies and the dental periodicals. The practical phases of 
the course include a thorough study of the preparation and uses of oral and written 
composition by the dental student and the dentist; the use of libraries; the com- 
pilation of bibliographies; the collection, the organization, and the use of information; 
the management of dental meetings; the oral presentation of papers; and professional 
correspondence. 

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University of Maryland 

Lit. 141. Thesis. (2) 
Fourth year. 

Lit. 142. Dental History. (I) 

Fourth year. Second semester. Lectures in Dental History describe the beginnings of the 
art of dental practice among ancient civilizations, its advancement in relation to the de- 
velopment of the so-called medical sciences in the early civilizations, its struggle through 
the Middle Ages and, finally, its attainment of recognized professional status in modern 
times. Special attention is given to the forces and stresses that have brought about 
the evolutionary progress from a primitive dental art to a scientific health service 
profession. 

DENTAL PROSTHESIS 

A. Removable Complete and Partial Prosthesis 

Professor: G. Gaver (Jlead of Department). 

Associate Professors: Oggesen, Ramsey and Warner. 

Drs. ]. DeMartin, Gordon, Primrose, Smith, and Watson. 

Pros. Ilia. Dental Materials. (4) 

First year. This course is designed to provide the student with a scientific back- 
ground in the nomenclature, composition, physical properties, practical application, 
and proper manipulation of the important materials used in the practice of dentistry, 
excluding drugs and medicinals. 

The theoretical aspect of the course is presented in the form of lectures, demon- 
strations, informal group discussions, and directed supplemental reading. From 
the practical standpoint, the student manipulates and tests the various materials in 
the laboratory, being guided by prepared project sheets. The student develops an 
understanding of these factors: the importance of scientific testing of a material 
before it is used by the profession at large; the realization that every material has 
its limitations, which can be compensated for only by intelligent application and 
manipulation; and an appreciation of the vast field of research open to those who 
wish to improve the materials now available. 

Pros. 112a. Introduction to Complete Denture Prosthesis. (I) 
First year. Second semester. This course is devoted to the manipulation of impression 
compound and the procedures used in developing impressions of edentulous arches, 
casts and bite plates. It embraces a series of lecture-demonstrations designed to give the 
student a knowledge of the essential fundamentals in complete denture construc- 
tion. 

Pros. 121a. Complete Denture Prosthesis. (2) 

Second year. This course is given by lecture-demonstrations on bite registration, tooth 
arrangement, and final finish of complete dentures. 

Pros. 131a. Basic Clinical Complete Denture Prosthesis. (5) 

Third year. The course includes a study of the practical application in the clinic of 

the fundamentals taught in the preceding years. Demonstrations of the various 

^ 24 



School of Dentistry 

technics of impression and bite taking are offered to provide the student with addi- 
tional knowledge necessary for clinic work. 

Pros. 1 33a. Introduction to Removable Partial Denture Prosthesis. (1) 
Third year. Second semester. This lecture-demonstration course embraces all phases 
or removable partial denture construction. Experiments and exercises are arranged 
to give the student the fundamentals in designing, casting and finishing partial den- 
tures. 

Pros. 141a. Advanced Clinical Denture Prosthesis. (4) 

Fourth vear. This course consists of the clinical application of the fundamentals 

taught in the previous years. Particular attention is given to a standard method of 

denture construction to equip the student with a basic technic for use in private 

practice. 

B. Fixed Partial Prosthesis 

Professor: Nuttall QHead of Department). 

Associate Professors: Dosh, McLean-Lu and Oggesen. 

Drs. M. Graham, Steele, and Wilier. 

Pros. 122b. Principles of Fixed Partial Prosthesis. (6) 

Second year. This lecture and laboratory course is designed to provide a background 
of fundamental knowledge in fixed partial denture prosthesis. The interrelations 
of the biological and mechanical aspects of dentistry are emphasized. The prin- 
ciples involved and the procedures used in abutment preparations, the construction 
of fundamental retainers and pontic sections, and the assemblage of fixed bridge 
restorations are presented in detail and correlated with the requirements of occlusion. 
In addition to these procedures, the technics include impressions, wax manipulation, 
pattern construction, investing and casting. 

Pros. 132b. Ceramic and Plastic Piest orations. (2) 

Third year. First semester. This course presents the uses of porcelain and methyl 
methacrylate as restorative materials. Instruction is given in the procedures of 
preparation, impressions, color selection, temporary protection and cementation. These 
materials are employed in the construction of complete veneer crowns and dowel 
crowns and in staining and glazing technics. 

Pros. 134b. Basic Clinical Fixed Partial Prosthesis. (4) 

Third year. This is a comprehensive course in the essential requirements for the 
successful use of the fixed partial denture. Special consideration is given to funda- 
mental factors in diagnosis, treatment planning and clinical procedures. The course 
integrates biological factors, mechanical principles and esthetic requirements with 
restorative treatment. Emphasis is placed on the physiological considerations as a 
basis for fixed partial denture service. 

Pros. 142b. Advanced Clinical Fixed Partial Prosthesis. (3) 
Fourth year. This course provides clinical training and experience for the student. 
The acquired background of knowledge is utilized in rendering treatment services for 
patients. Experience is gained in assessing completely the dental problem, planning 

25 ► 



University of Maryland 

a practical treatment consistent with the total dental needs and providing services 
which satisfy the objectives of prevention, function and esthetics. 

DIAGNOSIS 

Professor: Biddix (Head of Department). 
Drs. Bryant, W. L. Graham, Lebo and Golton. 

Diag. 131. Principles of Oral Diagnosis and Treatment Planning. (2) 
Third year. The fundamental principles and procedures in the diagnosis of oral 
and related diseases are studied by intimate clinical observation and discussion of 
interesting cases. The study of the oral cavity through an understanding of its 
relation to other parts of the body is emphasized. By means of consultations with 
other departments the procedures of a comprehensive diagnosis are developed and 
applied in treatment planning. 

Diag. 132. Seminar. 

Third year. The objective of this course is to teach the student to correlate clinical, 
roentgenologic and laboratory findings. Selected patients are presented by both 
medical and dental teachers. 

Diag. 141. Clinical Oral Diagnosis and Treatment Planning. (I) 
Fourth year. This course is a continuation of Diagnosis 131 and 132. 

HISTOLOGY 

Professor: Provenza (^Acting Head of Department). 
Mr. Jordan. 

Hist. 111. Mammalian Histology and Embryology. (8) 

First year. The course embraces the thorough study of the cells, tissues and organs 
of the various systems of the human body. Although certain aspects of the dental 
histology phase of the course are given strictly as special entities, many are in- 
cluded in the instruction in general histology, since the two areas are so intimately 
related when functional and clinical applications are considered. The instruction in 
embryology is correlated with that in histology. It covers the fundamentals of de- 
velopment of the human body, particular emphasis being given to the head and 
facial regions, the oral cavity, and the teeth and their adnexa. Specific correlations 
are also made with the other courses in the dental curriculum. 

For Graduates 

Hist. 212. Mammalian Histology and Embryology. (6) 

This course is the same as Histology 111, except that it does not include the dental 
phases of 111, but does include additional instruction and collateral reading of an 
advanced nature. 

Hist. 213. Mammalian Oral Histology and Embryology. (2) 

Prerequisite, Histology 111 or 212, or an equivalent course. This course covers the 

dental aspects of Histology 111, and includes additional instruction in the relations 

< 26 



School of Dentistry 

of histologic structure and embryologic development of the teeth, their adnexa, and 
the head and facial regions of the human body. 

Hist. 214. Research in Histology. 
Number of hours and credit by arrangement. 

Hist. 2 J 5. Research in Embryology. 
Number of hours and credit by arrangement. 



iMEDICINE 

A. General Medicine 

Associate Professor: McLean. 
Drs. Travel, Leonard and Ogden. 

Med. 12 la. First Aid. 

Second year. Second semester. In this course the student is instructed in the basic 

principles of first aid. 

Med. 132a. Principles of Medicine. (2) 

Third year. The course is taught by lectures, visual aids and x-ray demonstrations 
of diseases of the cardio-respiratory, gastrointestinal, genitourinary and nervous sys- 
tems. 

Med. 141a. Physical Diagnosis. (I) 

Fourth year. Second semester. Slides and clinical demonstrations are used to show 
the methods of recognition of important objective signs as they relate to body dis- 
turbances. The methods of taking blood pressure are also taught. 

Med. 142a. Principles of Medicine. (2) 

Fourth year. Throughout the year the entire class is taken into the hospital for 
medical clinics where the close application of medical and dental knowledge in 
history taking, diagnosis, laboratory procedures and treatment is emphasized. 

Med. 143a. Preventive and Public Health Dentistry. (2) 

Fourth year. Second semester. The objectives of this course are to emphasize those 
measures other than remedial operations that will tend to minimize the occurrence 
or the extension of oral disease, and to outline the status of dentistry in the field of 
general public health. The relations of dentistry with other phases of public health 
are discussed, as are the problems affecting the administration of dental health pro- 
grams. Special effort is made to demonstrate methods and materials suitable for use 
in dental health education programs. 

Med. 144a. Clinical Conferences. 

Fourth year. Throughout the year small groups of students are taken into the hos- 
pital for medical ward rounds, demonstrations and discussions. 

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University of Maryland 



B. Oral Medicine 



Associate Professor: Biddington. 
Assistant Professor: Ahramson, 
Drs. T. F. Clement and Norris. 

Med. 121b. Principles of Endodontics. (I) 

Second year. The lecture phase presents the fundamentals necessary for an under- 
standing of the endodonic procedures, the indications and contraindications for main- 
taining pathologically affected teeth, and the various methods used in performing the 
necessary steps to prevent the loss of such teeth. The laboratory phase is designed 
to acquaint the student with the technics employed to prevent the loss of pathologi- 
cally involved teeth. 

Med. 122b. Introduction to Periodontics. (I) 

Second year. The lectures place special emphasis on the importance of oral hygiene 
and its relation to the prevention of all dental (disorders. The causes, results, and 
treatment of unhygienic conditions of the oral cavity are fully considered. Demon- 
strations are given in the prophylactic treatment of the mouth and in the accepted 
methods of tooth brushing to be used in home care. In the laboratory the student 
learns on special manikins the use of the periodontal instruments. By progressive 
exercises and drills he is taught the basic principles of good operating procedure and 
the methods of thorough prophylactic treatment. 

Med. 131b. Basic Clinical Endodontics, (i) 

Third year. During the Junior year, the student applies the fundamentals he has 

learned by performing endodontic procedures on clinical cases. 

Med. 132b. Basic Clinical Periodontics. (2) 

Third year. The lectures present the etiology, clinical symptoms, diagnosis, prognosis, 
and methods of treatment of the various forms of periodontal disease, other diseases 
of the oral cavity, and lesions of the lips, cheeks, and tongue. The recognition of 
periodontal disease in its incipient forms and the importance of early treatment are 
stressed. The lectures are well illustrated by color slides, moving pictures, and other 
visual aids. The Junior student is required to apply the fundamentals he has learned 
by performing periodontal procedures on a prescribed number of clinical cases. 

Med. 141b. Advanced Clinical Endodontics. (2) 

Fourth year. During his Senior year the student performs the endodontic procedures 

on the difficult clinical cases. 

Med. 142b. Advanced Clinical Periodontics. (2) 

Fourth year. The Senior student performs the periodontal procedures on clinical 

patients exhibiting the more advanced periodontal problems. 

MICROBIOLOGY 

Professor: Shay (Head of Department^). 

Mr. Vilk 

Microbiol. 121. Dental Microbiology and Immunology. (4) 

Second year. First semester. The course embraces lectures, laboratory, demonstra- 

M 28 



School of Dentistry 

tions, recitations, and group conferences, augmented by guided reading. Practical and 
theoretical consideration is given to pathogenic bacteria, viruses, yeasts and molds. 
Special attention is given to those organisms which cause lesions in and about the 
oral cavity, particularly primary focal infections about the teeth, tonsils, etc., which 
result in the establishment of secondary foci. Immunological and serological prin- 
ciples are studied, with special consideration being given to hypersensitivity resulting 
from the use of antibiotics, vaccines, antigens, and other therapeutic agents. 

Laboratory teaching includes the methods of staining and the cultural charac- 
teristics of microorganisms; their reaction to disinfectants, antiseptics, and germicides; 
methods of sterilization and asepsis; animal inoculation; preparation of sera, vaccines, 
and antitoxins; a study of antibiotics; and a demonstration of virus techniques. In all 
phases of the course emphasis is placed on dental applications. 

For Graduates 

Microbiol 200, 201. Chemotherapy. (1-2) 

Prerequisite Microbiology 121 or equivalent. One lecture a week. Offered in alter- 
nate years. A study of the chemistry, toxicity, pharmacology and therapeutic value of 
drugs employed in the treatment of disease. 

Microbiol. 202, 203. Reagents and Media. Q, I) 

One lecture a week. Offered in alternate years. A study of the methods of prep- 
aration and use of bacteriological reagents and media. 

Microbiol. 210. Special Problems in Microbiology. 

Credit determined by amount and quality of work performed. Laboratory course. 

Microbiol. 211. Public Health. (1-2) 

Prerequisite Microbiology 121 or equivalent. Lectures and discussions on the or- 
ganization and administration of state and municipal health departments and private 
health agencies. The course also includes a study of laboratory methods. 

Microbiol. 221. Research in Microbiology. 

Credit determined by amount and quality of work performed. 

OPERATIVE DENTISTRY 

Professor: Medina {Acting Head of Department}. 

Assistant Professors: H. M. Clement, C. Gaver, Louie and Edmond G. Vanden 

Bosche. 
Drs. Barlett, Beaven and Vachon. 

Oper. 121. Fundamentals of Operative Dentistry. (5) 

Second year. The student is trained in the technical procedures of cavity prepara- 
tion and the manipulation of the restorative materials employed in the treatment of 
diseases and injuries of the tooth structure. These basic principles are applied on 
composition teeth and extracted natural teeth. Instruction includes twenty-six lectures 
and forty-eight three-hour laboratory periods. 

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University of Maryland 

Oper. 131. Basic Clinical Operative Dentistry. (4) 

Third year. This course is a continuing development of the fundamentals taught in 
Operative 121. The objective is to present the additional information which is 
necessary for the management of practical cases. Instruction includes lectures, 
demonstrations and clinical practice in which the student treats patients under the 
individual guidance of staff members. 

Oper. 141. Advanced Clinical Operative Dentistry. (6) 

Fourth year. With the background provided by Operative 121 and 131, the student 
is able to comprehend and apply the procedures for treating the more complicated 
operative problems. The objectives of this course are to instruct the student in the 
different procedures by which a comprehensive operative service can be rendered 
and to acquaint him with as many unusual clinical cases as possible. Instruction 
includes lectures, demonstrations, and clinical practice. 

ORTHODONTICS 

Professor: Preis (Head of Department). 
Assistant Professors: Kress, Shehan and Swinehart. 
Drs. Cullen and Schaeffer. 

Orth. 131. Principles of Orthodontics. (2) 

Third year. The course consists of lectures supplemented by slides and motion pic- 
tures. The subject matter includes the history of orthodontics and the study of 
growth and development, evolution of human dental occlusion, forces of occlusion, 
etiology of malocclusion, aberrations of the maxilla and mandible which affect occlu- 
sion, and tissue changes incident to tooth movement. 

Ortho. 141. Clinical Orthodontics. (I) 

Fourth year. Students are assigned in small groups to the Clinic where patients are 
given a thorough dental examination. Under the direction of an instructor each case 
is diagnosed, methods of procedure are explained, and treatment planning is out- 
lined. In the more simple cases therapy is undertaken by the students under the 
supervision of an instructor. Students, therefore, have the opportunity of applying 
clinically the knowledge which they received during their Junior year. 

PATHOLOGY 

Professor: M. S. Aisenherg QHead of Department") 
Associate Professor: Weinberg. 
Assistant Professor: A. D. Aisenherg. 
Dr. Granruth. 

Path. 121. General Pathology. (4) 

Second year. Second semester. The general principles of disease processes and tissue 
reactions, both gross and microscopic, are taught with the objectives of training the 
student to recognize and be familiar with the abnormal and of creating a foundation 
for further study in the allied sciences. Emphasis is placed upon those diseases in 
the treatment of which medicodental relationships are to be encountered. 

** 30 



School of Dentistry 

Path. 131. Oral Pathology. (3) 

Third year. First semester. The course includes a study of the etiology and the 
gross and microscopic manifestations of diseases of the teeth and their investing 
structures: pathologic dentition, dental anomalies, periodontal diseases, calcific de- 
posits, dental caries, pulpal diseases, dentoalveolar abscesses, oral manifestations of 
systemic diseases, cysts of the jaws, and benign and malignant lesions in and about 
the oral cavity. 

Path. 141. Seminar. 

Fourth year. This constitutes a part of the cancer teaching program sponsored by a 
grant from the United States Public Health Service. It is conducted by visiting lec- 
turers who are specialists in their respective fields. 

For Graduates 

Path. 211. Advanced Oral Pathology. (8) 

Two lectures and two laboratory periods throughout the year. This course is pre- 
sented with the objective of correlating a knowledge of histopathology with the 
various aspects of clinical practice. Studies of surgical and biopsy specimens are 
stressed. 

Path. 212. Research. 

Time and credit by arrangement. Research in areas of particular interest to the 

student. 

PEDODONTICS 

Associate Professor: Sanders. 
Drs. Ehrlich and Bartlett. 

Ped. 121. Technics of Perodontics. (I) 

Second year. Second semester. This laboratory course in dentistry for children 
consists of sixteen laboratory periods. Demonstrations and visual aids are utilized to 
augment the teaching procedure. The work is performed on model teeth in primary 
dentoforms and consists of exercises in cavity preparation in primary teeth for the 
proper reception of different restorative materials, in the technic of restoring a frac- 
tured young permanent anterior tooth, and in the construction of a basic type of 
space maintainer. 

Ped. 131. Clinical Pedodontics. (I) 

Third year. The student is introduced to clinical dentistry for children. He utilizes 
the technical procedures learned in the laboratory. Didactic instruction includes 
sixteen lectures offered during the first semester. Emphasis is given to the manage- 
ment of the child patient with necessary modifications for behavior problems. The 
indications and contraindications for pulpal therapy are evaluated for the purpose 
of rational tooth conservation. Oral hygiene, roentgenology, growth and develop 
ment, and caries susceptibility tests are taught. Training in preventive orthodontics 
is given for true denture guidance and to allow the student to institute interceptive 
or early remedial measures in incipient deformities. 

31 ► 



University of Maryland 

The Department endeavors to develop in the student a comprehensive interest 
in guiding the child patient through the period of the mixed dentition. A separate 
clinic, equipped with child-size chairs and supervised by the pedodontics staff, pro- 
vides adequate opportunity for clinical applications of the methods taught in labora- 
tory and lectures. 

Ped. 141. Clinical Pedodontics. (I) 

Fourth year. The student continues his clinical training throughout the year and is 

assigned the more difficult cases. 

PHARMACOLOGY 

Professor: Dobbs (Head of Department). 
Drs. Ross and Brown. 

Pharmacol. 131. General Pharmacology and Therapeutics. (4) 
Third year. The course is designed to provide a general survey of pharmacology, 
affording the students the necessary knowledge for the practice of rational therapeutics. 
The course is taught by lectures, laboratory and demonstrations. The first semester con- 
sists of sixteen hours of didactic work including instruction in pharmaceutical chemis- 
try, pharmacy, prescription writing, and the pharmacodynamics of the local-acting 
drugs. The second semester consists of thirty-two hours of didactics and forty-eight 
hours of laboratory instruction. The laboratory experiments are performed by stu- 
dents on animals and are designed to demonstrate the direct effects of drugs on vital 
tissues. The subject material consists of the pharmacodynamics of the systemic- 
acting drugs and the anti-infective agents. In the therapeutics phase the students 
are instructed in the use of drugs for the prevention, treatment, and correction of 
general and oral diseases. 

Pharmacol. 141. Oral Therapeutics, (i) 

Fourth year. First semester. This course consists of sixteen hours of lectures and 
demonstrations. It is designed to acquaint the students with the practical applica- 
tions of pharmacology in the treatment of dental and oral diseases. Particular em- 
phasis is given to the newer drugs and the more recent advances in therapeutics. 
Patients from the dental clinics and the hospital are used for demonstrations whenever 
possible. A correlation of theory with clinical practice is obtained by chairside in- 
struction on patients in the dental clinic. 

Pharmacol. 142. Nutritional Therapeutics. (I) 

Fourth year. Second semester. This course consists of sixteen hours of lectures and 
demonstrations devoted to the principles and practices of nutritional therapeutics. 
The presentation includes a study of the dietary requirements of essential food sub- 
stances in health and disease. The vitamin and mineral deficiency states with their 
pathology and symptomatology are presented with suggestions for dietary and drug 
therapy. Metabolic diseases are discussed, and their effects on the nutritional states 
are considered. Students are taught to plan diets for patients with various nutritional 
problems, such as those resulting from loss of teeth, the use of new appliances, dental 
caries, stomatitis, cellulitis, osteomyelitis, and bone fractures. A project study is 
made by each student which includes analyses of his basal metabolic requirement, his 
total energy requirement, and his dietary intake in relation to his daily needs. 

<* 32 



School of Dentistry 

PHYSIOLOGY 

Professor: Oster (Head of Department'). 
Assistant Professors: Shipley and Pollack. 

Physiol. 121. Principles of Physiology. (6) 

Second year. A fundamental objective of this course is to achieve an integration of 

basic scientific phenomena of function as they relate to the organism as a whole. 

Lectures deal with the principal fields of physiology, including heart and circula- 
tion, peripheral and central nervous functions, respiration, digestion, muscular ac- 
thitv, hepatic and renal functions, water and electrolyte balance, special senses, gen- 
eral and cellular metabolism, endocrines and reproduction. In the laboratory work 
(first semester) the classic experiments on frog and turtle muscle and heart function 
are followed by more advanced work on rabbits, cats, dogs and the students them- 
selves. A special series of lectures is devoted to the application of basic physiologic 
principles to human clinical problems. 

For Graduates 

Physiol. 211. Principles of Mammalian Physiology. (6) 

Prerequisite permission from the department. Same as course 121 but with collateral 

reading and additional instruction. 

Physiol. 212. Advanced Physiology. 

Hours and credit by arrangement. Lectures and seminars during the second semes- 
ter. 

Physiol. 213. Research. 

Hours and credits by arrangement. 

PRACTICE ADMINISTRATION 

Professor: Biddix. 

Dr. Lovett and Mr. O'Donnell. 

Pract. Adm. 141. Principles of Administration. (I) 

Fourth year. First semester. The objective of this course is to prepare students to 
assume the social, economic and professional responsibilities of dental practice. The 
lectures embrace the selection of the office location^and office equipment, the basis 
ol determining fees, the methods of collecting accounts, the use of auxiliary personnel, 
and the choice of various types of insurance and investments. A comprehensive 
bookkeeping system for a dental office is explained. 

Pract. Adm. 142. Ethics. (I) 

Fourth year. Second semester. The course includes lectures on general ethics and 
its basic teachings, and an interpretation of the philosophical principles adopted by 
the American Dental Association and embodied in its "Principles of Ethics." 

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University of Maryland 

Pract. Adm. 143. jurisprudence. (I) 

Fourth year. Second semester. The objective of the course is to acquaint the dental 
student with the fundamentals of law as they relate to the dentist and to his patients. 
The sources of law, the types of courts and court procedures are explained; the 
student is acquainted with the special statutory provisions pertaining to the regula- 
tion of the practice of dentistry, as well as the dentist's responsibilities under the 
criminal law. The respective rights and liabilities of both the dentist and his patients 
are considered in lectures dealing with contracts and torts; practical illustrations of 
these rights and liabilities are reviewed in the light of actual reported cases in the 
courts. 

ROENTGENOLOGY 

Professor: Biddix. 

Drs. R. DeMartin and Isbell. 

Roentgenol. 131. Principles of Dental Roentgenology. (2) 

Third year. The lectures include a study of the physical principles involved in the 
production of x-rays and a discussion of their properties and effects, the hazards of 
roentgenography to both operator and patient, the technics of taking roentgenograms, 
and the processing of the films. The conference periods deal with the roentgeno- 
graphic study of the normal anatomic structures in health and the variations noted 
under various pathologic conditions. 

Roentgenol. 132. Introduction to Clinical Dental Roentgenology. 
Third year. Second semester. The division of the class into small groups permits 
individual supervision in the clinical application of the material presented in Roent- 
genol. 131. Under guidance the student learns to correctly place, expose and process 
the film and mount a full series of dental roentgenograms. 

Roentgenol. 141. Clinical Dental Roentgenology. (I) 

Fourth year. Under a system of rotating assignments students are placed in constant 
association with the routine practical use of the roentgen ray. They are required to 
master the fundamental scientific principles and to acquire technical skill in taking, 
processing, and interpreting all types of intraoral and extraoral films. 

SURGERY 

Professors: Dorsey QHead of Department), Helrich, Robinson and Y eager. 
Associate Professor: Cappuccio. 
Assistant Professors: Siwinski and Inman. 
Drs. Hinds, Hyson, and Kaufman. 

Surg. 131. Anesthesiology. (2) 

Third year. Local anesthesia is taught in both principle and practice. In lectures 
and clinics all types of intraoral, extraoral, conduction and infiltration injections; 
the anatomical relation of muscles and nerves; the theory of action of anesthetic 
agents and their toxic manifestations are taught. Demonstrations are given in con- 

< 34 









School of Dentistry 

duction and infiltration technics; students give injections under supervision of an 
instructor. General anesthesia is taught in lectures and clinic demonstrations. The 
action or' the anesthetic agents, methods of administration, indications and contra- 
indications, and the treatment of toxic manifestations are included. Demonstrations 
are given in the preparation of the patient, the administration of all general anes- 
thetics (inhalant, rectal, spinal, and intravenous), and the technics for oral opera- 
tions. Clinics are held in the Department of Oral Surgery in the Dental School and 
in the Hospital. 

Surg. 132. Oral Surgery. (3) 

Third year. The course consists of lectures on the principles of surgery, the classifica- 
tion of teeth for extraction, and the pre- and postoperative treatment of ambulatory 
patients. The student is assigned to the Department of Oral Surgery on a rotating 
schedule and is required to produce local anesthesia and extract teeth under the 
supervision of an instructor. 

Surg. 141. Oral Surgery. (3) 

Fourth year. This course consists of lectures, clinical assignments, and practical 
demonstrations on the etiology, pathology, diagnosis and treatment of all classes of 
tumors, infections, deformities, anomalies, impacted teeth, fractures and surgical 
problems associated with the practice of dentistry. Hospital clinics, demonstrations 
and ward rounds are given to familiarize the student with abnormal conditions inci- 
dent to the field of his future operations and to train him thoroughly in the diagnosis 
of benign and malignant tumors. Weekly seminars are held in the Hospital. Each 
student prepares and presents an oral surgery case report according to the require- 
ments of the American Board of Oral Surgery. 

For Graduates 

Surg. 201. Clinical Anesthesiology. (6) 
Forty hours a week for thirteen weeks. 

Surg. 220. General Dental Oral Surgery, (i) 

Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week for one semester. 

Surg. 221. Advanced Oral Surgery. (4) 

Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week for one semester. 

Surg. 222. Research. 

lime and credit bv arrangement. 



VISUAL AIDS IN TEACHING 

Mr. Taylor and Staff. 

The Department of Visual Aids employs the latest photographic technics 
and equipment for the production of both monochromatic and full-color still 
and motion pictures. By cooperation with other departments new material is 
developed for lectures, clinics, publications and exhibits. 

35 ► 






University of Maryland 

Through photography the School retains for teaching purposes interesting 
cases that appear in the clinics, preserves evidence of unusual pathological 
cases, and records anatomical anomalies, facial disharmonies and malocclusions 
of the teeth. In addition the student, through his contact with photographic 
uses, becomes acquainted with the value of photography in clinical practice. 
Students are advised as to the use of visual aids in the preparation of lectures 
and theses, the arrangement and co-ordination of materials, and the organiza- 
tion and maintenance of records and histories. 

Various art media and the use of modem plastics supplement photography. 
By the combination and correlation of these methods all departments are pro- 
vided with an unlimited supply of valuable and often irreplaceable visual 
aids. 

SPECIAL COURSES 

Summer Courses 

As the need arises, summer courses may be offered in certain subjects in- 
cluded in the regular curriculum. A charge of $10.00 for each semester hour 
credit is made for these courses. 

Postgraduate Courses 

Postgraduate courses may be offered to qualified dental graduates. These 
courses are designed to provide oppportunities for study in special fields on a 
refresher level, and are arranged so that particular emphasis is placed on clinical 
practices. 

ANATOMY OF THE HEAD AND NECK 

This course is designed to review certain principles of Anatomy and to 
furnish the student opportunities to relate these principles to clinical practice. 
Instruction is presented in the form of illustrated lectures, seminars, and 
laboratory dissection. One semester, full time. Tuition, $200.00. Maximum 
expense for books, supplies, and equipment, $45.00. 

ORAL PATHOLOGY 

The course in Oral Pathology is presented with the objective of correlating 
a knowledge of histopathology with the various aspects of clinical practice. 
The physiology of the periodontal attachment and the pathology of the dental 
pulp, the periodontium, the hard tissues of the teeth, odontogenic cysts and 
tumors, and cancer in and about the oral cavity are stressed. Studies of sur- 
gical and biopsy specimens are also emphasized. Opportunity for supervised 
research in areas of particular interest to the student will be available. One 
year, full time. Tuition, $550.00. Maximum expense for books, supplies, and 
equipment, $75.00, which includes microscope fee of $25.00. 

<* 36 



School of Dentistry 



ORAL SURGERY 



The course in Oral Surgery is organized to train the dentist in advanced 
surgical procedures of the oral cavity and the associated parts. Although pri- 
marily designed for the general practitioner, the course can be used as credit 
toward specialization in Oral Surgery. One year, full time. Tuition, $550.00. 
Maximum expense for books, supplies, and equipment, $75.00. 



PERIODONTA 

The course in Periodontia consists of a review of the etiology of the various 
types of periodontal disease. Instruction is presented by means of lectures, 
seminars and clinical demonstration. One semester, full time. Tuition, $200.00. 
Maximum expense for books, supplies, and equipment, $75.00. 

PROSTHESIS 

Instruction will be given in the fundamental principles and factors in- 
volved in complete denture prosthesis, the general problems in diagnosis and 
treatment planning, and the procedures of constructing partial and complete 
dentures. Ample opportunity will be provided for the application of the basic 
principles and procedures of clinical practice. One semester, full time. Tuition, 
$200.00. Maximum expense for books, supplies, and equipment, $300.00. 

VISUAL AIDS 

The basic principles and practices of Visual Aids are presented by lecture, 
demonstration and laboratory technics. Practical photography and moulage are 
featured, with instruction in department organization and exhibition arrange- 
ment. Four weeks, full time. Tuition, $150.00. 

The Gorgas Odontological Society 

The Gorgas Odontological Society was organized in 1916 as an honorary 
student dental society with scholarship as a basis for admission. The Society 
was named after Dr. Ferdinand J. S. Gorgas, a pioneer in dental education, a 
teacher of many years' experience, and during his life a great contributor to 
dental literature. It was with the idea of perpetuating his name that the 
Society adopted it. 

To be eligible for membership a student must be in the first 30 per cent of 
his class. The selection of this 30 per cent shall be based on the weighted 
percentage average system as outlined in the school regulations. The meetings, 
held once each month, are addressed by prominent dntal and mdical men, an 
effort being made to obtain speakers not connected with the University. The 
members have an opportunity, even while students, to hear men associated with 
other educational institutions. 

37 ► 



University of Maryland 



Omicron Kafpa Upsilon 



Phi Chapter of Omicron Kappa Upsilon honorary dental society was char- 
tered at the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, University of 
Maryland during the session of 1928-29. Membership in the society is 
awarded to a number not exceeding 12 per cent of the graduating class. This 
honor is conferred upon students who through their professional course of 
study creditably fulfill all obligations as students, and whose conduct, earnest- 
ness, evidence of good character and high scholarship recommend them to 
election. 

The following graduates of the 1957 Class were elected to membership: 

Robert Lekman Bartlett Ernest Charles Merkel, Jr. 

Robert Edward DeMartin Rafael Angel Pagan-Colon 

Roy Frank Gherardi Roy Christopher Page 

George William Greco William Henry Ruppert, Jr. 

Walter Burnell Hall Charles Benjamin Rushford, Jr. 

Kenneth Joseph Langfield James Richard Sullivan 

Alumni Association 

The first annual meeting of the Society of the Alumni of the Baltimore 
College of Dental Surgery was held in Baltimore, March 1, 1849. This organi- 
zation has continued in existence to the present, its name having been changed 
to The National Alumni Association of the Baltimore College of Dental Sur- 
gery, Dental School, University of Maryland. 

The officers of the Alumni Association for 1957-1958 are as follows: 

President P resident-Elect 

Daniel E. Shehan Edwin G. Gail 

Medical Arts Building 3700 N. Charles St. 

Baltimore 1, Maryland Baltimore 18, Maryland 

Vice-President Historian 

Joseph J. Martini Milton B. Asbell 

Passaic, N. J. 25 Haddon Avenue 

Camden, New Jersey 
secretary 

Joseph P. Cappuccio Treasurer 

1010 St. Paul Street Howard Van Natta 

Baltimore 2, Maryland Medical Arts Building 

Baltimore 1, Maryland 

Editor 

Kyrle W. Preis 

700 Cathedral Street 

Baltimore 1, Maryland 

-+ 38 



School of Dentistry 



University Alumni Council Representatives 



Harry Levin, 1958 

3429 Park Heights Avenue 

Baltimore 15, Maryland 



Daniel E. Shehan, 1958 
Baltimore, Maryland 



Eugene D. Lyon, 1960 

11 E. Chase Street 
Baltimore 2, Maryland 

Executive Council 

Joseph M. Tighe, Chairman, 1959 
Baltimore, Maryland 

Irving Abramson, 1959 Wilbur B. Mehring, 1960 

Baltimore, Maryland Silver Spring, Md. 

Max K. Baklor, 1958 Eugene L. Pessagno, Jr., 1958 

Baltimore, Maryland Baltimore, Maryland 



Frank Hurst, Ex-Officio, 1958 
Washington, D. C. 



John T. Stang, 1958 
Baltimore, Maryland 



Trustees Ex-Officio 

Daniel E. Shehan, President 

Edwin C. Gail, President-Elect 

Arthur I. Bell, Secretary-Treasurer 

Joseph M. Tighe, Chairman of Executive Council 

Myron S. Aisenberg, Dean 



Elected Trustees 



Augustine L. Cavallaro, 1958 

291 Whitney Avenue 

New Haven, Conn. 

Frank N. Carroll, 1959 

1015 Central Union Bldg. 

Wheeling, West Va. 

Edward C. Morin, 1960 

156 Broadway 

Pawtucket, R. I. 



Irvin B. Golboro, 1958 

Naylors Lane 

Pikesville 8, Maryland 

Lewis C. Toomey, Jr., 1959 

8641 Colesville Road 

Silver Spring, Md. 

L. W. BlMESTEFER, 1960 

1 Kinship Road 
Baltimore 22, Maryland 



39 ► 



University of Maryland 

SENIOR PRIZE AWARDS 

The following prizes were awarded to members of the Senior Class for the 
1956-57 Session: 

The Alexander H. Pater son Memorial Medal 

For Practical Set of Full Upper and Lower Dentures 

WILLIAM MILTON BARBUSH 

Honorable Mention Joseph Patrick Garvey 

The Isaac H. Davis Memorial Medal 

(Contributed by Dr. Leonard I. Davis) 

For Cohesive Gold Filling 

ALAN STOLER 

Honorable Mention Richard Howard Warren 

The Alumni Association Medal 

For Thesis 

JOHN GEORGE MUELLER 

Honorable Mention Roy Christopher Page 

The Harry E. Kelsey Award 

(Contributed by former associates of Dr. Kelsey: 

Drs. Anderson, Devlin, Hodges, Johnston and Preis) 

For Professional Demeanor 

WILLIAM HENRY RUPPERT, JR. 

The Harry E. Latcham Memorial Medal 

For Complete Oral Operative Restoration 

RAY EVAN GRIFFIN 

Honorable Mention Kenneth Joseph Langfield 

The Edgar J. Jacques Memorial Award 

For Meritorious Work in Practical Oral Surgery 

JIMMY RAY HAGER 

The Herbert Friedherg Memorial Award 

(Contributed by the New Jersey Alumni Chapter of the 

National Alumni Association) 

For Achievement hy a New Jersey Senior 

RICHARD HOWARD WARREN 

The James P. McCormick Award 

For Meritorious Work in the Treatment of Traumatic 

Injuries of the Face and Jaws 

JOHN FREDERICK BLACK 

< 40 



School of Dentistry 

Graduating Class 
1956-57 Session 

Norman Stanley Alpher, The George Washington University 

District of Columbia 

William Milton Barbush, West Virginia University West Virginia 

Robert Lehman Bartlett, B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1953 

Maryland 

Robert Vincent Bates, Denison University Maryland 

Eugene Arthur Beliveau, B.S., Boston College, 1953 Massachusetts 

Daniel Willis Benton, University of Utah Utah 

William Frederick Bishop, B.S., University of Maryland, 1953 ... .Maryland 

John Frederick Black, Fairleigh Dickinson College New Jersey 

Louis Blum, The Newark Colleges of Rutgers University Pennsylvania 

William George Buchanan, University of Maryland New Jersey 

Vito Dominic Buonomano, Jr., B.S., Providence College, 1953. . . .Rhode Island 

James Ambrose Butler, Jr., Niagara LIniversity New York 

Richard Ernest Cabana, Seton Hall University New Jersey 

Hubert Thomas Chandler, Morris Harvey College West Virginia 

Robert Lee Childs, B.A., Duquesne University, 1952 Pennsylvania 

Bernie Odell Coberly, B.S., University of Maryland Maryland 

Neil Cohen, University of Miami Florida 

William Eugene Colliver, B.S., University of Maryland, 1956 Maryland 

Joseph Andre Croteau, B.S., College of the Holy Cross, 1953. . . .Massachusetts 
Bertrand Saul Dann, B.S., University of Maryland, 1951; M.S., 1953 

Maryland 

Urban Bernard DeCosta, B.S., Providence College, 1953 Rhode Island 

Frederick Bertrand Delorme, University of Vermont and State Agricultural 

College Vermont 

John Joseph DeAlartin, University of Vermont and State Agricultural 

College Connecticut 

Robert Edward DeMartin, University of Vermont and State Agricultural 

College Connecticut 

John Henry Dempsey, A.B., West Virginia University, 1953... West Virginia 

Elliott Howard Dickler, B.S., University of Maryland, 1953 Maryland 

Seymour Bernard Fingerhood, B.A., New York University, 1952. ..New Jersey 

Karl Josef Foose, Marshall College West Virginia 

William Grady Franklin, B.S., University of Maryland, 1955 Maryland 

Paul Edward Freed, University of Maryland Maryland 

Joseph Patrick Garvey, B.S., College of the Holy Cross, 1953. . . .Rhode Island 

Roy Frank Gherardi, B.A., New York University, 1952 New York 

George William Greco, Mount St. Mary's College Maryland 

Ray Evan Griffin, B.A., University of Vermont and State Agricultural 

College, 1953 Vermont 

Jimmy Ray Hager, West Virginia University West Virginia 

Walter Burnell Hall, A.B., Cornell University, 1953 Massachusetts 

41 ► 



University of Maryland 

Raymond Donald Haslam, Washington Missionary College Pennsylvania 

Paul Emmet Higgins, University of Maryland Maryland 

Thomas Kent Ingram, Virginia Military Institute Virginia 

Gerald Marshall Isbell, University of Maryland Maryland 

William McDonald Johnson, Berea College Florida 

Livia Kalnins, The Johns Hopkins University, McCoy College Latvia 

William Ignatius Keene, Mt. Saint Mary's College New Jersey 

John Poist Keffer, Jr., Villanova College New Jersey 

James Van Lieu Kiser, Davis and Elkins College West Virginia 

Fred Herman Andrew Koeniger, The University of Rochester New York 

Kenneth Joseph Langfield, University of Massachusetts Massachusetts 

George Albert Lippard, Jr., B.S., Davidson College, 1953 South Carolina 

Donald Bruce Lurie, Western Maryland College Maryland 

John Joseph Martielli, B.S., Davis and Elkins College, 1953 Florida 

Dennis Laurent Maud, B.A., Norwich University, 1953 New York 

Jerry Wayne Medlock, B.S., Presbyterian College, 1953 Texas 

Ernest Charles Merkel, Jr., B.S., University of Maryland, 1951 ... .Maryland 

Eugene Joseph Messer, A.B., St. Michael's College, 1953 Massachusetts 

Joe Harvey Miller, Jr., University of Maryland Maryland 

John Charles Miller, Jr., University of Maryland District of Columbia 

John George Mueller, B.A., Duke University, 1953 Oklahoma 

Raymond Elliot Mullaney, B.S., University of Maryland, 1952. . .Massachusetts 

Nassif Joseph Nassif, West Virginia University West Virginia 

Minor Paul Nestor, B.S., University of Maryland, 1953 Maryland 

Thomas Francis Owens, The Pennsylvania State College Pennsylvania 

Rafael Angel Pagan-Colon, B.S., University of Puerto Rico, 1950. .Puerto Rico 

Roy Christopher Page, A.B., Berea College, 1953 South Carolina 

Orie Nicholas Passarelli, B.S., Saint Peter's College, 1953 New Jersey 

William Russell Patteson, Marshall College West Virginia 

Peter Pecoraro, Jr., B.S., Providence College, 1953 Rhode Island 

John Vincent Puelo, B.A., Providence College, 1953 Rhode Island 

Alfred Joseph Rapuano, The Newark Colleges of Rutgers University 

New Jersey 

Clyde Eugene Reed, B.S., West Virginia University, 1951 West Virginia 

Angelo Michael Repole, University of Maryland New Jersey 

Vernon Delaney Rodeffer, Catawba College Pennsylvania 

William Henry Ruppert, Jr., University of Maryland Maryland 

Charles Benjamin Rushford, Jr., A.B., West Virginia University, 1953 

West Virginia 

Herbert Henry Rust, Queens College New York 

Francis John Salvato, A.B., Gettysburg College, 1953 New Jersey 

Alvin Robert Sayers, Midwestern University Vermont 

Abraham Schachter, B.A., The University of Connecticut, 1953 . .Connecticut 

Albert Seymore Schaffer, University of Maryland Maryland 

Paul Kenneth Schick, Tufts College Connecticut 

Harry Edwin Semler, Jr., B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1953. .Maryland 

^ 42 






School of Dentistry 

Joseph Israel Shevenell, B.S., St. Michael's College, 1947 Maine 

Carl S. Singer, B.S., University of Maryland, 1953 Maryland 

Robert John Stag, University of Maryland Maryland 

Thomas Dodds Stokes, Jr., B.A., The University of North Carolina, 

1953 North Carolina 

Alan Stoler, University of Miami Florida 

John Malcomb Stribling, University of Florida Florida 

James Richard Sullivan, Montgomery Junior College Maryland 

Carl Anthony Tomosivitch, B.S., St. John's University, 1953 New York 

Joel Jacob Ulanet, Lafavette College New Jersey 

John David Yachon, A.B., West Virginia University, 1952; M.S., 1953 

West Virginia 

John Wilson Vargo, Morris Harvey College West Virginia 

Hans Kvamme Varmer, B.A., Washington Missionary College, 1951. .Maryland 

Frank Joseph Verdecchia, B.S., University of Maryland, 1955 Maryland 

Richard Howard Warren, New York University New Jersey 

George William Waxter, University of Maryland Maryland 

Daniel Fowler Whiteside, University of Florida Florida 

Frederick Brown Williams, The Citadel South Carolina 



Honors 

Summa Cum Laude 

Roy Christopher Page 

Magna Cum Laude 

James Richard Sullivan Robert Lehman Bartlett 

Robert Edward DeMartin George William Greco 

Ernest Charles Merkel, Jr. 

Cum Laude 

Kenneth Joseph Langfield Roy Frank Gherardi 

Charles Benjamin Rushford, Jr. Rafael Angel Pagan-Colon 

Walter Burnell Hall William Henry Ruppert, Jr. 

Degree Conferred August 1, 1956 

Robert Vincent Bates, Denison University Maryland 

Bernie Odell Coberly, B.S., University of Maryland Maryland 

Vernon Delaney Rodeffer, Catawba College Pennsylvania 

Daniel Fowler Whiteside, University of Florida Florida 

43 ► 



University of Maryland 

Senior Class 

Ralph Richard Asadourian, B.A., University of New Hampshire, 

1954 New Hampshire 

Ronald James Bauerle, B.A., Providence College, 1954 Connecticut 

Carl Mitchell Baumann, University of Florida Florida 

Philip Stanley Benzil, B.S., University of Miami, 1954 Florida 

Thomas Henry Birney, B.A., University of Southern California, 1954 

California 

Stanley Earle Block, University of Maryland Maryland 

Joseph Paul Bodo, Jr., B.S., University of Tampa, 1954 Florida 

Stanley Saul Brager, B.S., University of Maryland, 1954 Maryland 

Harry Edward Brandau, Jr., University of Maryland Maryland 

Robert Sherman Brown, University of Pennsylvania New Jersey 

John Paul Burton, West Virginia University West Virginia 

Charles Wallis Buttner, University of Miami Florida 

Enrique Rafael Capo, Haverf ord College Puerto Rico 

Robert Ernest Chait, University of Miami Florida 

Virgil Lewis Chambers, Marshall College West Virginia 

George Elmore Collins, B.S., University of Maryland, 1956 Maryland 

Martin Richard Crytzer, B.S., University of Maryland, 1954 Pennsylvania 

Stanley Carl DelTufo, B.A., Rutgers University, 1954 New Jersey 

William Clinton Denison, West Virginia University West Virginia 

F. Lee Eggnatz, University of Florida Florida 

Melvin Feiler, Upsala College New Jersey 

Dayton Carroll Ford, Marshall College West Virginia 

Orton Dittmar Frisbie, University of Florida Florida 

Jose Antonio Fuentes, University of Puerto Rico Puerto Rico 

John William Gannon, Jr., A.B., West Virginia University, 1954. .West Virginia 

Richard Chris Georgiades, Virginia Military Institute Florida 

Robert Goren, B.S., University of Maryland, 1952 Maryland 

Barbara Lorraine Greco, A.B., The Newark Colleges of Rutgers 

University, 1954 New Jersey 

Anton Grobani, B.S., University of Maryland, 1954 Maryland 

Fernando Haddock, B.S., University of Puerto Rico, 1954 Puerto Rico 

Robert William Haroth, University of Maryland Maryland 

Barry Ronald Harris, University of Maryland Maryland 

Richard McFern Hemphill, A.B., West Virginia University, 1954. .West Virginia 
Gerald Franklin Hoffman, B.A., University of Connecticut, 1954. .Connecticut 

Paul Harvey Hyland, University of Delaware Delaware 

William Louis Hyman, University of Miami Florida 

Allen Burton Itkin, University of Connecticut Connecticut 

Lawrence Paul Jacobs, A.B., Temple University, 1954 Delaware 

Alfred Howard Jansen, Jr., University of Maryland Maryland 

Robert Mathis Johnson, B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1954. .Maryland 
Paul Franklin Kiefman, B.S., The American University, 1951 Virginia 



^ 44 









School of Dentistry 

Robert Harmon McLloyd Killpack, B.A., University of Utah, 1954 Utah 

Anthony Joseph Klein, Jr., B.S., University of Cincinnati, 1954. . . .New York 

David Rodman Lecrone, University of Delaware Delaware 

Walter Prudden Leonard, Emory University Florida 

John Frank Lessig, B.S., University of Maryland, 1956 Maryland 

Herbert Gary Levin, University of Maryland Maryland 

Donald Palmer Lewis, Norwich University Massachusetts 

Robert Bernard Lewis, B.S., College of the Holy Cross, 1954. . . .Rhode Island 

Benedict Salvatore LiPira, B.S., University of Maryland, 1954 Maryland 

Garrett Isaac Long, Jr., A.B., West Virginia University, 1954 Maryland 

Luis Felipe Lucca, B.S., University of Puerto Rico, 1948 Puerto Rico 

Albert Silveira Luiz, A.B., Boston University, 1952 Massachusetts 

Lawford Earle Magruder, Jr., University of Maryland Maryland 

Clyde Danforth Marlow, Emory University Florida 

Carlos Rafael Matos, University of Puerto Rico Puerto Rico 

Edward Robert McLaughlin, B.S., University of Massachusetts, 1954 

Massachusetts 

David Frederick Mehlisch, Graceland College Maryland 

Raymond Dennis Menton, Jr., B.S., Loyola College, 1954 Maryland 

Anthony Nicholas Micelotti, B.S., Boston College, 1952 Massachusetts 

Paul Masashi Morita, University of Maryland New Jersey 

Richard Warren Moss, Emory University Florida 

James Edward Nadeau, American International College Massachusetts 

William Harold Neilund, B.S., University of Maryland, 1951 Maryland 

Philip Patrick Nolan, B.S., Loyola College, 1953 Maryland 

Ralph Fields Norwood, Jr., Bethany College West Virginia 

Guy Sullivan O'Brien, Jr., B.S., Furman University, 1954 South Carolina 

Charles Irving Osman, B.S., University of Florida, 1954 Florida 

Warren Andrew Parker, Mount Saint Mary's College New Jersey 

Bienvenido Perez, Jr., University of Puerto Rico, 1954 New York 

George Louis Plassnig, University of Maryland Maryland 

Joseph Marion Powell, Furman University South Carolina 

Ralph Weyman Price, North Georgia College Virginia 

Alan Shia Resnek, Tufts College Massachusetts 

Henry Edward Richter, Jr., B.S., University of Maryland, 1954 Virginia 

Peter Arthur Rubelman, Emory University Florida 

John Sidney Rushton, University of Maryland Virginia 

Robert Nicholas Santangelo, Purdue University New Jersey 

Lawrence Donald Sarubin, B.S., University of Maryland, 1949 Maryland 

James Augustus Schaefer, B.S., St. Michael's College, 1954 New York 

Leonard Stanley Schneider, The Johns Hopkins University Maryland 

Howard Schwartz, B.A., Piutgers University, 1954 New Jersey 

Irwin Bernard Schwartz, The Newark Colleges of Rutgers University 

New Jersey 

David Howard Shamer, B.S., University of Maryland, 1951 Maryland 

Charles Irvine Shelton, West Virginia University West Virginia 

45 ► 



University of Maryland 

Cyril Stanton Sokale, B.A., The University of Connecticut, 1954. .Connecticut 

Edward William Spinelli, Jr., A.B., Tufts College, 1954 Massachusetts 

Howard Stanton Spurrier, University of Utah Utah 

John Francis Spychalski, B.S., St. Bernardine of Siena College, 1952. . .New York 

Ivan Lee Starr, A.B., Syracuse University, 1954 New Jersey 

Ronald Martin Starr, University of Maryland Maryland 

Elizabeth Lee Stewart, The Johns Hopkins University Maryland 

Marvin Howard Tawes, Jr., B.S., University of Maryland, 1956 Maryland 

Linn Shecut Tompkins, Jr., University of South Carolina South Carolina 

Frank Trotto, Jr., A.B., West Virginia University, 1953 West Virginia 

Donald Herbert Wadsworth, Emory University Florida 

James Ray Wampler, Richmond College, University of Richmond Virginia 

William James Washuta, University of Miami Florida 

David Allen Watson, B.S., University of Maryland, 1956 Maryland 

Louis Weiss, University of Maryland Maryland 

William Alvin Wolf, A.B., Upsala College, 1951 Connecticut 

Rodger August Zelles, B.S., Rutgers University, 1954 New Jersey 

Junior Class 

Kenneth David Bass, B.A., University of Connecticut, 1953; 

M.S., 1955 Connecticut 

Robert Gene Beckelheimer, Concord College West Virginia 

Frederick Blumenthal, University of Miami Florida 

Leonard Francis Borges, B.S., Tufts College, 1951 Massachusetts 

Martin David Breckstein, University of Florida Florida 

Lawrence Austin Brehne, B.A., Rutgers University, 1951 New Jersey 

Robert Francis Bristol, B.A., Providence College, 1955 Rhode Island 

John C. L. Brown, Jr., B.S., The Pennsylvania State University, 1952 

Pennsylvania 

Bayard Allen Buchen, Emory University Florida 

Robert Rolland Buckner, Washington Missionary College Georgia 

Barbara Dorothea Bucko, Syracuse University Connecticut 

Thomas Cali, B.S., University of Maryland, 1955 New Jersey 

John Joseph Cartisano, Indiana University New York 

Gary Herbert Cohen, University of Maryland Maryland 

Robert Ted Conner, West Virginia University West Virginia 

Juan Anibal Cuevas- Jimenez, B.S., University of Puerto Rico, 1953 

Puerto Rico 

Adolph Albert Cura, B.A., Boston College, 1955 Massachusetts 

Peter Bernard DalPozzol, Colby College Connecticut 

Allan Lee Danoff , University of Maryland Maryland 

Eugene Frederick deLonge, Newberry College South Carolina 

Joseph Budding Dietz, Jr., Lehigh University Delaware 

Frank Anthony Dolle, B.S., University of Maryland, 1948; M.S., 

1950; Ph.D., 1954 Maryland 

** 46 



School of Dentistry 

William Frank Dombrowski, B.S., United States Naval Academy, 1950 

Maryland 
James Francis Dooley, B.S., United States Merchant Marine Academy, 

1950; A.B., Rutgers University, 1951 New Jersey 

William Edward Dowden, B.S., Niagara University, 1955 New York 

Conrad Castenzio Ferlita, University of Miami Florida 

Raymond Alan Flanders, Colgate University New York 

John Morrison Foley, B.S., Loyola College, 1955 Maryland 

James Arthur Fowler, Jr., University of Maryland Maryland 

Robert Donald Fraser, B.S., Niagara University, 1955 New York 

Richard Lawrence Fraze, Tufts College Florida 

Larry Joe Frick, The Clemson Agricultural College South Carolina 

Thornwell Jacobs Frick, B.S., Davidson College, 1955 South Carolina 

Ivan Orlo Gardner, B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1952 Maryland 

Billy Wade Gaskill, West Virginia University Arkansas 

Gorm Pultz Hansen, University of Maryland Maryland 

Frederick Lewis Hodous, University of Maryland Maryland 

Francis Kurt Hugelmeyer, B.S., College of the Holy Cross, 1955. . . .New York 

Eugene Farley Humphreys, Brigham Young University Idaho 

James Paul Jabbour, B.S., Tufts College, 1950; Ed.M., 1951 Massachusetts 

Calvin Charles Kay, University of Miami Florida 

Edward Gerard Keen, St. Anselm's College Connecticut 

Paul Lewis Keener, University of Maryland Maryland 

Joseph Krall, B.S., University of Maryland, 1948 Maryland 

Jacob Ian Krampf , University of Maryland Maryland 

Frank Walter Krause, B.A., University of Virginia, 1955 New Jersey 

Domenic Edward LaPorta, University of Maryland Connecticut 

Richard John Lauttman, B.S., Loyola College, 1953 Maryland 

Robert Louis Lee, University of Maryland Maryland 

Wallace George Lee, University of Maryland Michigan 

Lester Leonard Levin, University of Maryland Maryland 

Leslie Herminio Lopez- Velez, B.S., University of Puerto Rico, 1955 

Puerto Rico 

Joseph Paul Lynch, B.S., Seton Hall University, 1953 New Jersey 

Carlos A. Machuca-Padin, B.S., University of Puerto Rico, 1954. . . .Puerto Rico 

Arnold Irwin Malhmood, University of Maryland Maryland 

Jose Manuel Martinez, B.S., University of Puerto Rico, 1955 Puerto Rico 

John Kenneth McDonald, Louisiana State University and Agricultural 

and Mechanical College Mississippi 

Thomas James Meakem, Davis and Elkins College New Jersey 

Thomas Eugene Miller, B.S., St. John's University, 1955 New Jersey 

Bernard Lee Morgan, B.A., West Virginia University, 1955.... West Virginia 

Fabian Morgan, B.S., Wake Forest College, 1954 North Carolina 

John Worthington Myers, Hagerstown Junior College Maryland 

Elizabeth Haydee Noa, B.A., Nazareth College, 1954 Puerto Rico 

William Barnard O'Connor, West Virginia University West Virginia 

47 ► 



University of Maryland 

William Robert Owens, B.S., Davidson College, 1954 North Carolina 

Jeffry Chandler Pennington, The Citadel South Carolina 

Charles Kenneth Peters, Jr., B.S., Loyola College, 1954 Maryland 

Gregory Michael Petrakis, B.S., Trinity College, 1955 Connecticut 

George Jackson Phillips, Jr., B.A., Amherst College, 1955 Maryland 

Barry Pickus, B.A., Western Maryland College, 1955 Maryland 

Donald Alan Pirie, B.S., University of Maryland, 1955 Maryland 

Anthony Michael Policastro, B.A., Seton Hall University, 1955. . . .New Jersey 

Joseph Eul Polino, B.A., Providence College, 1955 Connecticut 

Alben R. Pollack, B.A., Alfred University, 1955 New York 

Joel Pollack, B.S., The City College of New York, 1955 New York 

Albert Edward Postal, University of Maryland District of Columbia 

William Lewis Pralley, B.A., West Virginia University, 1955. ..West Virginia 

John Viering Raese, West Virginia University West Virginia 

William Paul Raimond, University of Maryland Maryland 

Harold Reuben Ribakow, University of Maryland Maryland 

Chester James Richmond, Jr., Tufts College Connecticut 

Matthew Angelo Rocco, B.A., Seton Hall University, 1955 New Jersey 

Lawrence David Rogers, University of Maryland Maryland 

Everett Newton Roush, III, Marshall College West Virginia 

Louis Joseph Ruland, Jr., B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1955 

Maryland 

Raymond Richard Sahley, Marshall College West Virginia 

Charles Salerno, Upsala College New Jersey 

Richard Charles Saville, B.A., University of Maryland, 1955 Maryland 

David Lee Schofield, University of Miami Florida 

Jerome Schwartz, B.S., University of Maryland, 1949 Maryland 

Robert Bernard Silberstein, University of Florida Florida 

Stanley Leonard Silver, B.S., University of Maryland, 1953 

District of Columbia 

Francis Vincent Simansky, B.S., Loyola College, 1955 Maryland 

Orlando Louis Skaff, B.A., West Virginia University, 1955 West Virginia 

Philip Smith, University of Vermont and State Agricultural College. .Vermont 

Anthony Sollazzo, Rutgers University New Jersey 

James Frederick Sproul, West Virginia University Ohio 

John Joseph Stecher, B.S., Seton Hall University, 1952 New Jersey 

Donald Dietrich Stegman, B.S., University of Maryland, 1952 Maryland 

Daniel Joseph Sullivan, B.A., Providence College, 1955 Rhode Island 

Charles Carroll Swoope, Jr., University of Florida New Jersey 

Arthur Morton Tilles, University of Maryland Maryland 

John Louis Varanelli, University of Connecticut Connecticut 

Francis Anthony Veltre, B.S., University of Maryland, 1952; 

M.S., 1954 Maryland 

Jorge Vendrell, Tulane University of Louisiana Puerto Rico 

Leonard Clifford Warner, Jr., Colby College Connecticut 

Edgar Clair White, Marshall College Kentucky 

^ 48 



School of Dentistry 

Thomas Adams Wilson, B.A., Amherst College, 1955 Maryland 

Herbert Sanford Yampolsky, B.S., University of Alabama, 1955. . . .New Jersey 

Sophomore Class 

Joel Martin Adler, Emory University Mississippi 

Earl Robert Alban, Jr., B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1954. . .Maryland 

John Jacob Atchinson, Marshall College West Virginia 

Edmund Donald Baron, Rutgers University New Jersey 

Hulon Edward Beasley, University of Florida Maryland 

John William Biehn, University of Maryland Maryland 

Raymond Cline Bodley, West Virginia University West Virginia 

William Francis Brady, Jr., B.S., Boston College, 1954; M.S., 

University of Massachusetts, 1956 Massachusetts 

Frank Lee Bragg, West Virginia University West Virginia 

James Peter Brown, B.A., American International College, 1956. .Massachusetts 

Rolla Ray Burk, Jr., A.B., West Virginia, 1951 West Virginia 

Gene Edward Camp,. West Virginia University West Virginia 

Robert Roy Chesney, Western Maryland College Maryland 

Robert A. Cialone, B.Sr, University of Maryland, 1955 New Jersey 

William John Cimikoski, A.B., University of Michigan, 1953 ... .Connecticut 

Milton Chipman Clegg, B.A., University of Utah, 1956 Utah 

Clyde Albert Coe, University of Maryland Maryland 

Blanca Collazo, B.S., University of Puerto Rico, 1956 Puerto Rico 

Frank Lateau Collins, West Virginia University West Virginia 

Myron Harris Coulton, University of Florida Florida 

Thomas Joseph Cronin, B.S., De Paul University, 1955 New Jersey 

William Walter Cwiek, B.S., University of Maryland, 1953 Maryland 

Charles Albert Darby, University of Maryland Maryland 

Charles Albert Dean, B.A., Providence College, 1956 Massachusetts 

John Jay Denson, Jr., B.S., University of Florida, 1956 Florida 

Michael Vincent Doran, Jr., B.S., University of Miami, 1956 Virginia 

Raymond Dzoba, Bowling Green State University New Jersey 

Morton Mayer Ehudin, University of Maryland Maryland 

Joseph Thomas Fay, B.A., Providence College, 1956 Rhode Island 

Humbert Michael Fiskio, A.B., Oberlin College, 1955; 

University of Connecticut, 1956 Connecticut 

Henry Paul Fox, St. Michael's College New York 

Irwood Fox, B.A., University of Virginia, 1956 Virginia 

Joseph Giardina, University of Maryland Maryland 

Harry Gruen, University of Miami Florida 

Ernest Lee Harris, Jr., Southern Missionary College Florida 

David William Heese, B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1953. . . .Maryland 

Sanford Sonnv Hochman, University of Maryland Marvland 

Edward Allen Hurdle, Jr., B.S, Loyola College, 1956 Maryland 

Clemuel Mansey Johnson, B.A., The University of North Carolina, 1953 

North Carolina 

49 ► 



University of Maryland 

Nicholas Irving Jones, B.S., The Citadel, 1956 South Carolina 

Norman Lewis Jones, Marshall College West Virginia 

Alan Donald Jung, B.S., University of Maryland, 1952 Maryland 

Don Samuel Killpack, B.S., University of Utah, 1951 Utah 

Irwin Kolikoff, B.S., Florida Southern College, 1953 New Hampshire 

Don Lee Koubek, A.B., West Virginia University, 1955 West Virginia 

Robert Marvin Kriegsman, The University of North Carolina . . . North Carolina 
Scot Sueki Kubota, A.B., Colorado State College, 1953; 

A.M., 1954 Hawaii 

Nicolas Lasijczuk, University of Nancy New York 

Martin Albert Levin, University of Maryland Maryland 

Marvin Paul Levin, University of Maryland Maryland 

Harry Levy, University of Maryland Maryland 

William Lee Lovern, Concord College West Virginia 

Frederick Magaziner, B.S., University of Maryland, 1954 Maryland 

Martin Magaziner, University of Maryland District of Columbia 

Frank William Mastrola, Jr., B.A., Providence College, 1956. . . .Rhode Island 

Martin Lee Mays, Woff ord College South Carolina 

David Henry McLane, Marshall College West Virginia 

John Stephen McLaughlin, West Virginia University Maryland 

John Bennett Moore, Jr., Weber College Utah 

Richard Franklin Murphy, West Virginia University West Virginia 

Theodore Jacob Noffsinger, Jr., B.A., University of Maryland, 1956. .Maryland 
Franklin Lewis Oliverio, B.S., West Virginia University, 1956. . .West Virginia 

Billy Wendel Olsen, B.A., University of California, 1955 California 

Bernard John Orlowski, Seton Hall University New Jersey 

Philip Kibbee Parsons, West Virginia University West Virginia 

Helmer Eugene Pearson, Upsala College New Jersey 

Alfred John Phillips, University of Florida Florida 

James Vincent Picone, B.S., College of the Holy Cross, 1956. ..Massachusetts 

Robert Henry Prindle, B.A., St. Michael's College, 1956 New York 

Anthony Joseph Regine, B.S., Tufts College, 1955 Rhode Island 

Jude Philip Restivo, B.S., University of Maryland, 1956 Maryland 

Ronald Lee Ripley, A.B., West Virginia University, 1955 West Virginia 

Malcolm Louis Rosenbloum, Emory University Missouri 

Georges Philippe Raynald Roy, A.B., St. Michael's College, 1956 Maine 

William Joseph Rumberger, Mount Saint Mary's College Pennsylvania 

Thomas Melvin Rutherford, West Virginia Wesleyan College . . . West Virginia 

Frank John Salino, The University of Buffalo New York 

Lawrence Francis Schaef er, St. Michael's College New York 

Roger Clare Sears, University of Maryland Maryland 

Howard Irwin Segal, University of Miami Florida 

Edwin Barry Shiller, Emory University Florida 

Joseph James Smith, Mount Saint Mary's College New York 

Robert Carroll Smith, West Virginia University West Virginia 

Alvin Jerome Snyder, B.S., University of Maryland, 1956 Maryland 

< 50 



School of Dentistry 

David M. Solomon, B.S., Fordham University, 1956 New Jersey 

Rudolph Clement Strambi, B.S., Fordham University, 1952 New Jersey 

Wayne Eugene Stroud, University of Maryland Illinois 

George Webster Struthers, Jr., B.S., Randolph-Macon College, 1952 

West Virginia 

Edward Ralph Thompson, Temple University New Jersey 

Robert Speirs Thomson, B.A., Houghton College, 1956 New Jersey 

Earle Alexander Tompkins, Jr., B.S., University of Massachusetts, 1955 

Massachusetts 

Gilbert Allen Vitek, Graceland College Maryland 

Raymond Francis Waldron, A.B., Boston College, 1956 Massachusetts 

Martin Truett Watson, B.S., Emory University, 1954 Georgia 

Irwin Robert Weiner, University of Akron Ohio 

Wayne Clark Wills, West Virginia University West Virginia 

Charles Rosser Wilson, B.S., Wake Forest College, 1956 North Carolina 

Dale Lee Wood, Western Maryland College Maryland 

Louis Yarid, A.B., Columbia University, 1956 Massachusetts 

Freshman Class 

Paul Wilfred Achin, Providence College Massachusetts 

Morris Antonelli, University of Maryland District of Columbia 

Gilbert Samuel Berman, B.S., University of Maryland, 1957 Maryland 

Cecil Samuel Boland, B.S., Newberry College, 1957 Maryland 

Lester Malcolm Breen, Emory University Georgia 

Jay Ronald Brenner, University of Miami Florida 

Donald Acker Michael Brown, B.A., St. John's College, 1951 Maryland 

Douglas Adams Bryans, B.S., Springfield College, 1957 Massachusetts 

George Franklin Buchness, B.S., Loyola College, 1948; M.S., Catholic 

University, 1954 .' Maryland 

Richard Mario Carmosino, A.B., Boston University, 1957 Massachusetts 

Thomas J. Cavanaugh, B.S., University of Maryland, 1957 Maryland 

Lawrence Leo Clark, Mount Saint Mary's College New Jersey 

James Richard Crouse, Shepherd College Maryland 

Billy Hugh Darke, B.S., Western Kentucky State College, 1954 Kentucky 

William Lawrence Doheny, Jr., University of Maryland Connecticut 

Edward Cornelius Doherty, B.A., Boston College, 1957 Massachusetts 

Marlin Duane Dunker, B.A., Walla Walla College, 1955 California 

William Duane Fitzgerald, University of Massachusetts Massachusetts 

Sheldon Donald Fliss, University of Maryland Maryland 

Richard Arnold Foer, B.S., University of Maryland, 1957. . .District of Columbia 

Joseph Edward Furtado, B.A., Providence College, 1954 Rhode Island 

William Joseph Girotti, B.A., American International College, 1957 

Massachusetts 
Raymond Emil Goepfrich, B.S., Franklin and Marshall College, 1957 

Pennsylvania 

51 ► 



University of Maryland 

John George Goettee, Jr., B.A., Western Maryland College, 1957. ..Maryland 

Melvin Goldenberg, B.A., Providence College, 1957 Rhode Island 

Aaron Rufus Griffith, Jr., University of South Carolina South Carolina 

Sheldon Gerald Gross, University of Vermont Massachusetts 

Stanford Edgar Hamburger, B.A., University of Maryland, 1957. . . .Maryland 

Arnold Hecht, University of Miami Florida 

Ronald Wesley Higel, University of Florida Florida 

William Paul Hoffman, Jr., Earlham College District of Columbia 

Patrick Francis Iacovelli, Jr., B.S., Boston College, 1952 Massachusetts 

Ronald Harold Israel, University of Maryland Maryland 

Alvin Wesley Kagey, B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1957 Maryland 

Sanford Katsumi Kamezawa, University of California Hawaii 

Stanley Paul Kaminski, B.A., Seton Hall University, 1957 New Jersey 

Douglas Kaplan, B.A., Alfred University, 1957 New Jersey 

George Theodore Keary, Yale University Massachusetts 

Michael Edward Kolakowski, Jr., B.S., University of Maryland, 1957 

Maryland 

Robert George Kovack, B.S., Albright College, 1957 New Jersey 

Ralph Leonard Kroopnick, B.A., University of Connecticut, 1957. .Connecticut 

William Herbert Lackey, Concord College West Virginia 

Robert Maurice Lattanzi, Albertus Magnus College Connecticut 

Jack Edward Liller, University of Richmond Maryland 

Arnold Irvin Loew, University of Miami Florida 

Sol Benjamin Love, Georgetown University District of Columbia 

Keith Gerald Lown, A.B., Fresno State College, 1956 California 

Edward Salters McCallum, Newberry College South Carolina 

William Edward McLaughlin, Mount Saint Mary's College New York 

Joseph Robert Marchesani, LaSalle College New Jersey 

Richard Madison Marrone, B.S., University of Maryland, 1957 Maryland 

Alan J. Martin, Ohio University Florida 

Robert Cameron Mason, University of Maryland Maryland 

Michael Charles Matzkin, B.A., Dartmouth College, 1957 Connecticut 

Robert Francis Meier, Aiount Saint Mary's College New York 

Marc Julian Meyers, B.A., Western Maryland College, 1957 Maryland 

Ronald Britton Morley, B.A., Maryville College, 1957 New York 

Clarence John Myatt, A.B., St. Michael's College, 1957 Massachusetts 

Roy Mitsuaki Naito, B.A., University of Hawaii, 1956 Hawaii 

Antone Travers Oliveira, Jr., B.S., Tufts College, 1957 Massachusetts 

James Edward Palmer, University of Maryland Maryland 

David Bertram Pere, University of Miami Florida 

Albert Perlmutter, A.B., Boston University, 1957 Massachusetts 

Garr Thomas Phelps, Xavier University Kentucky 

Joseph Michael Pistoria, Seton Hall University New Jersey 

Erwin Stuart Raffel, B.S., University of Maryland, 1956 Maryland 

Malcolm Sidney Renbaum, B.S., Johns Hopkins University, 1956 . . . .Maryland 
John Filmore Robinson, Loyola College Maryland 

* 52 



School of Dentistry 

William Otis Rockefeller, University of Maryland New York 

Theodore Almada Rosa, University of Maryland District of Columbia 

Victor Angel Rosado, B.A., Polytechnic Institute of Puerto Rico, 1957 

Puerto Rico 

David Neuman Rudo, B.S., University of Maryland, 1957 Maryland 

Peter Paul Ryiz, University of Maryland Connecticut 

Richard Daniel Sachs, University of Miami Florida 

Hershel Garvin Sawyer, A.B., Berea College, 1957 West Virginia 

Fredric Barrie Sax, A. A., George Washington University, 1956 Maryland 

Harold Mark Shavell, B.S., University of Illinois, 1957 Florida 

Robert Stanley Siegel, University of Maryland Maryland 

Melvin Jordan Slan, University of Maryland Maryland 

Edgar Farrell Smith, B.S., Wake Forest College, 1952 North Carolina 

Louis Edward Snyder, Jr., University of Maryland South Carolina 

James Miller Steig, Georgia Institute of Technology Florida 

Stanley Merrill S toller, University of Maryland Maryland 

Arthur Hein Streeter, B.S., Washington College, 1957 Maryland 

Joseph Ashley Sullivan, University of Miami Florida 

Brett Taylor Summey, B.A., University of North Carolina, 1957 

North Carolina 

John Harvey Swann, B.S., University of Maryland, 1956 Maryland 

Jerry Dale Taf t, University of Maryland Montana 

Bill Edward Taylor, University of Oklahoma Oklahoma 

Paul Irvin Teitelbaum, University of Maryland Maryland 

Donald Mathews Tilghman, University of Maryland Maryland 

George Bartholomew Towson, Washington College Maryland 

Norton Allen Tucker, University of Maryland , Maryland 

Nils Glick Wallen, B.A., Syracuse University, 1957 New Jersey 

Frederic James Wasserman, B.S., University of Florida, 1957 Florida 

Alfred Stewart Windeler, Jr., Johns Hopkins University New Jersey 

William Herbert Witherspoon, West Virginia University Pennsylvania 

Larry Emanuel Wynne, Emory University Florida 

Stanley Leonard Zakarin, University of Florida Florida 

John Francis Zulaski, B.A., American International College, 1957. . .Connecticut 



53 ► 



University of Maryland 

DEANS OF DENTAL SCHOOLS IN BALTIMORE 

BALTIMORE COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 

(Founded 1840) 

Chapin A. Harris 1840-1841 

Thomas E. Bond 1841-1842 

Washington R. Handy 1842-1853 

Philip H. Austen 1853-1865 

Ferdinand J. S. Gorgas 1865—1882 

Richard B. Winder 1882-1894 

M. Whilldin Foster 1894-1914 

William G. Foster 1914-1923 

MARYLAND DENTAL COLLEGE 

1873-1878 (Merged with B. C. D. S.) 

Richard B. Winder 1873-1878 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

(Founded 1882) 

Ferdinand J. S. Gorgas 1882— 191 1 

Timothy O. Heatwole 191 1—1923 

BALTIMORE MEDICAL COLLEGE 

1895-1913 (Merged with U. of Md.) 

J. William Smith 1895-1901 

William A. Montell 1901-1903 

T. Edgar Orrison 1903-1904 

J. William Smith 1904-1913 

BALTIMORE COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 

DENTAL SCHOOL 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

(B. C. D. S. Joined the U. of Md. 1923) 

Timothy O. Heatwole 1923-1924 

J. Ben Robinson 1924-1953 

Myron S. Aisenberg (Acting) 1953 

Myron S. Aisenberg 1954-present 

* 54 



School of Dentistry 

INDEX 

Academic Calendar 2 

Admission Requirements 11 

Admission with Advanced Standing 14 

Alumni Association 38-39 

Anatomy 22-23 

Application Procedures 13 

Arts and Sciences— Dental Program 11-13 

Attendance Requirements 14 

Biochemistry 23 

Board of Regents 1 

Curriculum, Arts— Dentistry 12 

Curriculum, Plan of 20-21 

Deans of the Baltimore Dental Schools 54 

Definition of Residence and Non-Residence 17 

Dental History and Literature 23-24 

Dental Prosthesis 

Removable Complete and Partial Prosthesis 24-25 

Fixed Partial Prosthesis 25-26 

Deportment 15 

Description of Courses 22-35 

Diagnosis 26 

Equipment Requirements 15 

Faculty Listing 3-8 

Fees 16 

Freshman Class 51-53 

Gorgas Odontological Society 37 

Grading and Promotion 14-15 

Graduating Class (1956-57 Session) 41-43 

Graduation Requirements 15-16 

Histology 26-27 

History of the School 9-10 

Junior Class 46-49 

Library 10 

Matriculation and Enrollment 13 

Medicine 

General Medicine 27 

Oral Medicine 28 

Microbiology 28-29 

Officers of Administration 3 

Officers of Instruction 3-8 

Omicron Kappa Upsilon 38 

Operative Dentistry 29-30 

Orthodontics 30 

Pathology 30-31 

55 ► 



University of Maryland 

INDEX (continued) 

Pedodontics 3 1-32 

Pharmacology 32 

Physiology 33 

Practice Administration 33-34 

Promotion and Grading 14-15 

Refunds 17 

Registration 17 

Requirements for Admission 11 

Requirements for Graduation 15-16 

Requirements for Matriculation and Enrollment 13 

Roentgenology 34 

Scholarship and Loan Funds 18-19 

Senior Class 44-46 

Senior Prize Awards 40 

Sophomore Class 49-5 1 

Summer Courses 36-37 

Student Health Service 17-18 

Surgery 34-35 

Visual Aids 35-36 



56 




^f r 



A I 'ulilicN 



of tli«_- I 



1959 1960 


JANUARY 1959 


JULY 1959 


JANUARY 1960 


JULY 1960 


S M T W T F S 
12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 
5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 


S M T W T F S 
1 2 
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


S M T W T F S 
1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 






31 


31 


FEBRUARY 


AUGUST 


FEBRUARY 


AUGUST 


S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


S M T W T F S 

1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 




23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


28 29 


28 29 30 31 




30 31 






MARCH 


SEPTEMBER 


MARCH 


SEPTEMBER 


S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 


S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 


S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 


S M T W T F S 
1 2 3 
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 


APRIL 


OCTOBER 


APRIL 


OCTOBER 


S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 
5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 


S M T W T F S 
12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


S M T W T F S 
1 2 
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


S M T W T F S 
1 
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 


MAY 


NOVEMBER 


MAY 


NOVEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 2 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


12 3 4 5 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


29 30 


29 30 31 


27 28 29 30 


JUNE 


DECEMBER 


JUNE 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 6 


12 3 4 5 


12 3 4 


1 2 3 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


5 6 7 8 9 10 11 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


28 29 30 


27 28 29 30 31 


26 27 28 29 30 


25 26 27 28 29 30 31 



ONE HUNDRED AND NINETEENTH CATALOGUE 

with 
Announcements For 

The 1959-1960 Session 




BALTIMORE COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 
DENTAL SCHOOL 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 



THE PROVISIONS of this publication are not to be regarded as an irrevocable con- 
tract between the student and the University or Maryland. The University reserves 
the right to change any provision or requirement at any time within the student's 
term of residence. The University further reserves the right at any time, to ask a 
student to withdraw when it considers such action to be in the best interests of the 
University. 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

and 

MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE 

Term 

Expires 

Charles P. McCormick 

Chairman 1966 

McCormick and Company, 414 Light Street, Baltimore 2 

Edward F. Holter 

V ice-Chairman 1968 

The National Grange, 744 Jackson Place, N.W., Washington 6 

Harry H. Nuttle 

Treasurer 1966 

Denton 

B. Herbert Brown 

Secretary 1960 

The Baltimore Institute, 12 West Madison Street, Baltimore 1 

Louis L. Kaplan 

Assistant Secretary 1961 

5800 Park Heights Avenue, Baltimore 15 

William C. Walsh 1968 

Cumberland 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst 1968 

4101 Greenway, Baltimore 18 

Thomas W. Pangborn 1965 

The Pangborn Corporation, Pangborn Blvd., Hagerstown 

Enos S. Stockbridge 1960 

10 Light Street, Baltimore 2 

Thomas B. Symons 1963 

Suburban Trust Company, 6950 Carroll Avenue, Takoma Park 

C. Ewing Tuttle 1962 

907 Latrobe Building, Charles and Read Streets, Baltimore 2 



Members of the Board are appointed by the Governor of the State for terms of nine 
years each, beginning the first Monday in June. 

The President of the University of Maryland is, by law, Executive Officer of the 
Board. 

The State law provides that the Board of Regents of the University of Maryland 
shall constitute the Maryland State Board of Agriculture. 



University of Maryland 

ACADEMIC CALENDAR 

1959-1960 Session 

First Semester 

1959 

September 21 Monday Orientation Program for Freshman Class 

September 22 Tuesday Registration for Freshman Class 

September 23 Wednesday . . . Registration for Sophomore Class 

September 24 Thursday .... Registration for Junior and Senior Classes 

September 25 Friday Instruction begins with first scheduled period 

November 24 Tuesday Thanksgiving recess begins at close of last 

scheduled period 

November 30 Monday Instruction resumes with first scheduled period 

December 18 Friday Christmas recess begins at close of last 

scheduled period 

1960 

January 4 Monday Instruction resumes with first scheduled period 

January 25 Monday, 

and 26 Tuesday Second Semester Registration 

February 3 Wednesday . . . First Semester ends at the close of last 

scheduled period 

Second Semester 

February 4 Thursday .... Instruction begins with first scheduled period 

February 22 Monday Washington's Birthday— holiday 

April 14 Thursday Easter recess begins at close of last scheduled 

period 

April 19 Tuesday Instruction resumes with first scheduled period 

May 30 Monday Memorial Day— holiday 

June 1 Wednesday . . . Second Semester ends at close of last 

scheduled period 
June 4 Saturday Commencement 



A student who registers after instruction begins must pay a late registration fee of 
$5.00. No late registration will be approved after Saturday of the first week of in- 
struction. 



School of Dentistry 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

wilson homer elkins, President of the University 

B.A., M.A., B.LITT., D.PHIL. 

MYRON S. AISENBERG, Dean 
D.D.S. 

Katharine toomey, Administrative Assistant 

LL.D. 

c. watson algire, Director of Admissions and Registrations 

B.A., M.S. 

norma j. azlein, Registrar 

B.A. 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 
1958-1959 SESSION 
Emeritus 
j. ben robinson, Dean Emeritus 

D.D.S., D.SC. 

Professors 

myron s. aisenberg, Professor of Pathology 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1922. 

Joseph calton BiDDix, jr., Professor of Oral Diagnosis 
d.d.s. , University of Maryland, 1934. 

Edward c. dobbs, Professor of Pharmacology and Therapeutics 
d.d.s., University of" Maryland, 1929; b.s., 1952. 

brice marden dorsey, Professor of Oral Surgery 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1927. 

Gardner Patrick henry Foley, Professor of Dental Literature 
b.a., Clark University, 1923; m.a., 1926. 

grayson wilbur gaver, Professor of Dental Prosthesis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1922. 

william edward hahn, Professor of Anatomy 

d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1931; a.b., University of Rochester, 1938; M.S., 1939. 

jose e. Medina, Professor of Operative Dentistry 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1948. 

ernest b. nuttall, Professor of Fixed Partial Prosthesis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1931. 

Robert harold oster, Professor of Physiology 

b.s., The Pennsylvania State University, 1923; m.s., 1926; ph.d., Harvard Uni- 
versity, 1933. 

3 ► 



University of Maryland 

kyrle w. preis, Professor of Orthodontics 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1929. 

d. vincent provenza, Professor of Histology and Embryology 
b.s., University o£ Maryland, 1939; M.S., 1941; ph.d., 1952. 

donald E. shay, Professor of Microbiology 

b.s., Lebanon Valley College, 1937; M.S., University of Maryland, 1938; ph.d., 1943 

E. G. vanden bosche, Professor of Biochemistry 

a.b., Lebanon Valley College, 1922; M.S., University of Maryland, 1924; ph.d., 1927. 

Associate Professors 

William Robert biddington, Associate Professor of Oral Medicine 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1948. 

Joseph Patrick cappuccio, Associate Professor of Oral Surgery 

b.s., University of Rhode Island, 1943; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1946. 

Stanley h. dosh, Associate Professor of Pixed Partial Prosthesis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1935. 

harold golton, Associate Professor of Oral Diagnosis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1925. 

william lee graham, Associate Professor of Oral Diagnosis 
b.s., Marietta College, 1948; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1953. 

yam-hin louie, Associate Professor of Operative Dentistry 

b.s., Lingnan University, Canton, China, 1938; d.d.s., Northwestern University, 
1945; m.s.d., 1946. 

george mclean, Associate Professor of Physical Diagnosis and Principles of 
Medicine 

m.d., University of Maryland, 1916. 

peter mclean lu, Associate Professor of Pixed Partial Prosthesis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1934. 

Walter l. oggesen, Associate Professor of Fixed Partial Prosthesis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1926. 

burton Robert pollack, Associate Professor of Physiology 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1946. 

wilbur owen ramsey, Associate Professor of Dental Prosthesis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1943. 

douglas john sanders, Associate Professor of Pedodontics 
b.s., Northwestern University, 1946; d.d.s., 1948. 

E. Roderick shipley, Associate Professor of Physiology 

a.b., The Johns Hopkins University, 1938; m.d., University of Maryland, 1942. 

guy paul Thompson, Associate Professor of Anatomy 
a.b., West Virginia University, 1923; a.m., 1929. 



School of Dentistry 

l. edward warmer, Associate Professor of Dental Prosthesis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1931. 

tobias Weinberg, Associate Professor of Pathology 
a.b., The Johns Hopkins University, 1930; m.d., 1933. 

Assistant Professors 

irving i. abramson, Assistant Professor of Oral Medicine 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1932. 

alvin david aisenberg, Assistant Professor of Pathology 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1945. 

hugh m. clement, jr., Assistant Professor of Operative Dentistry 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1944. 

fred ehrlich, Assistant Professor of Pedodontics 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1947. 

calvin Joseph gaver, Assistant Professor of Operative Dentistry 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1950; d.d.s., 1954. 

conrad l. inman, Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology 
d.d.s., Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, 1915. 

William kress, Assistant Professor of Orthodontics 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1936. 

george w. piavis, Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

a.b., Western Maryland College, 1948; m.ed., 1952; ph.d., Duke University, 1958. 

Norton morris ross, Assistant Professor of Pharmacology 

b.s., University of Connecticut, 1949; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1954. 

daniel edward shehan, Assistant Professor of Orthodontics 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1922. 

arthur g. siwinski, Assistant Professor of Oral Surgery 

a.b., The Johns Hopkins University, 1927; m.d., University of Maryland, 1931. 

d. robert swinehart, Assistant Professor of Orthodontics 

a.e., Dartmouth College, 1933; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1937. 

edmond g. vanden bosche, Assistant Professor of Tooth Morphology 

b.s., The Pennsylvania State University, 1943; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1947. 

david h. willer, Assistant Professor of Full Denture Prosthesis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1933. 

Special Lecturers 

martin helrich, Professor of Anesthesiology (School of Medicine') 
b.s., Dickinson College, 1946; m.d.. University of Pennsylvania, 1946. 

richard lindeneerg, Lecturer in Neuroanatomy 
m.d., University of Berlin, 1944. 

ethelbert lovett, Lecturer in Ethics 

d.d.s... Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, 1922. 



University of Maryland 

william j. o'donnell, Lecturer in jurisprudence 

a.b., Loyola College, 1937; ll.e., University of Maryland, 1941. 

harry m. robinson, jr., Professor of Dermatology {School of Medicme) 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1931; m.d., 1935. 

george herschel yeager, Professor of Clinical Surgery (School of Medicine) 
b.s., West Virginia University, 1927; m.d., University of Maryland, 1929. 

g. richard fravel, Lecturer in Principles of Medicine 
m.d., University of Maryland, 1949. 

Instructors 

Robert l. bartlett, Instructor in Pedodontics 

b.a., The Johns Hopkins University, 1953; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1957. 

sterrett p. beaven, Instructor in Operative Dentistry 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1941. 

Stanley s. brager, Instructor in Pharmacology and Therapeutics 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1954; d.d.s., 1958. 

samuel hollinger bryant, Instructor in Oral Diagnosis 

a.b., Western Maryland College, 1928; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1932. 

thomas c. cheng, Instructor in Histology and Embryology 

a.b., Wayne State University, 1952; m.s., University of Virginia, 1956; ph.d., 1958. 

thomas f. clement, Instructor in Oral Medicine 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1951. 

jerome s. cullen, Instructor in Clinical Orthodontics 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1941. 

jose h. diaz, Instructor in Operative Dentistry 

b.s., University of Puerto Rico, 1941; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1950. 

ralph jack Gordon, Instructor in Dental Prosthesis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1933. 

marvin m. graham, Instructor in Fixed Partial Prosthesis 

a.b., Cornell University, 1938; a.m., 1939; d.d.s., University of Pennsylvania, 1943. 

Walter granruth, jr., Instructor in Pathology 

b.s., Loyola College, 1950; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1954. 

m. eugene hinds, Instructor in Oral Surgery 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1952. 

john m. hyson, Instructor in Oral Surgery 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1950. 

melvin john jagielski, Instructor in Tooth Morphology 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1953. 



School of Dentistry 

ralph l. kercheval, Instructor in Pedodontics 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1956. 

paul F. kiefman, Instructor in Roentgenology 

b.s., American University, 1951; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1958. 

Anthony j. klein, Instructor in Roentgenology 

b.s., University of Cincinnati, 1954; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1958. 

lester lebo, Instructor in Oral Diagnosis 
b.s., University of Chicago, 1938; m.d., 1941. 

charles brown Leonard, jr., Instructor in Biochemistry 

b.a., Rutgers College of South Jersey, 1955; m.s., University of Maryland, 1957. 

richard r. c. Leonard, Instructor in Public Health Dentistry 

d.d.s., Indiana University, 1922; m.s.p.h., University of Michigan, 1944. 

Herbert c levin, Instructor in Operative Dentistry 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1958. 

charles e. loveman, Instructor in Anatomy 

a.b., The Johns Hopkins University, 1935; d.d.s., Columbia University, 1939. 

martin h. morris, Instructor in Biochemistry 
b.s., Rutgers University, 1952; m.s., 1954. 

william h. neilund, Instructor in Operative Dentistry 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1951; d.d.s., 1958. 

james p. norris, Instructor in Oral Medicine 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1950; d.d.s., 1956. 

frank n. ogden, Instructor in First Aid and in Charge of Medical Care of Stu- 
dents 
m.d., University of Maryland, 1917. 

victor s. primrose, Instructor in Pull Denture Prosthesis 
d.d.s., McGill University, 1918. 

myron hillard sachs, Instructor in Anatomy 

d.d.s., Columbia University, 1939. 
aaron schaeffer, Instructor in Clinical Orthodontics 

b.a., Western Maryland College, 1939; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1947; M.S., 

University of Illinois, 1948. 

Leonard s. Schneider, Instructor in Oral Surgery 

a.b., Johns Hopkins University, 1957; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1958. 

leah m. p. staling, Instructor in Physiology 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1944; m.s., 1948. 

glenn d. Steele, Instructor in Vixed Partial Prosthesis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1942. 



University of Maryland 

claude p. taylor, Director of Visual Education 

earlb Harris watson, Instructor in Dental Materials and Dental Prosthesis 
a.b. University of North Carolina, 1938; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1942. 

louis weiss, Instructor in Oral Diagnosis 

b.s., University of Maryland, 1959; d.d.s., 1958. 

nelson a. wright, Instructor in Full Denture Prosthesis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1955. 

Graduate Assistants 

peter l. johnson, Graduate Assistant in Oral Surgery 

b.a., Hofstra College, 1953; d.d.s., Georgetown University, 1957. 

john j. Jordan, Graduate Assistant in Histology and Embryology 
b.s., University of Scranton, 1957. 

William e. trail, Graduate Assistant in Microbiology 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1958. 

Library Staff 

ida marian robinson, Librarian and Associate Professor of Library Science 

a.b., Cornell University, 1924; b.s.l.s., Columbia University School of Library 
Service, 1944. 

Hilda E. moore, Associate Librarian and Assistant Professor of Library Science 
a.b., Randolph-Macon Woman's College, 1936; a.b.l.s., Emory University Library 
School, 1937. 

Beatrice Marriott, Reference Librarian 
a.b., University of Maryland, 1944. 

edith m. coyle, Periodicals Librarian 

a.b., University of North Carolina, 1937; a.b.l.s., University of North Carolina 
School of Library Science, 1939; m.a., The Johns Hopkins University, 1945. 

harriette w. shelton, Chief Cataloguer 

b.a., The Pennsylvania State College, 1935; b.s.l.s., Columbia University School of 
Library Sendee, 1937. 

marjorie fluck, Cataloguer 

b.s. in ed., Kutztown State Teachers College, 1952. 

Rosalie c. carroll, Library Assistant 

Elizabeth E. mccoach, Assistant to the Librarian 

Patricia c. terzi, Assistant to the Cataloguer 



THE SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 
History 

THE BALTIMORE COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY OCCUPIES AN IMPORTANT AND 
interesting place in the history of dentistry. At the end of the regular ses- 
sion— 1958-59— it completed its one hundred and nineteenth year of service to 
dental education. The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery represents the first 
effort in history to offer institutional dental education to those anticipating the 
practice of dentistry. 

The first lectures on dentistry in America were delivered by Dr. Horace 
H. Hayden in the University of Maryland, School of Medicine, between the 
years 1823-25. These lectures were interrupted in 1825 by internal dissensions 
in the School of Medicine and were as a consequence discontinued. It was Dr. 
Hayden's idea that dental education merited greater attention than had been 
given it by medicine or could be given it by the preceptorial plan of dental 
teaching then in vogue. 

Dr. Horace H. Hayden began the practice of dentistry in Baltimore in 1800. 
From that time he made a zealous attempt to lay the foundation for a scientific, 
serviceable dental profession. In 1831 Dr. Chapin A. Harris came to Baltimore 
to study under Hayden. Dr. Harris was a man of unusual ability and possessed 
special qualifications to aid in establishing and promoting formal dental educa- 
tion. Since Dr. Hayden's lectures had been interrupted at the University of 
Maryland and there was an apparent unsurmountable difficulty confronting the 
creation of dental departments in medical schools, an independent college was 
decided upon. A charter was applied for and granted by the Maryland Legis- 
lature February 1, 1840. The first Faculty meeting was held February 3, 1840, 
at which time Dr. Horace H. Hayden was elected President and Dr. Chapin A. 
Harris, Dean. The introductory lecture was delivered by Dr. Hayden on Novem- 
ber 3, 1840, to the five students matriculating in the first class. Thus was 
created as the foundation of the present dental profession the Baltimore College 
of Dental Surgery, the first dental school in the world. 

Hayden and Harris, the admitted founders of conventional dental education, 
contributed, in addition to the factor of dental education, other opportunities for 
professional growth and development. In 1839 the American Journal of Dental 
Science was founded, with Chapin A. Harris as its editor. Dr. Harris continued 
fully responsible for dentistry's initial venture into periodic dental literature to 
the time of his death. The files of the old American journal of Dental Science 
testify to the fine contributions made by Dr. Harris. In 1840 the American 
Society of Dental Surgeons was founded, with Dr. Horace H. Hayden as its 
President and Dr. Chapin A. Harris as its Corresponding Secretary. This was 
the beginning of dental organization in America, and was the forerunner of the 
American Dental Association, which now numbers approximately ninety-three 
thousand in its present membership. The foregoing suggests the unusual in- 
fluence Baltimore dentists and the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery have 
exercised on professional ideals and policies. 



University of Maryland 

In 1873, the Maryland Dental College, an offspring of the Baltimore College 
of Dental Surgery, was organized. It continued instruction until 1878, at which 
time it was consolidated with the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery. A de- 
partment of dentistry was organized at the University of Maryland in the year 
1882, graduating a class each year from 1883 to 1923. This school was chartered 
as a corporation and continued as a privately owned and directed institution until 
1920, when it became a State institution. The Dental Department of the Balti- 
more Medical College was established in 1895, continuing until 1913, when it 
merged with the Dental Department of the University of Maryland. 

The final combining of the dental educational interests of Baltimore was 
effected June 15, 1923, by the amalgamation of the student bodies of the Balti- 
more College of Dental Surgery and the University of Maryland, School of 
Dentistry; the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery becoming a distinct depart- 
ment of the University under State supervision and control. Thus we find in the 
Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, University of Maryland, a 
merging of the various efforts at dental education in Maryland. From these 
component elements have radiated developments of the art and science of dentis- 
try until the strength of its alumni is second to none, in either number or degree 
of service to the profession. 

Library 

This School is fortunate in having one of the better equipped and organized 
libraries among the dental schools of the country. The library is located in the 
main building and consists of a stack room, offices and a reading room accom- 
modating ninety-six students. Over 16,000 books and bound journals on dentistry 
and the collateral sciences, together with numerous pamphlets, reprints and un- 
bound journals, are available for the student's use. More than 200 journals are 
regularly received by the Library. An adequate staff promotes the growth of 
the Library and assists the student body in the use of the Library's resources. 
One of the most important factors of the dental student's education is to teach 
him the value and the use of dental literature in his formal education and in 
promoting his usefulness and value to the profession during practice. The Balti- 
more College of Dental Surgery is ideally equipped to achieve this aim of dental 
instruction. 



Course of Instruction 

The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, University of 
Maryland offers a course in dentistry devoted to instruction in the medical 
sciences, the dental sciences, and clinical practice. Instruction consists of didactic 
lectures, laboratory instruction, demonstrations, conferences, quizzes and hos- 
pital ward rounds. Topics are assigned for collateral reading to train the student 
in the value and use of dental literature. The curriculum for the complete 
course appears on pages 21 and 22 of this catalogue. 

<+ 10 



School of Dentistry 

Requirements for Admission 

Applicants for admission must present evidence of having completed success- 
fully two academic years of work in an accredited college of arts and sciences 
based upon the completion of a four-year high school course or the equivalent 
in entrance examinations. The college course must include at least a year's 
credit in English, in biology, in physics, in inorganic chemistry, and in organic 
chemistry. All required science courses shall include both classroom and labor- 
atory instruction. Although a minimum of 60 semester hours of credit, exclusive 
of physical education and military science, is required, additional courses in the 
humanities and the natural and social sciences are desirable. By ruling of the 
Dean's Council, all admission requirements must be completed by June 30 previ- 
ous to the desired date of admission. 

In considering candidates for admission, the Board of Admissions will give 
preference to those applicants who have high scholastic records in secondary 
school and in college; who make satisfactory scores in the dental aptitude test; 
who present favorable recommendations from their respective predental com- 
mittee or from one instructor in each of the departments of biology, chemistry, 
and physics; and who, in all other respects, give every promise of becoming suc- 
cessful students and dentists of high standing. Applicants will not be admitted 
with unabsolved conditions or unabsolved failures. 

Combined Arts and Sciences-Dental Program 

The University offers a combined arts and sciences-dental curriculum lead- 
ing to the degrees of Bachelor of Science and Doctor of Dental Surgery. The 
preprofessional part of this curriculum shall be taken in residence in the College 
of Arts and Sciences at College Park, and the professional part in the School of 
Dentistry in Baltimore. 

Students who elect the combined program and who have completed the arts 
and sciences phase of it may, upon the recommendation of the Dean of the 
School of Dentistry, be granted the degree of Bachelor of Science by the College 
of Arts and Sciences at the first summer commencement following the comple- 
tion of the student's first year in the School of Dentistry. A student may enter 
the arts and sciences-dental program at College Park with advanced standing 
from an accredited college or university, but the last year of the preprofessional 
training must be completed at College Park and the professional training must 
be completed in the School of Dentistry of the University of Maryland. 



11 ► 



University of Maryland 

ARTSD£NTISTRY CURRICULUM 

t — Semester- 
Freshman Year I U 

Eng. 1, 2— Composition and American Literature 3 3 

Zool. 1— General Zoology 4 

Zool. 2-The Animal Phyla 4 

Chem. 1, 3— General Chemistry 4 4 

Math. 10, 11— Algebra, Trigonometry, Analytic Geometry.... 3 3 

Speech 7 . . 2 

Physical Activities 1 1 

A. S. 1, 2-Basic Air Force ROTC (Men) 2 2 

Hw. 2, 4-Hygiene (Women) 2 2 

Total 17 19 

Sophomore Year 

Eng. 3, 4 or 5, 6— Composition and World or English 

Literature 3 3 

"Group I Elective 3 

G. & P. 1— American Government . . 3 

Chem. 35, 36, 37, 38-Organic Chemistry 4 4 

H. 5, 6— History of American Civilization 3 3 

'Modern Language 3 3 

Physical Activities 1 1 

A. S. 3, 4-Basic Air Force ROTC (Men) 2 2 






Total 17-19 17-19 



Junior Year 

Modern Language (continued) 3 3 

Phys. 10, 1 1— Fundamentals of Physics 4 4 

Approved Minor Courses 6 6 

Electives 3 3 

Total 16 16 

Senior Year 

The curriculum of the first year of the School of Dentistry of the University 
of Maryland is accepted by the College of Arts and Sciences as the fourth year 
(major sequence) of academic work toward the degree of Bachelor of Science. 



"Group I Electives: Sociology 1, Philosophy 1, Psychology 1, Economics 37. 

** Students planning to request admission to a Dental School with only two years 
of predental training should take Physics 10-11. 

"Fr. 6, 7 or Ger. 6, 7— (Intermediate Scientific French or German) recommended. 



***■ 



< 12 



School of Dentistry 

If at the end of the junior year the student decides to postpone his entrance 
to the School of Dentistry and to remain in the College of Arts and Sciences 
and complete work for the Bachelor's degree, he may choose a major and minor 
in any of the departments in which he has completed the necessary underclass 
requirements. The general nature of the first three years of this curriculum and 
the generous electives of the third year make possible for the student a wide 
choice of departments in which he may specialize. In general the electives of 
the third year will be chosen as for a major in some particular department. 

Requirements for Matriculation and Enrollment 

In the selection of students to begin the study of dentistry the School con- 
siders particularly a candidate's proved ability in secondary education and his 
successful completion of prescribed courses in predental collegiate training. The 
requirements for admission and the academic regulations of the College of Arts 
and Sciences, University of Maryland, are strictly adhered to by the School of 
Dentistry. 

A student is not regarded as having matriculated in the School of Dentistry 
until such time as he shall have paid the matriculation fee of $10.00, and is not 
enrolled until he shall have paid a deposit of $200.00. This deposit is intended 
to insure registration in the class and is not returnable. 

Application Procedures 

Candidates seeking admission to the Dental School should first write to the 
Office of the Dean requesting an application form. Upon the receipt and the 
examination of this form by the Board of Admissions an application blank will be 
sent to those candidates who merit consideration. Each applicant should fill out 
the blank in its entirety and mail it promptly, together with the application fee 
and photographs, to the Board of Admissions, Dental School, University of 
Maryland, Baltimore 1, Maryland. The early filing of an application is urged. 
Applications may be filed after June 1 of the year previous to the desired date 
of admission and during the next nine months (to March 1). Applicants wishing 
advice on any problem relating to their predental training or their application 
should communicate with the Board of Admissions. 

All applicants will be required to take the Dental Aptitude Test. This test 
will be given at various testing centers throughout the United States, its pos- 
sessions and Canada. Applicants will be notified by the Council on Dental Educa- 
tion of the American Dental Association of the dates of the tests and the locations 
of the testing centers. 

Promising candidates will be required to appear before the Board of Ad- 
missions for an interview. On the basis of all available information the best 
possible applicants will be chosen for admission to the School. 

A certificate of entrance will be issued to each successful applicant, which will 
permit him to matriculate and to register in the class to which he has applied. 

13 ► 



University of Maryland 

Admission with Advanced Standing 

(a) Graduates in medicine or students in medicine who have completed two 
or more years in a medical school, acceptable to standards in the School of 
Medicine, University of Maryland, may be given advanced standing to the 
Sophomore year provided the applicant shall complete under competent regu- 
lar instruction the courses in dental technology regularly scheduled in the first 
year. 

(b) Applicants for transfer must (1) meet fully the requirements for 
admission to the first year of the dental course; (2) be eligible for promotion to 
the next higher class in the school from which he seeks to transfer; (3) show an 
average grade of five per cent above the passing mark in the school where transfer 
credits were earned; (4) show evidence of scholastic attainments, character and 
personality; (5) present letter of honorable dismissal and recommendation from 
the dean of the school from which he transfers. 

(c) All applicants for transfer must present themselves in person for an 
interview before qualifying certificate can be issued. 

Attendance Requirements 

In order to receive credit for a full session, each student must have entered 
and be in attendance on the day the regular session opens, at which time lectures 
to all classes begin, and remain until the close of the session, the dates for which 
are announced in the calendar of the annual catalogue. 

Regular attendance is demanded. A student whose attendance in any course 
is unsatisfactory to the head of the department will be denied the privilege of 
final examination in any and all such courses. A student with less than 85 per 
cent attendance will not be promoted to the next succeeding year. However, 
in certain unavoidable circumstances of absences, the Dean and the Council 
may honor excuses exceeding the maximum permitted. 

Grading and Promotion 

The following symbols are used as marks for final grades: A (100-91), 
B (90-84), C (83-77), and D (76-70), Passing; F (below 70), Failure; I, In- 
complete. Progress grades in courses are indicated as "Satisfactory" and "Un- 
satisfactory." 

A Failure in any subject may be removed only by repeating the subject in full. 
Students who have done work of acceptable quality in their completed assign- 
ments but who, because of circumstances beyond their control, have been unable 
to finish all assignments, will be given an Incomplete. A student shall not carry 
an Incomplete into the next succeeding year. When he has completed the 
requirements for the removal of an Incomplete, the student shall be given 
the actual grade earned in the course. 

< 14 



School of Dentistry 

Scholastic averages are computed on the basis of semester credits assigned to 
each course and numerical values for gradues. The numerical values are A-4; 
B-3; C-2; DT; F-0. The grade point average is the sum of the products of 
semester credits and grade values, divided by the total number of semester credits. 

Students who attain a grade point average of 1.5 in the Freshman year will 
be promoted. At the end of the Sophomore year an overall grade point average 
of 1.75 is required for promotion. A grade point average of 2.0 is required for 
promotion to the Senior year and for graduation. 

Students who fail to meet the minimum grade point averages required for 
promotion and who fall into the following categories will be allowed proba- 
tionary promotion: 

1. Freshmen who attain a grade point average of 1.25-1.49. 

2. Sophomores who attain an overall grade point average of 1.6-1.74. 

3. Juniors who attain an overall grade point average of 1.85-1.99. 

Probationary status will not be permitted for two successive years. 

A student may absolve a total of eight credit hours of failure in an ac- 
credited summer school provided he has the grade point average required for 
promotion or graduation, excluding the failure or failures which he has incurred. 

Equipment 

A complete list of necessary instruments and materials for technic and clinic 
courses is prescribed by the Dental School. Arrangements are made by the 
Dental School in advance of formal enrollment for books, instruments and ma- 
terials to be delivered to the students at the opening of school. Each student is 
required to provide himself promptly with these prescribed necessities. A student 
who does not meet this requirement will not be permitted to continue with his 
class. 



Deportment 

The profession of dentistry demands, and the School of Dentistry requires, 
of its students evidence of their good moral character. The conduct of the 
student in relation to his work and fellow students will indicate his fitness to 
be taken into the confidence of the community as a professional man. Integrity, 
sobriety, temperate habits, truthfulness, respect for authority and associates and 
honesty in the transaction of business affairs as a student will be considered as 
evidence of good moral character necessary to the granting of a degree. 

Requirements for Graduation 

The degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery is conferred upon a candidate who 
has met the following conditions: 

15 ► 



University of Maryland 

1. A candidate must furnish documentary evidence that he has attained 
the age of 21 years. 

2. A candidate for graduation shall have attended the full scheduled course 
of four academic years. 

3. He will be required to show a grade point average of 2.0 for the full 
course of study. 

4. He shall have satisfied all technic and clinic requirements of the various 
departments. 

5. He shall have paid all indebtedness to the college prior to the beginning 
of final examinations, and must have adjusted his financial obligations in the 
community satisfactorily to those to whom he may be indebted. 

Student Fees 

Matriculation fee (required of all entering students) $ 10.00 

Tuition (each year): 

Non-resident student 675.00 

Resident student 400.00 

Student health service (each year) 20.00 

Student Union fee 30.00 

The Student Union Fee is payable by all students enrolled in 
the Professional Schools on the Baltimore campus and is used to 
pay interest on and amortize the cost of construction of the Union 
Building. 

Special Fee 10.00 

The Special Fee is payable by all full-time students enrolled in 
the Professional Schools on the Baltimore campus and is used to 
finance equipment for the Union Building. 
Laboratory breakage deposit: 

Freshman year 10.00 

Sophomore and Junior years 5.00 

In addition to fees itemized in the above schedule, the following assess- 
ments are made by the University: 
Application fee (paid at time of filing formal application for admission) 7.50 

Late registration fee 5.00 

(All students are expected to complete their registration, including 
payment of bills, on the regular registration days.) Those who do 
not complete their registration during the prescribed days will be 
charged a fee of $5.00. 

Examinations taken out of class and re-examinations . . . 5.00 

One certified transcript of record is issued free of charge. 

Each additional copy is issued only upon payment of 1 .00 

Summer Session students will pay a $6.00 Student Union Fee but will 
not pay the Special Fee. 

«« 16 



School of Dentistry 



Postgraduate Courses 



Postgraduate courses may be offered to qualified dental graduates. These 
courses are designed to provide opportunities for study in special fields on a 
refresher level, and are arranged so that particular emphasis is placed on 
clinical practices. 

Graduate Student Fees 

Matriculation Fee (for new students only, non-returnable) 10.00 

Tuition Fee (per semester credit hour) 12.00 

Tuition Fee for students carrying ten or more credit hours per 

semester 120.00 

Laboratory Fees where applicable are charged at the rate of $5.00 
per semester hour of laboratory credit. 

Student Union Fee 

Students carrying ten or more credit hours per semester (per annum) ""30.00 

Students carrying less than ten credit hours per semester (per 

annum) *6.00 

Special Fee 

Students carrying ten or more credit hours per semester (per 

annum) * 10.00 

Graduation Fee 

Master's Degree 10.00 

Doctor's Degree (including hood and microfilming of thesis) 50.00 

REFUNDS 

According to the policy of the University no fees will be returned. In case 
the student discontinues his course or fails to register after a place has been 
reserved in a class, any fees paid will be credited to a subsequent course, but 
are not transferable. 



Registration 

The registration of a student in any school or college of the University 
shall be regarded as a registration in the University of Maryland, but when 
such student transfers to a professional school of the University or from one 



* Students who initially enroll for the second semester of the school year will be 
assessed at the rate of one half of the rates shown above. 

17 ► 



University of Maryland 

professional school to another, he must pay the usual matriculation fee required 
by each professional school. 

Each student is required to fill in a registration card for the office of the 
Registrar, and make payment of one-half of the tuition fee in addition to all 
other fees noted as payable before being admitted to classwork at the opening 
of the session. The remainder of tuition and fees must be in the hands of the 
Comptroller during registration period for the second half of the academic year. 

Definition of Residence and Non-Residence 

Students who are minors are considered to be resident students if at the 
time of their registration their parents have been domiciled in this state for 
at least one year. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of his 
first registration in the University, and may not thereafter be changed by him 
unless, in the case of a minor, his parents move to and become legal residents 
of the state by maintaining such residence for at least one full year. How- 
ever, the right of the minor student to change from a non-resident to resident 
status must be established by him prior to the registration period for any 
semester. 

Adult students are considered to be residents if at the time of their registra- 
tion they have been domiciled in Maryland for at least one year provided such 
residence has not been acquired while attending any school or college in Mary- 
land or elsewhere. Time spent on active duty in the armed services while sta- 
tioned in Maryland will not be considered as satisfying the one year period 
referred to above except in those cases in which the adult was domiciled in 
Maryland for at least one year prior to his entrance into the armed service and 
was not enrolled in any school during that period. 

The word domicile as used in this regulation shall mean the permanent 
place of abode. For the purpose of this rule only one domicile may be claimed 
as a permanent abode. 

Student Health Service 

The School undertakes to supply medical and surgical care for its students 
through the Student Health Service. This care includes the daily services 
rendered by a physician and a graduate nurse in a well-equipped clinic, conven- 
iently located in the Dental School. Also consultations, surgical procedures and 
hospitalization, judged to be necessary by the Service, are covered under liberal 
limitations, depending on length of hospitalization and special expenses incurred. 

Students who need medical attention are expected to report at the office 
of the Student Health Service. Under circumstances requiring home treatment, 
the students will be visited at their College residences. 

M 18 



School of Dentistry 

It is not within the scope of the Service to provide medical care for con- 
ditions antedating each annual registration in the University; nor is it the 
function of this Service to treat chronic conditions contracted by students before 
admission or to extend treatment to acute conditions developing in the period 
between academic years or during authorized school vacations. The cost of 
orthopedic applicances, the correction of visual defects, the services of special 
nurses, and special medication must be paid for by the student. The School 
does not accept responsibility for illness or accident occurring away from the 
community, or for expenses incurred for hospitalization or medical services in 
institutions other than the University Hospital, or, in any case, for medical 
expense not authorized by the Student Health Service. 

Every new student is required to undergo a complete physical examination, 
which includes oral diagnosis. Any defects noted must be corrected within the 
first school year. The passing of this examination is a requirement for the final 
acceptance of any student. 

Each matriculant must present, on the day of his enrollment, a statement 
from his ophthalmologist regarding the condition of his eyes, and where defects 
in vision exist he shall show evidence that corrections have been made. 

If a student should enter the hospital during the academic year, the Service 
will arrange for the payment of part or all of the hospital expenses, depending 
on the length of stay and the special expenses incurred. This arrangement applies 
only to students admitted through the office of the School physician. 

Prospective students are advised to have any known physical defects corrected 
before entering the School in order to prevent loss of time which later correction 
might involve. 



Scholarship and Loan Funds 

A number of scholarship loans from various organizations and educational 
foundations are available to students in the School of Dentistry. These loans 
are offered on the basis of excellence in scholastic attainment and the need on 
the part of students for assistance in completing their course in dentistry. It 
has been the policy of the Faculty to recommend only students in the last two 
years for such privileges. 

The Henry Strong Educational Foundation 

From this fund, established under the will of General Henry Strong of 
Chicago, an annual allotment is made to the Baltimore College of Dental 
Surgery, Dental School, University of Maryland, for scholarship loans available 
for the use of young men and women students under the age of twenty-five. 
Recommendations for the privileges of these loans are limited to students in the 
Junior and Senior years. Only students who through stress of circumstances 

19 ► 



University of Maryland 

require financial aid and who have demonstrated excellence in educational pro- 
gress are considered in making nominations to the secretary of this fund. 

The Edward S. Gaylord Educational Endowment Fund 

Under a provision of the will of the late Dr. Edward S. Gaylord, of New 
Haven, Connecticut, an amount approximating $16,000 was left to the Baltimore 
College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, University of Maryland, the proceeds 
of which are to be devoted to aiding worthy young men in securing dental 
education. 

The W. K. Kellogg Foundation 

During World War II the Foundation recognized the burden that the 
accelerated course imposed upon many dental students who under normal cir- 
cumstances would earn money for their education by employment during the 
summer vacation. The Foundation granted to this School a fund to provide 
rotating loans to deserving dental students. 

The Albert A. Harrington Fund 

This fund was established in 1954 by the New Jersey Alumni Association 
in memory of Dr. Albert A. Harrington, a member of the Class of 1910. The 
fund is a source of valuable help in aiding students to solve their temporary 
financial problems. 

The E. Benton Taylor Scholarship 

One of the finest scholarships in the field of dental education, the E. 
Benton Taylor Scholarship was conceived and arranged by Mrs. Taylor and 
wall be perpetuated by the Luther B. Benton Company of Baltimore. It was 
put into operation in 1954 and will be awarded annually to a Maryland student 
of each entering class, who will continue to receive its benefits during the four 
years of his dental school course. 



M 20 



School of Dentistry 



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DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 
ANATOMY 

Professor: hahn (head of department). 

Associate Professor: Thompson. 

Assistant Professors: edmond g. vanden bosche, and piavis. 

DRS. JAGIELSKI, LINDENBERG, LOVEMAN, AND SACHS. 

Anat. 111. Human Gross Anatomy. (8) 

First year. This course consists of dissection and lectures, supplemented by frequent 
conferences and practical demonstrations. The entire human body is dissected. The 
subject is taught with the purpose of emphasizing the principles of the body structure, 
the knowledge of which is derived from a study of its organs and tissues, and the 
action of its parts. Arrangements can be made to accommodate qualified students 
and dentists interested in research or in making special dissections or topographical 
studies. 

Anat. 112. Human Neuroanatomy. (2) 

First year. Second semester. Prerequisite, Anatomy 111 or equivalent. Neuro- 
anatomy is offered in the Freshman year following Gross Anatomy. The work con- 
sists of a study of the whole brain and spinal cord by gross dissections and micro- 
scopic methods. Correlation is made, whenever possible, with the student's work 
in the histology and physiology of the central nervous system. 

Anat. 113. Comparative Tooth Morphology. Q) 

First year. Second semester. The course treats the evolutionary development of 
dentition as a necessary factor in the study of human oral anatomy. It includes a 
comparative study of the teeth of the animal kingdom, with a comparative study 
of the number, position and form of the teeth. 

Anat. 114. Tooth Morphology. (3) 

First year. Second semester. This course is designed to teach the form and functions 
and the relationships of the teeth, and includes a study of the nomenclature of sur- 
faces, divisions and relations of the teeth. In the laboratory the student is trained 
in the carving of the various teeth and in the dissection of extracted teeth through 
their various dimensions. 

The second part of the course includes a study of the supporting structures of 
the teeth and of the relation of the teeth to these structures. The periods of begin- 
ning calcificaion, eruption, complete calcification, and shedding of the deciduous 
teeth; followed by the periods of beginning calcification, eruption, and complete 
calcification of the permanent teeth, are studied and correlated with the growth in 
size of the jaws and face. 

For Graduates 

Anat. 211. Human Gross Anatomy. (8) 

Same as course 111 but with additional work on a more advanced level. 

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University of Maryland 

Anat. 212. Human Neuroanatomy. (2) 

Same as course 112 but with additional instruction of a more advanced nature. 

Anat. 214. The Anatomy of the Head and Neck. (3) 

One conference and two laboratory periods per week for one semester. 

Anat. 216. Research. 

Credit determined by amount and quality of work performed. 

BIOCHEMISTRY 

Professor: vanden boschb (head of department). 

MR. MORRIS AND MR. LEONARD. 

Biochem. 111. Principles of Biochemistry. (6) 

First year. Prerequisites inorganic and organic chemistry, with additional training 
in quantitative and physical chemistry desirable. Two lectures and one laboratory 
period throughout the year. The chemistry of living matter forms the basis of the 
course. The detailed subject matter includes the chemistry of carbohydrates, fats, 
proteins, enzymes, vitamins, and hormones. The processes of respiration, digestion, 
metabolism, secretion and excretion are considered. Laboratory instruction in quali- 
tative and quantitative blood and urine examination is included. 

For Graduates 

Biochem. 211. Advanced Biochemistry. (6) 

Prerequisite Biochemistry 111. Two lectures, one conference and one laboratory 

period throughout the year. 

Biochem. 212. Research in Biochemistry. 
Prerequisite Biochemistry 211. 

DENTAL HISTORY AND LITERATURE 

Professor: Foley (head of department). 

Lit. 121. Oral and Written Communication. (2) 

Second year. A formal course of lectures is given in the second year. Many aspects 
of the instruction are given practical application in the third and fourth years. 
The course has many purposes, all of them contributing to the training of the students 
for effective participation in the extra-practice activities of the profession. Particular 
attention is given to instruction in the functioning of the agencies of communication 
in dentistry: the dental societies and the dental periodicals. The practical phases of 
the course include a thorough study of the preparation and uses of oral and written 
composition by the dental student and the dentist; the use of libraries; the com- 
pilation of bibliographies; the collection, the organization, and the use of information; 
the management of dental meetings; the oral presentation of papers; and professional 
correspondence . 

M 24 



School of Dentistry 

Lit. 141. Thesis. (2) 
Fourth year. 

Lit. 142. Dental History. (I) 

Fourth year. Second semester. Lectures in Dental History describe the beginnings of the 
art of dental practice among ancient civilizations, its advancement in relation to the de- 
velopment of the so-called medical sciences in the early civilizations, its struggle through 
the Middle Ages and, finally, its attainment of recognized professional status in modern 
times. Special attention is given to the forces and stresses that have brought about 
the evolutionary progress from a primitive dental art to a scientific health service 
profession. 

DENTAL PROSTHESIS 

A. Removable Complete and Partial Prosthesis 

Professor: g. w. gaver (head of department). 
Associate Professors: oggesen, ramsey and warner. 

DRS. GORDON, PRIMROSE, WATSON AND WRIGHT. 

Pros. Ilia. Dental Materials. (4) 

First year. This course is designed to provide the student with a scientific back- 
ground in the nomenclature, composition, physical properties, practical application, 
and proper manipulation of the important materials used in the practice of dentistry, 
excluding drugs and medicinals. 

The theoretical aspect of the course is presented in the form of lectures, demon- 
strations, informal group discussions, and directed supplemental reading. From 
the practical standpoint, the student manipulates and tests the various materials in 
the laboratory, being guided by prepared project sheets. The student develops an 
understanding of these factors: the importance of scientific testing of a material 
before it is used by the profession at large; the realization that every material has 
its limitations, which can be compensated for only by intelligent application and 
manipulation; and an appreciation of the vast field of research open to those who 
wish to improve the materials now available. 

Pros. 112a. introduction to Complete Denture Prosthesis. (I) 
First year. Second semester. This course is devoted to the manipulation of impression 
compound and the procedures used in developing impressions of edentulous arches, 
casts and bite plates. It embraces a series of lecture-demonstrations designed to give the 
student a knowledge of the essential fundamentals in complete denture construc- 
tion. 

Pros. 121a. Complete Denture Prosthesis. (2) 

Second year. This course is given by lecture-demonstrations on bite registration, tooth 

arrangement, and final finish of complete dentures. 

Pros. 131a. Basic Clinical Complete Denture Prosthesis. (5) 

Third year. The course includes a study of the practical application in the clinic of 

the fundamentals taught in the preceding years. Demonstrations of the various 

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University of Maryland 

technics of impression and bite taking are offered to provide the student with addi- 
tional knowledge necessary for clinic work. 

Pros, 133a. Introduction to Removable Partial Denture Prosthesis. (1) 
Third year. Second semester. This lecture-demonstration course embraces all phases 
of removable partial denture construction. Experiments and exercises are arranged 
to give the student the fundamentals in designing, casting and finishing partial den- 
tures. 

Pros. 141a. Advanced Clinical Denture Prosthesis. (4) 

Fourth year. This course consists of the clinical application of the fundamentals 

taught in the previous years. Particular attention is given to a standard method of 

denture construction to equip the student with a basic technic for use in private 

practice. 

B. Fixed Partial Prosthesis 

Professor: nuttall (head of department). 
Associate Professors: dosh, mc lean-lu and oggesen. 
Assistant Professor: willer. 

DRS. M. GRAHAM AND STEELE. 

Pros. 122b. Principles of Fixed Partial Prosthesis. (6) 

Second year. This lecture and laboratory course is designed to provide a background 
of fundamental knowledge in fixed partial denture prosthesis. The interrelations 
of the biological and mechanical aspects of dentistry are emphasized. The prin- 
ciples involved and the procedures used in abutment preparations, the construction 
of fundamental retainers and pontic sections, and the assemblage of fixed bridge 
restorations are presented in detail and correlated with the requirements of occlusion. 
In addition to these procedures, the technics include impressions, wax manipulation, 
pattern construction, investing and casting. 

Pros. 132b. Ceramic and Plastic Restorations. (2) 

Third year. First semester. This course presents the uses of porcelain and methyl 
methacrylate as restorative materials. Instruction is given in the procedures of 
preparation, impressions, color selection, temporary protection and cementation. These 
materials are employed in the construction of complete veneer crowns and dowel 
crowns and in staining and glazing technics. 

Pros. 134b. Basic Clinical Fixed Partial Prosthesis. (4) 

Third year. This is a comprehensive course in the essential requirements for the 
successful use of the fixed partial denture. Special consideration is given to funda- 
mental factors in diagnosis, treatment planning and clinical procedures. The course 
integrates biological factors, mechanical principles and esthetic requirements with 
restorative treatment. Emphasis is placed on the physiological considerations as a 
basis for fixed partial denture service. 

Pros. 142b. Advanced Clinical Fixed Partial Prosthesis. (3) 

Fourth year. This course provides clinical training and experience for the student. 

The acquired background of knowledge is utilized in rendering treatment services for 

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School of Dentistry 

patients. Experience is gained in assessing completely the dental problem, planning 
a practical treatment consistent with the total dental needs and providing services 
which satisfy the objectives of prevention, function and esthetics. 



DIAGNOSIS 

Professor: biddix (head of department). 
Associate Professors: w. l. graham and golton. 

DRS. BRYANT, LEBO AND WEISS. 

Diag. 131. Principles of Oral Diagnosis and Treatment Planning. (2) 
Third year. The fundamental principles and procedures in the diagnosis of oral 
and related diseases are studied by intimate clinical observation and discussion of 
interesting cases. The study of the oral cavity through an understanding of its 
relation to other parts of the body is emphasized. By means of consultations with 
other departments the procedures of a comprehensive diagnosis are developed and 
applied in treatment planning. 

Diag. 132. Seminar. 

Third year. The objective of this course is to teach the student to correlate clinical, 
roentgenologic and laboratory findings. Selected patients are presented by both 
medical and dental teachers. 

Diag. 141. Clinical Oral Diagnosis and Treatment Planning. (I) 
Fourth year. This course is a continuation of Diagnosis 131 and 132. 



HISTOLOGY 

Professor: provenza (acting head of department). 

DR. CHENG AND MR. JORDAN. 

Hist. 111. Mammalian Histology and Embryology. (8) 

First year. The course embraces the thorough study of the cells, tissues and organs 
of the various systems of the human body. Although certain aspects of the dental 
histology phase of the course are given strictly as special entities, many are in- 
cluded in the instruction in general histology, since the two areas are so intimately 
related when functional and clinical applications are considered. The instruction in 
embryology is correlated with that in histology. It covers the fundamentals of de- 
velopment of the human body, particular emphasis being given to the head and 
facial regions, the oral cavity, and the teeth and their adnexa. Specific correlations 
are also made with the other courses in the dental curriculum. 

For Graduates 

Hist. 212. Mammalian Histology and Embryology. (6) 

This course is the same as Histology 111, except that it does not include the dental 
phases of 111, but does include additional instruction and collateral reading of an 
advanced nature. 

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University of Maryland 

Hist. 213. Mammalian Oral Histology and Embryology. (2) 
Prerequisite, Histology 111 or 212, or an equivalent course. This course covers the 
dental aspects of Histology 111, and includes additional instruction in the relations 
of histologic structure and embryologic development of the teeth, their adnexa, and 
the head and facial regions of the human body. 

Hist. 214. Research in Histology. 
Number of hours and credit by arrangement. 

Hist. 215. Research in Embryology. 
Number of hours and credit by arrangement. 

MEDICINE 

A. General Medicine 
Associate Professor: mc lean. 

DRS. FRAVEL, LEONARD AND OGDEN. 

Med. 121a. First Aid. 

Second year. Second semester. In this course the student is instructed in the basic 

principles of first aid. 

Med. 132a. Principles of Medicine. (2) 

Third year. The course is taught by lectures, visual aids and x-ray demonstrations 
of diseases of the cardiorespiratory, gastrointestinal, genitourinary and nervous sys- 
tems. 

Med. 141a. Physical Diagnosis. (I) 

Fourth year. Second semester. Slides and clinical demonstrations are used to show 
the methods of recognition of important objective signs as they relate to body dis- 
turbances. The methods of taking blood pressure are also taught. 

Me d. 142a. Principles of Medicine. (2) 

Fourth year. Throughout the year the entire class is taken into the hospital for 
medical clinics where the close application of medical and dental knowledge in 
history taking, diagnosis, laboratory procedures and treatment is emphasized. 

Me d. 143a. Preventive and Public Health Dentistry. (I) 

Fourth year. Second semester. The objectives of this course are to emphasize those 
measures other than remedial operations that will tend to minimize the occurrence 
or the extension of oral disease, and to outline the status of dentistry in the field of 
general public health. The relations of dentistry with other phases of public health 
are discussed, as are the problems affecting the administration of dental health pro- 
grams. Special effort is made to demonstrate methods and materials suitable for use 
in dental health education programs. 

Med. 144a. Clinical Conferences. 

Fourth year. Throughout the year small groups of students are taken into the hos- 
pital for medical ward rounds, demonstrations and discussions. 

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School of Dentistry 



B. Oral Medicine 



Associate Professor: biddington. 
Assistant Professor: abramson. 

DRS. T. F. CLEMENT AND NORRIS. 

Med. 121b. Principles of Endodontics. CO 

Second year. The lecture phase presents the fundamentals necessary for endodontic 

procedures; the indications and contraindications for these procedures; the methods 

used in performing the necessary steps to preserve the functions of the teeth and to 

maintain the health of the individual. The laboratory phase is designed to teach the 

student the materials, the instrumentation, and the techniques employed in endodontic 

treatment. 

Med. 122b. Introduction to Periodontics, CO 

Second year. The lectures place special emphasis on the importance of oral hygiene 
and its relation to the prevention of all dental disorders. The causes, results, and 
treatment of unhygienic conditions of the oral cavity are fully considered. Demon- 
strations are given in the prophylactic treatment of the mouth and in the accepted 
-methods of tooth brushing to be used in home care. In the laboratory the student 
learns on special manikins the use of the periodontal instruments. By progressive 
exercises and drills he is taught the basic principles of good operating procedure and 
the methods of thorough prophylactic treatment. 

Med. 131b. Basic Clinical Endodontics. CO 

Third year. During the Junior year, the student applies the fundamentals he has 

learned by performing endodontic procedures on clinical cases. 

Med. 132b. Basic Clinical Periodontics. CO 

Third year. The lectures present the etiology, clinical symptoms, diagnosis, prognosis, 
and methods of treatment of the various forms of periodontal disease, other diseases 
of the oral cavity, and lesions of the lips, cheeks, and tongue. The recognition of 
periodontal disease in its incipient forms and the importance of early treatment are 
stressed. The lectures are well illustrated by color slides, moving pictures, and other 
visual aids. The Junior student is required to apply the fundamentals he has learned 
by performing periodontal procedures on a prescribed number of clinical cases. 

Med. 141b. Advanced Clinical Endodontics. CO 

Fourth year. During his Senior year the student performs the more advanced endodontic 

procedures on clinical cases. 

Med. 142b. Advanced Clinical Periodontics. CO 

Fourth year. The Senior student performs the periodontal procedures on clinical 

patients exhibiting the more advanced periodontal problems. 

MICROBIOLOGY 

Professor: shay Che ad of department). 

MR. TRAIL 

Microbiol. 121. Dental Microbiology and Immunology. (4) 

Second year. First semester. The course embraces lectures, laboratory, demonstra- 

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University of Maryland 

tions, recitations, and group conferences, augmented by guided reading. Practical and 
theoretical consideration is given to pathogenic bacteria, viruses, yeasts and molds. 
Special attention is given to those organisms which cause lesions in and about the 
oral cavity, particularly primary focal infections about the teeth, tonsils, etc., which 
result in the establishment of secondary foci. Immunological and serological prin- 
ciples are studied, with special consideration being given to hypersensitivity resulting 
from the use of antibiotics, vaccines, antigens, and other therapeutic agents. 

Laboratory teaching includes the methods of staining and the cultural charac- 
teristics of microorganisms; their reaction to disinfectants, antiseptics, and germicides; 
methods of sterilization and asepsis; animal inoculation; preparation of sera, vaccines, 
and antitoxins; a study of antibiotics; and a demonstration of virus techniques. In all 
phases of the course emphasis is placed on dental applications. 

For Graduates 

Microbiol 200, 201. Chemotherapy. (1-2) 

Prerequisite Microbiology 121 or equivalent. One lecture a week. Offered in alter- 
nate years. A study of the chemistry, toxicity, pharmacology and therapeutic value of 
drugs employed in the treatment of disease. 

Microbiol. 202, 203. Reagents and Media. (I, I) 

One lecture a week. Offered in alternate years. A study of the methods of prep- 
aration and use of bacteriological reagents and media. 

Microbiol. 210. Special Problems in Microbiology. 

Credit determined by amount and quality of work performed. Laboratory course. 

Microbiol. 211. Public Health. (1-2) 

Prerequisite Microbiology 121 or equivalent. Lectures and discussions on the or- 
ganization and administration of state and municipal health departments and private 
health agencies. The course also includes a study of laboratory methods. 

Microbiol. 221. Research in Microbiology. 

Credit determined by amount and quality of work performed. 



OPERATIVE DENTISTRY 

Professor: Medina (acting head of department). 

Associate Professor: louie. 

Assistant Professors: h. m. clement, c. gaver and edmond g. vanden bosche. 

DRS. BEAVEN, DIAZ, LEVIN AND NEILUND. 

Oyer. 121. Fundamentals of Operative Dentistry. (5) 

Second year. The student is trained in the technical procedures of cavity prepara- 
tion and the manipulation of the restorative materials employed in the treatment of 
diseases and injuries of the tooth structure. These basic principles are applied on 
composition teeth and extracted natural teeth. Instruction includes twenty-six lectures 
and forty-eight three-hour laboratory periods. 

M 30 



School of Dentistry 

Oper. 131. Basic Clinical Operative Dentistry. (4) 

Third year. This course is a continuing development of the fundamentals taught in 
Operative 121. The objective is to present the additional information which is 
necessary for the management of practical cases. Instruction includes lectures, 
demonstrations and clinical practice in which the student treats patients under the 
individual guidance of staff members. 

Oper. 141. Advanced Clinical Operative Dentistry. (6) 

Fourth year. With the background provided by Operative 121 and 131, the student 
is able to comprehend and apply the procedures for treating the more complicated 
operative problems. The objectives of this course are to instruct the student in the 
different procedures by which a comprehensive operative service can be rendered 
and to acquaint him with as many unusual clinical cases as possible. Instruction 
includes lectures, demonstrations, and clinical practice. 

ORTHODONTICS 

Professor: preis (head of department). 

Assistant Professors: kress, shehan and swinehart. 

DRS. CULLEN AND SCHAEFFER. 

Ortho. 131. Principles of Orthodontics. (2) 

Third year. The course consists of lectures supplemented by slides and motion pic- 
tures. The subject matter includes the history of orthodontics and the study of 
growth and development, evolution of human dental occlusion, forces of occlusion, 
etiology of malocclusion, aberrations of the maxilla and mandible which affect occlu- 
sion, and tissue changes incident to tooth movement. 

Ortho. 141. Clinical Orthodontics. (I) 

Fourth year. Students are assigned in small groups to the Clinic where patients are 
given a thorough dental examination. Under the direction of an instructor each case 
is diagnosed, methods of procedure are explained, and treatment planning is out- 
lined. In the more simple cases therapy is undertaken by the students under the 
supervision of an instructor. Students, therefore, have the opportunity of applying 
clinically the knowledge which they received during their Junior year. 

PATHOLOGY 

Professor: M. s. aisenberg (head of department). 
Associate Professor: Weinberg. 
Assistant Professor: a. d. aisenberg. 

DR. GRANRUTH. 

Path. 121. General Pathology. (4) 

Second year. Second semester. The general principles of disease processes and tissue 
reactions, both gross and microscopic, are taught with the objectives of training the 
student to recognize and be familiar with the abnormal and of creating a foundation 
for further study in the allied sciences. Emphasis is placed upon those diseases in 
the treatment of which medicodental relationships are to be encountered. 

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University of Maryland 

Path. 131. Oral Pathology. (3) 

Third year. First semester. The course includes a study of the etiology and the 
gross and microscopic manifestations of diseases of the teeth and their investing 
structures: pathologic dentition, dental anomalies, periodontal diseases, calcific de- 
posits, dental caries, pulpal diseases, dentoalveolar abscesses, oral manifestations of 
systemic diseases, cysts of the jaws, and benign and malignant lesions in and about 
the oral cavity. 

Path. 141. Seminar. 

Fourth year. This constitutes a part of the cancer teaching program sponsored by a 
grant from the United States Public Health Service. It is conducted by visiting lec- 
turers who are specialists in their respective fields. 

For Graduates 

Path. 211. Advanced Oral Pathology. (8) 

Tw© lectures and two laboratory periods throughout the year. This course is pre- 
sented with the objective of correlating a knowledge of histopathology with the 
various aspects of clinical practice. Studies of surgical and biopsy specimens are 
stressed. 

Path. 212. Research. 

Time and credit by arrangement. Research in areas of particular interest to the 
student. 

PEDODONTICS 

Associate Professor: sanders. 
Assistant Professor: ehrlich. 

DRS. BARTLETT AND KERCHEVAL. 

Ped. 121. Technics of Pedodontics. (I) 

Second year. Second semester. This laboratory course in dentistry for children 
consists of sixteen laboratory periods. Demonstrations and visual aids are utilized to 
augment the teaching procedure. The work is performed on model teeth in primary 
dentoforms and consists of exercises in cavity preparation in primary teeth for the 
proper reception of different restorative materials, in the technic of restoring a frac- 
tured young permanent anterior tooth, and in the construction of a basic type of 
space maintainer. 

Ped. 131. Clinical Pedodontics. (I) 

Third year. The student is introduced to clinical dentistry for children. He utilizes 
the technical procedures learned in the laboratory. Didactic instruction includes 
sixteen lectures offered during the first semester. Emphasis is given to the manage- 
ment of the child patient with necessary modifications for behavior problems. The 
indications and contraindications for pulpal therapy are evaluated for the purpose 
of rational tooth conservation. Oral hygiene, roentgenology, growth and develop- 
ment, and caries susceptibility tests are taught. Training in preventive orthodontics 
is given for true denture guidance and to allow the student to institute interceptive 
or early remedial measures in incipient deformities. 

«* 32 



School of Dentistry 

The Department endeavors to develop in the student a comprehensive interest 
in guiding the child patient through the period of the mixed dentition. A separate 
clinic, equipped with child-size chairs and supervised by the pedodontics staff, pro- 
vides adequate opportunity for clinical applications of the methods taught in labora- 
tory and lectures. 

Ped. 141. Clinical Pedodontics. (J) 

Fourth year. The student continues his clinical training throughout the year and is 

assigned the more difficult cases. 

PHARMACOLOGY 

Professor: dobbs (head of department). 
Assistant Professor: ross. 

DR. BRAGER. 

Pharmacol. 131. General Pharmacology and Therapeutics. (4) 
Third year. The course is designed to provide a general survey of pharmacology, 
affording the students the necessary knowledge for the practice of rational therapeutics. 
The course is taught by lectures, laboratory and demonstrations. The first semester con- 
sists of sixteen hours of didactic work including instruction in pharmaceutical chemis- 
try, pharmacy, prescription writing, and the pharmacodynamics of the local-acting 
drugs. The second semester consists of thirty-two hours of didactics and forty-eight 
hours of laboratory instruction. The laboratory experiments are performed by stu- 
dents on animals and are designed to demonstrate the direct effects of drugs on vital 
tissues. The subject material consists of the pharmacodynamics of the systemic- 
acting drugs and the anti-infective agents. In the therapeutics phase the students 
are instructed in the use of drugs for the prevention, treatment, and correction of 
general and oral diseases. 

Pharmacol. 141. Oral Therapeutics. (I) 

Fourth year. First semester. This course consists of sixteen hours of lectures and 
demonstrations. It is designed to acquaint the students with the practical applica- 
tions of pharmacology in the treatment of dental and oral diseases. Particular em- 
phasis is given to the newer drugs and the more recent advances in therapeutics. 
Patients from the dental clinics and the hospital are used for demonstrations whenever 
possible. A correlation of theory with clinical practice is obtained by chairside in- 
struction on patients in the dental clinic. 

Pharmacol. 142. Nutritional Therapeutics. (I) 

Fourth year. Second semester. This course consists of sixteen hours of lectures and 
demonstrations devoted to the principles and practices of nutritional therapeutics. 
The presentation includes a study of the dietary requirements of essential food sub- 
stances in health and disease. The vitamin and mineral deficiency states with their 
pathology and symptomatology are presented with suggestions for dietary and drug 
therapy. Metabolic diseases are discussed, and their effects on the nutritional states 
are considered. Students are taught to plan diets for patients with various nutritional 
problems, such as those resulting from loss of teeth, the use of new appliances, dental 
caries, stomatitis, cellulitis, osteomyelitis, and bone fractures. A project study is 
made by each student which includes analyses of his basal metabolic requirement, his 
total energy requirement, and his dietary intake in relation to his daily needs. 

33 ► 



University of Maryland 

PHYSIOLOGY 

Professor: oster (head of department). 
Associate Professors: shipley and pollack. 

MRS. STALING. 

Physiol. 121. Principles of Physiology. (6) 

Second year. A fundamental objective of this course is to achieve an integration of 

basic scientific phenomena of function as they relate to the organism as a whole. 

Lectures deal with the principal fields of physiology, including heart and circula- 
tion, peripheral and central nervous functions, respiration, digestion, muscular ac- 
tivity, hepatic and renal functions, water and electrolyte balance, special senses, gen- 
eral and cellular metabolism, endocrines and reproduction. In the laboratory work 
(first semester) the classic experiments on frog and turtle muscle and heart function 
are followed by more advanced work on rabbits, cats, dogs and the students them- 
selves. A special series of lectures is devoted to the application of basic physiologic 
principles to human clinical problems. 

For Graduates 

Physiol. 211. Principles of Mammalian Physiology. (6) 

Prerequisite permission from the department. Same as course 121 but with collateral 

reading and additional instruction. 

Physiol. 212. Advanced Physiology. 

Hours and credit by arrangement. Lectures and seminars during the second semes- 
ter. 

Physiol. 213. Research. 

Hours and credits by arrangement. 



PRACTICE ADMINISTRATION 

Professor: biddix. 

DR. LOVETT AND MR. o'DONNELL. 

Pract. Adm. 141. Principles of Administration. (I) 

Fourth year. Second semester. The objective of this course is to prepare students to 
assume the social, economic and professional responsibilities of dental practice. The 
lectures embrace the selection of the office location^and office equipment, the basis 
of determining fees, the methods of collecting accounts, the use of auxiliary personnel, 
and the choice of various types of insurance and investments. A comprehensive 
bookkeeping system for a dental office is explained. 

Pract. Adm. 142. Ethics. (1) 

Fourth year. First semester. The course includes lectures on general ethics and 
its basic teachings, and an interpretation of the philosophical principles adopted by 
the American Dental Association and embodied in its "Principles of Ethics." 

< 34 



School of Dentistry 

Pract. Adm. 143. Jurisprudence. (I) 

Fourth year. First semester. The objective of the course is to acquaint the dental 
student with the fundamentals of law as they relate to the dentist and to his patients. 
The sources of law, the types of courts and court procedures are explained; the 
student is acquainted with the special statutory provisions pertaining to the regula- 
tion of the practice of dentistry, as well as the dentist's responsibilities under the 
criminal law. The respective rights and liabilities of both the dentist and his patients 
are considered in lectures dealing with contracts and torts; practical illustrations of 
these rights and liabilities are reviewed in the light of actual reported cases in the 
courts. 

ROENTGENOLOGY 

Professor: biddix. 

DRS. KIEFMAN AND KLEIN. 

Roentgenol. 131. Principles of Dental Roentgenology. (2) 

Third year. The lectures include a study of the physical principles involved in the 
production of x-rays and a discussion of their properties and effects, the hazards of 
roentgenography to both operator and patient, the technics of taking roentgenograms, 
and the processing of the films. The conference periods deal with the roentgeno- 
graphic study of the normal anatomic structures in health and the variations noted 
under various pathologic conditions. 

Roentgenol. 132. Introduction to Clinical Dental Roentgenology. 
Third year. Second semester. The division of the class into small groups permits 
individual supervision in the clinical application of the material presented in Roent- 
genol. 131. Under guidance the student learns to correctly place, expose and process 
the film and mount a full series of dental roentgenograms. 

Roentgenol. 141. Clinical Dental Roentgenology. (I) 

Fourth year. Under a system of rotating assignments students are placed in constant 
association with the routine practical use of the roentgen ray. They are required to 
master the fundamental scientific principles and to acquire technical skill in taking, 
processing, and interpreting all types of intraoral and extraoral films. 

SURGERY 

Professors: dorsey (head of department), helrich, robtnson and yeager. 
Associate Professor: cappuccio. 
Assistant Professors: siwinski and inman. 

DRS. HINDS, HYNSON AND SCHNEIDER. 

Surg. 131. Anesthesiology. (2) 

Third year. Local anesthesia is taught in both principle and practice. In lectures 
and clinics all types of intraoral, extraoral, conduction and infiltration injections; 
the anatomical relation of muscles and nerves; the theory of action of anesthetic 
agents and their toxic manifestations are taught. Demonstrations are given in con- 
duction and infiltration technics; students give injections under supervision of an 

35 ► 



University of Maryland 

instructor. General anesthesia is taught in lectures and clinic demonstrations. The 
action of the anesthetic agents, methods of administration, indications and contra- 
indications, and the treatment of toxic manifestations are included. Demonstrations 
are given in the preparation of the patient, the administration of all general anes- 
thetics (inhalant, rectal, spinal, and intravenous), and the technics for oral opera- 
tions. Clinics are held in the Department of Oral Surgery in the Dental School and 
in the Hospital. 

Surg. 132. Oral Surgery. (3) 

Third year. The course consists of lectures on the principles of surgery, the classifica- 
tion of teeth for extraction, and the pre- and postoperative treatment of ambulatory 
patients. The student is assigned to the Department of Oral Surgery on a rotating 
schedule and is required to produce local anesthesia and extract teeth under the 
supervision of an instructor. 

Surg. 141. Oral Surgery. (3) 

Fourth year. This course consists of lectures, clinical assignments, and practical 
demonstrations on the etiology, pathology, diagnosis and treatment of all classes of 
tumors, infections, deformities, anomalies, impacted teeth, fractures and surgical 
problems associated with the practice of dentistry. Hospital clinics, demonstrations 
and ward rounds are given to familiarize the student with abnormal conditions inci- 
dent to the field of his future operations and to train him thoroughly in the diagnosis 
of benign and malignant tumors. Weekly seminars are held in the Hospital. Each 
student prepares and presents an oral surgery case report according to the require- 
ments of the American Board of Oral Surgery. 



For Graduates 

Surg. 201. Clinical Anesthesiology. (6) 
Forty hours a week for thirteen weeks. 

Surg. 220. General Dental Oral Surgery. (4) 

Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week for one semester. 

Surg. 221. Advanced Oral Surgery. (4) 

Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week for one semester. 

Swrg. 222. Research. 

Time and credit by arrangement. 

VISUAL AIDS IN TEACHING 

MR. TAYLOR AND STAFF. 

The Department of Visual Aids employs the latest photographic technics 
and equipment for the production of both monochromatic and full-color still 
and motion pictures. By cooperation with other departments new material is 
developed for lectures, clinics, publications and exhibits. 

< 36 



School of Dentistry 

Through photography the School retains for teaching purposes interesting 
cases that appear in the clinics, preserves evidence of unusual pathological 
cases, and records anatomical anomalies, facial disharmonies and malocclusions 
of the teeth. In addition the student, through his contact with photographic 
uses, becomes acquainted with the value of photography in clinical practice. 
Students are advised as to the use of visual aids in the preparation of lectures 
and theses, the arrangement and co-ordination of materials, and the organiza- 
tion and maintenance of records and histories. 

Various art media and the use of modern plastics supplement photography. 
By the combination and correlation of these methods all departments are pro- 
vided with an unlimited supply of valuable and often irreplaceable visual 
aids. 



SPECIAL COURSES 

Summer Courses 

As the need arises, summer courses may be offered in certain subjects in- 
cluded in the regular curriculum. A charge of $12.00 for each semester hour 
credit is made for these courses. 



■o 



The Gorgas Odontological Society 

The Gorgas Odontological Society was organized in 1916 as an honorary 
student dental society with scholarship as a basis for admission. The Society 
was named after Dr. Ferdinand J. S. Gorgas, a pioneer in dental education, a 
teacher of many years' experience, and during his life a great contributor to 
dental literature. It was with the idea of perpetuating his name that the 
Society adopted it. 

To be eligible for membership a student must be in the first 30 per cent of 
his class. The selection of this 30 per cent shall be based on the weighted 
percentage average system as outlined in the school regulations. The meetings, 
held once each month, are addressed by prominent dental and medical men, an 
effort being made to obtain speakers not connected with the University. The 
members have an opportunity, even while students, to hear men associated with 
other educational institutions. 

Omicron Kappa Upsilon 

Phi Chapter of Omicron Kappa Upsilon, honorary dental society, was char- 
tered at the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, University of 
Maryland during the session of 1928-29. Membership in the society is 
awarded to a number not exceeding 12 per cent of the graduating class. This 

37 ► 



University of Maryland 



honor is conferred upon students who through their professional course of 
study creditably fulfill all obligations as students, and whose conduct, earnest- 
ness, evidence of good character and high scholarship recommend them to 
election. 

The following graduates of the 1958 Class were elected to membership: 



Enrique Rafael Capo 
F. Lee Eggnatz 
Robert William Haroth 
Gerald Franklin Hoffman 
Lawrence Paul Jacobs 
Anthony Joseph Klein, Jr. 



Walter Prudden Leonard 
John Frank Lessig 
Richard Warren Moss 
John Sidney Rushton 
Lawrence Donald Sarubin 
Howard Stanton Spurrier 
Marvin Howard Tawes, Jr. 



Alumni Association 

The first annual meeting of the Society of the Alumni of the Baltimore 
College of Dental Surgery was held in Baltimore, March 1, 1849. This organi- 
zation has continued in existence to the present, its name having been changed 
to The National Alumni Association of the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, 
Dental School, University of Maryland. 

The officers of the Alumni Association for 1958-59 are as follows: 



President 

Edwin G. Gail 

3700 N. Charles Street 
Baltimore 18, Maryland 



President-Elect 

Harry W. Dressel, Jr. 

6340 Frederick Avenue 
Baltimore 28, Maryland 



Vice-President 

Saul M. Gale 

425 Clinton Place 

Newark 8, New Jersey 



Historian 

Milton B. Asbell 

25 Haddon Avenue 

Camden 3, New Jersey 



Secretary 

Joseph P. Cappuccio 

1010 St. Paul Street 

Baltimore 2, Maryland 



Treasurer 

Howard Van Natta 
Medical Arts Building 
Baltimore 1, Maryland 



Editor 

Kyrle W. Preis 

700 Cathedral Street 

Baltimore 1, Maryland 



^ 38 



School of Dentistry 

University Alumni Council Representatives 

Edwin G. Gail, 1959 Eugene D. Lyon, 1960 

Baltimore, Maryland Baltimore, Maryland 

Samuel H. Bryant, 1961 
Baltimore, Maryland 

Executive Council 

Irving Abramson, 1959 Calvin J. Gaver, 1960 

Baltimore, Maryland Catonsville, Maryland 

Philip L. Block, 1961 William B. Mehring, 1960 

Baltimore, Maryland Silver Spring, Maryland 

Melvin Hazen Colvin, 1961 Joseph M. Tighe, 1959 

Washington, D. C. Baltimore, Maryland 

Trustees Ex-Officio 

Edwin G. Gail, President 

Harry W. Dressel, Jr., President-Elect 

Joseph P. Cappuccio, Secretary 

Howard Van Natta, Treasurer 

Myron S. Aisenberg, Dean 

Elected Trustees 

Lewis C. Toomey, 1959 Frank N. Carroll, 1959 

Silver Spring, Maryland Wheeling, West Virginia 

Lawrence W. Bimestefer, 1960 Edward C. Morin, 1960 

Dundalk, Maryland Pawtucket, Rhode Island 

James W. McCarl, 1961 William Paul Hoffman, 1961 

Greenbelt, Maryland Washington, D. C. 

SENIOR PRIZE AWARDS 

The following prizes were awarded to members of the Senior Class for the 
1957-58 Session: 

The Alexander H. Pater son Memorial Medal 
For Practical Set of Full Upper and Lower Dentures 

HOWARD STANTON SPURRIER 

Honorable Mention Stanley Earle Block 

39 ► 



University of Maryland 

The Isaac H. Davis Memorial Medal 

(Contributed by Dr. Leonard I. Davis) 

For Cohesive Gold Filling 

PAUL HARVEY HYLAND 

Honorable Mention Lawrence Donald Sarubin 

The Alumni Association Medal 
For Thesis 

LAWRENCE DONALD SARUBIN 

and 
HOWARD STANTON SPURRIER 

Honorable Mention Harry Edward Brandau, Jr., David Allen Watson 

The Harry E. Kelsey Award 

(Contributed by former associates of Dr. Kelsey: 

Drs. Anderson, Devlin, Hodges, Johnston and Preis) 

For Professional Demeanor 

JOHN SIDNEY RUSHTON 

The Harry E. Latcham Memorial Medal 
For Complete Oral Operative Restoration 

JOHN FRANK LESSIG 

Honorable Mention Howard Stanton Spurrier 

The Edgar J. Jacques Memorial Award 
For Meritorious Work in Practical Oral Surgery 

RAYMOND DENNIS MENTON, JR. 

The Herbert Friedherg Memorial Award 

(Contributed by the New Jersey Alumni Chapter of the 

National Alumni Association) 

For Achievement hy a New Jersey Senior 

IRWIN B. SCHWARTZ 

The James P. McCormick Award 

For Meritorious Work in the Treatment of Traumatic 

Injuries of the Face and Jaws 

. ROBERT MATHIS JOHNSON 

The Alpha Omega Scholarship Award 
For Proficiency in the Course of Study 

HOWARD STANTON SPURRIER 

** 40 



School of Dentistry 

Graduating Class 
1957-1958 Session 

Ralph Richard Asadourian, B.A., University of New Hampshire, 

1954 New Hampshire 

Ronald James Bauerle, B.A., Providence College, 1954 Connecticut 

Carl Mitchell Baumann, University of Florida Florida 

Philip Stanley Benzil, B.S., University of Miami, 1954 Florida 

Thomas Henry Birney, B.A., University of Southern California, 1954 

California 

Stanley Earle Block, University of Maryland Maryland 

Joseph Paul Bodo, Jr., B.S., University of Tampa, 1954 Florida 

Stanley Saul Brager, B.S., University of Maryland, 1954 Maryland 

Harry Edward Brandau, Jr., University of Maryland Maryland 

Robert Sherman Brown, University of Pennsylvania New Jersey 

John Paul Burton, West Virginia University West Virginia 

Charles Wallis Buttner, University of Miami Florida 

Enrique Rafael Capo, Haverf ord College Puerto Rico 

Robert Ernest Chait, B.S., University of Miami Florida 

Virgil Lewis Chambers, Marshall College West Virginia 

George Elmore Collins, B.S., University of Maryland, 1956 Maryland 

Martin Richard Crytzer, B.S., University of Maryland, 1954 Pennsylvania 

Stanley Carl DelTufo, B.A., Rutgers University, 1954 New Jersey 

William Clinton Denison, West Virginia University West Virginia 

F. Lee Eggnatz, University of Florida Florida 

Melvin Feiler, Upsala College New Jersey 

Dayton Carroll Ford, Marshall College West Virginia 

Jose Antonio Fuentes, University of Puerto Rico Puerto Rico 

John W T illiam Gannon, Jr., A.B., West Virginia University, 1954. .West Virginia 

Richard Chris Georgiades, Virginia Military Institute Florida 

Robert Goren, B.S., University of Maryland, 1952 Maryland 

Barbara Lorraine Greco, A.B., The Newark Colleges of Rutgers 

University, 1954 New Jersey 

Anton Grobani, B.S., University of Maryland, 1954 Maryland 

Fernando Haddock, B.S., University of Puerto Rico, 1954 Puerto Rico 

Robert William Haroth, University of Maryland Maryland 

Barry Ronald Harris, University of Maryland Maryland 

Richard McFern Hemphill, A.B., West Virginia University, 1954. .West Virginia 
Gerald Franklin Hoffman, B.A., University of Connecticut, 1954. .Connecticut 

Paul Harvey Hyland, University of Delaware Delaware 

William Louis Hyman, University of Miami Florida 

Allen Burton Itkin, University of Connecticut Connecticut 

Lawrence Paul Jacobs, A.B., Temple University, 1954 Delaware 

Alfred Howard Jansen, Jr., University of Maryland Maryland 

Robert Mathis Johnson, B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1954. .Maryland 
Paul Franklin Kiefman, B.S., The American University, 1951 Virginia 

41 ► 



University of Maryland 

Robert Harmon McLloyd Killpack, B.A., University of Utah, 1954 Utah 

Anthony Joseph Klein, Jr., B.S., University of Cincinnati, 1954. . . .New York 

David Rodman Lecrone, University of Delaware Delaware 

Walter Prudden Leonard, Emory University Florida 

John Frank Lessig, B.S., University of Maryland, 1956 Maryland 

Herbert Gary Levin, University of Maryland Maryland 

Donald Palmer Lewis, Norwich University Massachusetts 

Benedict Salvatore LiPira, B.S., University of Maryland, 1954 Maryland 

Garrett Isaac Long, Jr., A.B., West Virginia University, 1954 Maryland 

Luis Felipe Lucca, B.S., University of Puerto Rico, 1948 Puerto Rico 

Albert Silveira Luiz, A.B., Boston University, 1952 Massachusetts 

Lawf ord Earle Magruder, Jr., University of Maryland Maryland 

Clyde Danforth Marlow, Emory University Florida 

Carlos Rafael Matos, B.S., University of Puerto Rico Puerto Rico 

Edward Robert McLaughlin, B.S., University of Massachusetts, 1954 

Massachusetts 

David Frederick Mehlisch, Graceland College Maryland 

Raymond Dennis Menton, Jr., B.S., Loyola College, 1954- Maryland 

Anthony Nicholas Micelotti, B.S., Boston College, 1952 Massachusetts 

Paul Masashi Morita, University of Maryland New Jersey 

Richard Warren Moss, Emory University Florida 

James Edward Nadeau, American International College Massachusetts 

William Harold Neilund, B.S., University of Maryland, 1951 Maryland 

Philip Patrick Nolan, B.S., Loyola College, 1953 Maryland 

Ralph Fields Norwood, Jr., Bethany College West Virginia 

Guy Sullivan O'Brien, Jr., B.S., Furman University, 1954 South Carolina 

Charles Irving Osman, B.S., University of Florida, 1954 Florida 

Warren Andrew Parker, Mount Saint Mary's College New Jersey 

Bienvenido Perez, Jr., B.S., University of Puerto Rico, 1954 New York 

Joseph Marion Powell, Furman University South Carolina 

Ralph Weyman Price, North Georgia College Virginia 

Alan Shia Resnek, Tufts College Massachusetts 

Henry Edward Richter, Jr., B.S., University of Maryland, 1954 Virginia 

Peter Arthur Rubelman, Emory University Florida 

John Sidney Rushton, University of Maryland Virginia 

Robert Nicholas Santangelo, Purdue University New Jersey 

Lawrence Donald Sarubin, B.S., University of Maryland, 1949 Maryland 

James Augustus Schaefer, B.S., St. Michael's College, 1954 New York 

Leonard Stanley Schneider, The Johns Hopkins University Maryland 

Howard Schwartz, B.A., Rutgers University, 1954 New Jersey 

Irwin Bernard Schwartz, The Newark Colleges of Rutgers University 

New Jersey 

David Howard Shamer, B.S., University of Maryland, 1951 Maryland 

Charles Irvine Shelton, B.S., West Virginia University West Virginia 

Cyril Stanton Sokale, B.A., The University of Connecticut, 1954. .Connecticut 
Edward William Spinelli, Jr., A.B., Tufts College, 1954 Massachusetts 

< 42 



School of Dentistry 

Howard Stanton Spurrier, University of Utah Utah 

John Francis Spychalski, B.S., St. Bernardine of Siena College, 1952. . .New York 

Ivan Lee Starr, A.B., Syracuse University, 1954 New Jersey 

Ronald Martin Starr, University of Maryland Maryland 

Elizabeth Lee Stewart, The Johns Hopkins University Maryland 

Marvin Howard Tawes, Jr., B.S., University of Maryland, 1956 Maryland 

Linn Shecut Tompkins, Jr., University of South Carolina South Carolina 

Frank Trotto, Jr., A.B., West Virginia University, 1953 West Virginia 

Donald Herbert Wadsworth, Emory University Florida 

William James Washuta, University of Miami Florida 

David Allen Watson, B.S., University of Maryland, 1956 Maryland 

Louis Weiss, University of Maryland Maryland 

William Alvin Wolf, A.B., Upsala College, 1951 Connecticut 

Rodger August Zelles, B.S., Rutgers University, 1954 New Jersey 

Honors 

Summa Cum Laude 
Howard Stanton Spurrier 

Magna Cum Laude 

Lawrence Donald Sarubin Anthony Joseph Klein, Jr. 

Robert William Haroth Gerald Franklin Hoffman 

Walter Prudden Leonard 

Cum Laude 

Lawrence Paul Jacobs John Frank Lessig 

Richard Warren Moss Marvin Howard Tawes, Jr. 

John Sidney Rushton F. Lee Eggnatz 

Enrique Rafael Capo 

Degree Conferred August 1, 1958 
George Louis Plassnig, University of Maryland Maryland 

Senior Class 

Kenneth David Bass, B.A., University of Connecticut, 1953; 

M.S., 1955 Connecticut 

Robert Gene Beckelheimer, Concord College West Virginia 

Frederick Blumenthal, University of Miami Florida 

Leonard Francis Borges, B.S., Tufts College, 1951 Massachusetts 

Martin David Breckstein, University of Florida Florida 

Lawrence Austin Brehne, B.A., Rutgers University, 1951 New Jersey 

43 ► 



University of Maryland 

Robert Francis Bristol, B.A., Providence College, 1955 Rhode Island 

John C. L. Brown, Jr., B.S., The Pennsylvania State University, 1952 

Pennsylvania 

Bayard Allen Buchen, Emory University Florida 

Robert Rolland Buckner, Washington Missionary College Georgia 

Barbara Dorothea Bucko, B.A., Syracuse University Connecticut 

Thomas Cali, B.S., University of Maryland, 1955 New Jersey 

John Joseph Cartisano, Indiana University New York 

Gary Herbert Cohen, University of Maryland Maryland 

Robert Ted Conner, West Virginia University West Virginia 

Juan Anibal Cuevas-Jimenez, B.S., University of Puerto Rico, 1953 

Puerto Rico 

Adolph Albert Cura, B.A., Boston College, 1955 Massachusetts 

Peter Bernard DalPozzol, Colby College Connecticut 

Allan Lee Danoff, University of Maryland, B.S., 1957 Maryland 

Eugene Frederick deLonge, Newberry College South Carolina 

Joseph Budding Dietz, Jr., Lehigh University Delaware 

Frank Anthony Dolle, B.S., University of Maryland, 1948; M.S., 

1950; Ph.D., 1954 Maryland 

William Frank Dombrowski, B.S., United States Naval Academy, 1950 

Maryland 
James Francis Dooley, B.S., United States Merchant Marine Academy, 

1950; A.B., Rutgers University, 1951 New Jersey 

William Edward Dowden, B.S., Niagara University, 1955 New York 

Conrad Castenzio Ferlita, B.S., University of Miami Florida 

Raymond Alan Flanders, Colgate University New York 

John Morrison Foley, B.S., Loyola College, 1955 Maryland 

James Arthur Fowler, Jr., University of Maryland, B.S., 1957 Maryland 

Robert Donald Fraser, B.S., Niagara University, 1955 New York 

Richard Lawrence Fraze, Tufts College Florida 

Larry Joe Frick, The Clemson Agricultural College South Carolina 

Thornwell Jacobs Frick, B.S., Davidson College, 1955 South Carolina 

Orton Dittmar Frisbie, University of Florida Florida 

Ivan Orlo Gardner, B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1952 Maryland 

Billy Wade Gaskill, West Virginia University Arkansas 

Gorm Pultz Hansen, University of Maryland, B.S., 1957 Maryland 

Frederick Lewis Hodous, University of Maryland Maryland 

Francis Kurt Hugelmeyer, B.S., College of the Holy Cross, 1955. . . .New York 

Eugene Farley Humphreys, Brigham Young University Idaho 

James Paul Jabbour, B.S., Tufts College, 1950; Ed.M., 1951 Massachusetts 

Calvin Charles Kay, University of Miami Florida 

Edward Gerard Keen, St. Anselm's College Connecticut 

Paul Lewis Keener, University of Maryland Maryland 

Joseph Krall, B.S., University of Maryland, 1948 Maryland 

Jacob Ian Krampf, University of Maryland, B.S., 1957 Maryland 

Frank Walter Krause, B.A., University of Virginia, 1955 New Jersey 

** 44 



School sf Dentistry 

Domenic Edward LaPorta, University of Maryland, B.S., 1957 Connecticut 

Richard John Lauttman, B.S., Loyola College, 1953 Maryland 

Robert Louis Lee, University of Maryland Maryland 

Wallace George Lee, University of Maryland, B.S., 1953 Michigan 

Lester Leonard Levin, University of Maryland Maryland 

Robert Bernard Lewis, B.S., College of the Lloly Cross, 1954 Rhode Island 

Leslie Herminio Lopez- Velez, B.S., University of Puerto Rico, 1955 

Puerto Rico 

Joseph Paul Lynch, B.S., Seton Hall University, 1953 New Jersey 

Carlos A. Machuca-Padin, B.S., University of Puerto Rico, 1954. . . .Puerto Rico 

Arnold Irwin Malhmood, LIniversity of Maryland, B.S., 1959 Maryland 

Jose Manuel Martinez, B.S., University of Puerto Rico, 1955 Puerto Rico 

John Kenneth McDonald, Louisiana State LIniversity and Agricultural 

and Mechanical College Mississippi 

Thomas James Meakem, Davis and Elkins College New Jersey 

Thomas Eugene Miller, B.S., St. John's University, 1955 New Jersey 

Bernard Lee Morgan, B.A., West Virginia University, 1955.... West Virginia 

Fabian Morgan, B.S., Wake Forest College, 1954 North Carolina 

John Worthington Myers, B.S., University of Maryland, 1957 Maryland 

Elizabeth Haydee Noa, B.A., Nazareth College, 1954 Puerto Rico 

William Barnard O'Connor, West Virginia University West Virginia 

William Robert Owens, B.S., Davidson College, 1954 North Carolina 

William Edward Parker, University of Maryland Maryland 

Jeffry Chandler Pennington, The Citadel South Carolina 

Charles Kenneth Peters, Jr., B.S., Loyola College, 1954 Maryland 

Gregory Michael Petrakis, B.S., Trinity College, 1955 Connecticut 

George Jackson Phillips, Jr., B.A., Amherst College, 1955 Maryland 

Barry Pickus, B.A., Western Maryland College, 1955 Maryland 

Donald Alan Pirie, B.S., University of Maryland, 1955 Maryland 

Anthony Michael Policastro, B.A., Seton Hall University, 1955. . . .New Jersey 

Joseph Eul Polino, B.A., Providence College, 1955 Connecticut 

Alben R. Pollack, B.A., Alfred LIniversity, 1955 New York 

Joel Pollack, B.S., The City College of New York, 1955 New York 

Albert Edward Postal, University of Maryland District of Columbia 

William Lewis Pralley, B.A., West Virginia LIniversity, 1955. ..West Virginia 

John Viering Raese, West Virginia University West Virginia 

William Paul Raimond, University of Maryland Maryland 

Burton Alvin Raphael, B.S., University of Maryland Maryland 

Harold Reuben Ribakow, University of Maryland Maryland 

Chester James Richmond, Jr., Tufts College Connecticut 

Matthew Angelo Rocco, B.A., Seton Hall University, 1955 New Jersey 

Lawrence David Rogers, University of Maryland, B.S., 1957 Maryland 

Everett Newton Roush, III, Marshall College West Virginia 

Louis Joseph Ruland, Jr., B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1955 

Maryland 
Pvaymond Richard Sahley, Marshall College West Virginia 

45 ► 



University of Maryland 

Charles Salerno, Upsala College New Jersey 

Piichard Charles Saville, B.A., University of Maryland, 1955 Maryland 

David Lee Schofield, University of Miami Florida 

Jerome Schwartz, B.S., University of Maryland, 1949 Maryland 

Piobert Bernard Silberstein, University of Florida Florida 

Stanley Leonard Silver, B.S., University of Maryland, 1953 

District of Columbia 

Francis Vincent Simansky, B.S., Loyola College, 1955 Maryland 

Orlando Louis Skaff, B.A., West Virginia University, 1955 West Virginia 

Philip Smith, University of Vermont and State Agricultural College. .Vermont 

Anthony Sollazzo, Rutgers University New Jersey 

James Frederick Sproul, West Virginia University Ohio 

John Joseph Stecher, B.S., Seton Hall University, 1952 New Jersey 

Donald Dietrich Stegman, B.S., University of Maryland, 1952 Maryland 

Daniel Joseph Sullivan, B.A., Providence College, 1955 Rhode Island 

Charles Carroll Swoope, Jr., University of Florida New Jersey 

Arthur Morton Tilles, University of Maryland Maryland 

John Louis Varanelli, University of Connecticut Connecticut 

Francis Anthony Veltre, B.S., University of Maryland, 1952; 

M.S., 1954 Maryland 

Jorge Vendrell, Tulane University of Louisiana Puerto Rico 

James Ray Wampler, Richmond College, University of Richmond Virginia 

Leonard Clifford Warner, Jr., Colby College Connecticut 

Edgar Clair White, Marshall College Kentucky 

Thomas Adams Wilson, B.A., Amherst College, 1955 Maryland 

Herbert Sanford Yampolsky, B.S., University of Alabama, 1955. . . .New Jersey 

junior Class 

Joel Martin Adler, Emory University Mississippi 

Earl Robert Alban, Jr., B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1954. . .Maryland 

John Jacob Atchinson, Marshall College West Virginia 

Edmund Donald Baron, Rutgers University New Jersey 

Hulon Edward Beasley, University of Florida Maryland 

John William Biehn, University of Maryland Maryland 

Raymond Cline Bodley, West Virginia University West Virginia 

William Francis Brady, Jr., B.S., Boston College, 1954; M.S., 

University of Massachusetts, 1956 Massachusetts 

Frank Lee Bragg, West Virginia University West Virginia 

James Peter Brown, B.A., American International College, 1956. .Massachusetts 

Rolla Ray Burk, Jr., A.B., West Virginia University, 1951 West Virginia 

Gene Edward Camp, West Virginia University West Virginia 

Alfred Chesler, Furman University Ohio 

Piobert Roy Chesney, Western Maryland College Maryland 

Robert A. Cialone, B.S., University of Maryland, 1955 New Jersey 

William John Cimikoski, A.B., University of Michigan, 1953. .. .Connecticut 

< 46 



School of Dentistry 

Milton Chipman Clegg, B.A., University of Utah, 1956 Utah 

Clyde Albert Coe, University of Maryland Maryland 

Blanca Collazo, B.S., University of Puerto Rico, 1956 Puerto Rico 

Frank Lateau Collins, West Virginia University West Virginia 

Myron Harris Coulton, University of Florida Florida 

Thomas Joseph Cronin, B.S., De Paul University, 1955 New Jersey 

William Walter Cwiek, B.S., University of Maryland, 1953 Maryland 

Charles Albert Darby, University of Maryland Maryland 

Charles Albert Dean, B.A., Providence College, 1956 Massachusetts 

John Jay Denson, Jr., B.S., University of Florida, 1956 Florida 

Michael Vincent Doran, Jr., B.S., University of Miami, 1956 Virginia 

Raymond Dzoba, Bowling Green State University New Jersey 

Morton Mayer Ehudin, University of Maryland, B.S., 1957 Maryland 

Joseph Thomas Fay, B.A., Providence College, 1956 Rhode Island 

Humbert Michael Fiskio, A.B., Oberlin College, 1955; M.A., 

University of Connecticut, 1956 Connecticut 

Henry Paul Fox, St. Michael's College New York 

Irwood Fox, B.A., University of Virginia, 1956 Virginia 

Joseph Giardina, University of Maryland, B.S., 1957 Maryland 

Harry Gruen, University of Miami Florida 

Ernest Lee Harris, Jr., Southern Missionary College Florida 

David William Heese, B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1953. . . .Maryland 

Sanford Sonny Hochman, University of Maryland, B.S., 1957 Maryland 

Edward Allen Hurdle, Jr., B.S., Loyola College, 1956 Maryland 

Clemuel Mansey Johnson, B.A., The University of North Carolina, 1953 

North Carolina 

Nicholas Irving Jones, B.S., The Citadel, 1956 South Carolina 

Norman Lewis Jones, Marshall College West Virginia 

Alan Donald Jung, B.S., University of Maryland, 1952 Maryland 

Don Samuel Killpack, B.S., University of Utah, 1951 Utah 

Irwin Kolikoff, B.S., Florida Southern College, 1953 New Hampshire 

Don Lee Koubek, A.B., West Virginia University, 1955 West Virginia 

Robert Marvin Kriegsman, A.B., The University of North Carolina 

North Carolina 
Scot Sueki Kubota, A.B., Colorado State College, 1953; 

A.M., 1954 Hawaii 

Nicolas Lasijczuk, D.S., University of Nancy New York 

Martin Albert Levin, University of Maryland, B.S., 1957 Maryland 

Marvin Paul Levin, University of Maryland, B.S., 1957 Maryland 

Harry Levy, University of Maryland Maryland 

William Lee Lovern, Concord College West Virginia 

Frederick Magaziner, B.S., University of Maryland, 1954 Maryland 

Martin Magaziner, University of Maryland District of Columbia 

Frank William Mastrola, Jr., B.A., Providence College, 1956. . . .Rhode Island 

Martin Lee Mays, B.S., Wofford College, 1957 South Carolina 

David Henry McLane, A.B., Marshall College, 1957 West Virginia 

47 > 



University of Maryland 

John Stephen McLaughlin, West Virginia University Maryland 

John Bennett Moore, Jr., Weber College Utah 

Richard Franklin Murphy, West Virginia University West Virginia 

Theodore Jacob Noffsinger, Jr., B.A., University of Maryland, 1956. .Maryland 
Franklin Lewis Oliverio, B.S., West Virginia University, 1956. . .West Virginia 

Billy Wendel Olsen, B.A., University of California, 1955 California 

Bernard John Orlowski, Seton Hall University New Jersey 

Philip Kibbee Parsons, West Virginia University West Virginia 

Helmer Eugene Pearson, Upsala College New Jersey 

Alfred John Phillips, University of Florida Florida 

James Vincent Picone, B.S., College of the Holy Cross, 1956. ..Massachusetts 

Robert Henry Prindle, B.A., St. Michael's College, 1956 New York 

Anthony Joseph Regine, B.S., Tufts College, 1955 Rhode Island 

Jude Philip Restivo, B.S., University of Maryland, 1956 Maryland 

Ronald Lee Ripley, A.B., West Virginia University, 1955 West Virginia 

Malcolm Louis Rosenbloum, Emory University Missouri 

Georges Philippe Raynald Roy, A.B., St. Michael's College, 1956 Maine 

William Joseph Rumberger, Mount Saint Mary's College Pennsylvania 

Thomas Melvin Rutherford, B.S., West Virginia Wesleyan College, 1956 

West Virginia 

Frank John Salino, The University of Buffalo New York 

Lawrence Francis Schaefer, St. Michael's College New York 

Roger Clare Sears, University of Maryland, B.S., 1958 Maryland 

Howard Irwin Segal, University of Miami Florida 

Edwin Barry Shiller, Emory University Florida 

Joseph James Smith, Mount Saint Mary's College New York 

Robert Carroll Smith, A.B., West Virginia University, 1956 West Virginia 

Alvin Jerome Snyder, B.S., University of Maryland, 1956 Maryland 

David M. Solomon, B.S., Fordham University, 1956 New Jersey 

Piudolph Clement Strambi, B.S., Fordham University, 1952 New Jersey 

Wayne Eugene Stroud, University of Maryland Illinois 

George Webster Struthers, Jr., B.S., Randolph-Macon College, 1952 

West Virginia 

Edward Ralph Thompson, Temple University New Jersey 

Robert Speirs Thomson, B.A., Houghton College, 1956 New Jersey 

Earle Alexander Tompkins, Jr., B.S., University of Massachusetts, 1955 

Massachusetts 

Gilbert Allen Vitek, Graceland College Maryland 

Raymond Francis Waldron, A.B., Boston College, 1956 Massachusetts 

Martin Truett Watson, A.B., Emory University, 1954 Georgia 

Irwin Robert Weiner, University of Akron Ohio 

Wayne Clark Wills, West Virginia University West Virginia 

Charles Rosser Wilson, B.S., Wake Forest College, 1956 North Carolina 

Dale Lee Wood, Western Maryland College Maryland 

Louis Yarid. A.B., Columbia University, 1956 Massachusetts 



<3 48 



School of Dentistry 

Sophomore Class 

Paul Wilfred Achin, Providence College Massachusetts 

Morris Antonelli, University of Maryland, B.S., 1958 District of Columbia 

Gilbert Samuel Berman, B.S., University of Maryland, 1957 Maryland 

Cecil Samuel Boland, B.S., Newberry College, 1957 Maryland 

Lester Malcolm Breen, Emory University Georgia 

Jay Ronald Brenner, University of Miami Florida 

Donald Acker Michael Brown, B.A., St. John's College, 1951 Maryland 

Douglas Adams Bryans, B.S., Springfield College, i957 Massachusetts 

George Franklin Buchness, B.S., Loyola College, 1948; M.S., Catholic 

University, 1954 Maryland 

Richard Mario Carmosino, A.B., Boston University, 1957 Massachusetts 

Thomas J. Cavanaugh, B.S., University of Maryland, 1957 Maryland 

Lawrence Leo Clark, Mount Saint Mary's College New Jersey 

James Richard Crouse, Shepherd College Maryland 

Billy Hugh Darke, B.S., Western Kentucky State College, 1954 Kentucky 

William Lawrence Doheny, Jr., University of Maryland Connecticut 

Edward Cornelius Dohertv, B.A., Boston College, 1957 Massachusetts 

Marlin Duane Dunker, B.A., Walla Walla College, 1955 California 

William Duane Fitzgerald, University of Massachusetts Massachusetts 

Sheldon Donald Fliss, University of Maryland Maryland 

Richard Arnold Foer. B.S., University of Maryland, 1957. . .District of Columbia 

Joseph Edward Furtado, B.A., Providence College, 1954 Rhode Island 

William Joseph Girotti, B.A., American International College, 1957 

Massachusetts 
Raymond Emil Goepfrich, B.S., Franklin and Marshall College, 1957 

Pennsylvania 
John George Goettee, Jr., B.A., Western Maryland College, 1957. . .Maryland 

Melvin Goldenberg, B.A., Providence College, 1957 Rhode Island 

Aaron Rufus Griffith, Jr., University of South Carolina South Carolina 

Sheldon Gerald Gross, University of Vermont Massachusetts 

Stanford Edgar Hamburger, B.A., University of Maryland, 1957. ... Maryland 

Arnold Hecht, University of Miami Florida 

Ronald Wesley Higel, University of Florida Florida 

William Paul Hoffman, Jr., Earlham College District of Columbia 

Patrick Francis Iacovelli, Jr., B.S., Boston College, 1952 Massachusetts 

Ronald Harold Israel, University of Maryland, B.S., 1958 Maryland 

Alvin Wesley Kagey, B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1957 Maryland 

Sanford Katsumi Kamezawa, LIniversity of California Hawaii 

Stanley Paul Kaminski, B.A., Seton Hall University, 1957 New Jersey 

Douglas Kaplan, B.A., Alfred University, 1957 New Jersey 

George Theodore Keary, Yale University Massachusetts 

Michael Edward Kolakowski, Jr., B.S., University of Maryland, 1957 

Maryland 
Robert George Kovack, B.S., Albright College, 1957 New Jersey 



49 



University of Maryland 

Ralph Leonard Kroopnick, B.A., University of Connecticut, 1957. .Connecticut 

William Herbert Lackey, Concord College West Virginia 

Robert Maurice Lattanzi, Albertus Magnus College Connecticut 

Jack Edward Liller, University of Richmond Maryland 

Arnold Irvin Loew, University of Miami Florida 

Sol Benjamin Love, Georgetown University District of Columbia 

Keith Gerald Lown, A.B., Fresno State College, 1956 California 

Edward Salters McCallum, Newberry College South Carolina 

William Edward McLaughlin, Mount Saint Mary's College New York 

Joseph Robert Marchesani, LaSalle College New Jersey 

Richard Madison Marrone, B.S., University of Maryland, 1957 Maryland 

Alan J. Martin, Ohio University ■ Florida 

Robert Cameron Mason, University of Maryland, B.S., 1958 Maryland 

Michael Charles Matzkin, B.A., Dartmouth College, 1957 Connecticut 

Robert Francis Meier, Mount Saint Mary's College New York 

Marc Julian Meyers, B.A., Western Maryland College, 1957 Maryland 

Ronald Britton Morley, B.A., Maryville College, 1957 New York 

Clarence John Myatt, A.B., St. Michael's College, 1957 Massachusetts 

Roy Mitsuaki Naito, B.A., University of Hawaii, 1956 Hawaii 

Antone Travers Oliveira, Jr., B.S., Tufts College, 1957 Massachusetts 

James Edward Palmer, University of Maryland Maryland 

David Bertram Pere, University of Miami Florida 

Albert Perlmutter, A.B., Boston University, 1957 Massachusetts 

Garr Thomas Phelps, Xavier University Kentucky 

Joseph Michael Pistoria, Seton Hall University New Jersey 

Erwin Stuart Raffel, B.S., University of Maryland, 1956 Maryland 

Malcolm Sidney Renbaum, B.S., Johns Hopkins University, 1956 . . . .Maryland 

John Filmore Robinson, Loyola College Maryland 

William Otis Rockefeller, University of Maryland New York 

Theodore Almada Rosa, University of Maryland, B.S., 1958 

District of Columbia 
Victor Angel Rosado, B.A., Polytechnic Institute of Puerto Rico, 1957 

Puerto Rico 

David Neuman Rudo, B.S., University of Maryland, 1957 Maryland 

Peter Paul Ryiz, University of Maryland, B.S., 1958 Connecticut 

Richard Daniel Sachs, University of Miami Florida 

Hershel Garvin Sawyer, A.B., Berea College, 1957 West Virginia 

Harold Mark Shavell, B.S., University of Illinois, 1957 Florida 

Robert Stanley Siegel, University of Maryland, B.S., 1958 Maryland 

Frank Joseph Sinnreich, Jr., B.S., University of Maryland, 1951 Maryland 

Melvin Jordan Slan, University of Maryland Maryland 

Louis Edward Snyder, Jr., University of Maryland .South Carolina 

James Miller Steig, Georgia Institute of Technology Florida 

Stanley Merrill Stoller, University of Maryland, B.S., 1958 Maryland 

Arthur Hein Streeter, B.S., Washington College, 1957 Maryland 

Joseph Ashley Sullivan, University of Miami Florida 

^ 50 



School of Dentistry 

Brett Taylor Summey, B.A., University of North Carolina, 1957 

North Carolina 

John Harvey Swann, B.S., University of Maryland, 1956 Maryland 

Jerry Dale Taf t, University of Maryland Montana 

Bill Edward Taylor, University of Oklahoma Oklahoma 

Paul Irvin Teitelbaum, University of Maryland, B.S., 1958 Maryland 

Donald Mathews Tilghman, University of Maryland, B.S., 1958 Maryland 

George Bartholomew Towson, Washington College Maryland 

Norton Allen Tucker, University of Maryland, B.S., 1958 Maryland 

Nils Glick Wallen, B.A., Syracuse University, 1957 New Jersey 

Frederic James Wasserman, B.S., University of Florida, 1957 Florida 

Alfred Stewart Windeler, Jr., Johns Hopkins University New Jersey 

William Herbert Witherspoon, West Virginia University Pennsylvania 

Larry Emanuel Wynne, Emory University Florida 

Stanley Leonard Zakarin, University of Florida Florida 

John Francis Zulaski, B.A., American International College, 1957. . .Connecticut 

Freshman Class 

Frederick Bradshaw Abbott, Southeast Missouri State College Maryland 

Tulio Fulvio Albertini, University of Maryland Maryland 

James Emil Andrews, B.S., Wake Forest College, 1958 North Carolina 

Robert Apfel, B.A., University of Miami, 1958 Florida 

Marvin Bennet Apter, University of Maryland Maryland 

Joseph Herman Axelrod, University of Maryland Maryland 

Michael Alan Balenson, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

Donald Harry Barnes, College of the Pacific California 

Howard Benjamin Berman, Emory University Florida 

Samuel Blum, University of Maryland District of Columbia 

Gabriel Herman Blumenthal, University of Miami Florida 

William John Bowen, B.S., University of Maryland, 1957 Maryland 

Roger Lee Brown, University of Maryland Pennsylvania 

Peter John Buchetto, Jr., University of Connecticut Connecticut 

Barry Stanley Buchman, University of Maryland Maryland 

Paul William Bushman, B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1958. . .Maryland 

Robert Moore Charlton, University of Maryland Maryland 

Jerome Milton Chertkoff, B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1958. .Maryland 

George Gary Clendenin, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

Hillard Wilf Cohen, University of Maryland Maryland 

David Constantinos, B.A., American International College, 1957. .Massachusetts 

William Howard Dickson, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

Albert William Doetzer, B.S., Loyola College, 1958 Maryland 

Irvin I. Donick, University of Maryland Maryland 

Richard Farish Downes, Jr., B.S., University of Maryland, 1953 Maryland 

John Theodore Drescher, B.A., University of Connecticut, 1958. . . .Connecticut 
Alvin Engel, University of Maryland Maryland 

51 ► 



University of Maryland 

Bernard David Feinberg, College of Charleston South Carolina 

Henry Anthony Fischer, B.S., University of Florida, 1958 Florida 

James Scott Foulke, B.S., University of Maryland, 1956 Maryland 

Neil Arthur Friedman, University of Southern California California 

Richard Saul Friedman, A.B., Rutgers University, 1957 New Jersey 

Thomas Brent Gable, Franklin and Marshall College Pennsylvania 

Charles Augustus Gallagher, University of Maryland Maryland 

Lawrence Allan Gallerani, B.A., American International College, 1958 

Massachusetts 

Ronald Irvin Glaeser, B.A., Western Maryland College, 1958 Maryland 

Milton Josef Glatzer, A.B., Rutgers College, 1958 .New Jersey 

Harold Israel Glazer, University of Maryland Maryland 

Milton Perry Glazer, University of Maryland Maryland 

*Stuart Howard Goldfine, University of Maryland Maryland 

Marshall Robert Goldman, University of Maryland Maryland 

George Joseph Goodreau, Jr., A.B., St. Anselm's College, 1953. .New Hampshire 

Robert Gordon, A.B., Boston University, 1958 Massachusetts 

Larry Earl Grace, B.S., Concord College, 1956 West Virginia 

Robert Duane Hackney, The State College of Washington Washington 

Lawrence Frank Halpert, B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1958. .Maryland 

Laurence Eugene Johns, Shepherd College Maryland 

James Paul Johnson, B.S., Mount Saint Mary's College, 1958 Pennsylvania 

Laddie Lynn Jones, B.S., Presbyterian College, 1958 South Carolina 

David Brainard Kirby, Jr., B.A., University of Pennsylvania, 1958. .Pennsylvania 

Martin Kline, Emory University Florida 

Richard Thomas Koritzer, The Johns Hopkins University Maryland 

Robert Alan Kramer, Lafayette College New Jersey 

Elmer Lee, University of California California 

Daniel Levy, Emory University Georgia 

Donald Eugene Lilley, Southern Missionary College Maryland 

Berton Abner Lowell, University of Miami Florida 

Kenneth George Magee, B.S., University of Maryland New Jersey 

Sidney Samuel Markowitz, University of Maryland Maryland 

Joseph David Mechanick, University of Maryland Maryland 

Stephen Mark Millison, University of Maryland Maryland 

Stephen Hollingshead Mills, University of Florida Florid? 

Alan Tatsuo Miyamoto, B.A., Simpson College, 1958 Hawaii 

Kermit Lee Norton, Fresno State College California 

Harvey Sheldon Pallen, University of Florida Florida 

Robert Parker, University of Maryland Maryland 

John Albert Patterson, B.S., Davidson College, 1958 North Carolina 

Allan Buckner Pertnoy, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

Gerald Alan Pinsky, University of Miami Florida 

Albert Louis Pizzi, B.S., Springfield College, 1958 Massachusetts 

* Attended part session 
<J 52 



School of Dentistry 

Allan Posner, B.A., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

Leo Rabago, Jr., Fresno State College California 

Sylvan Rankin, University of Maryland Maryland 

Robert Victor Rapisarda, B.S., Springfield College, 1957 Massachusetts 

Paul Francis Regan, B.A., Boston College, 1958 Massachusetts 

Donald Arthur Romeo, A.B., St. Anselm's College, 1956 Massachusetts 

Lee Howard Roper, University of Maryland New Hampshire 

Ralph Leon Rosnow, B.S., University of Maryland, 1957; 

A.M., The George Washington University, 1958 Maryland 

Jack Arnold Roth, West Virginia University Maryland 

Howard Leslie Rothschild, University of Maryland Maryland 

David Rubin, University of Miami Florida 

Sheldon Allen Rudie, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

Howard Frederick Rudo, B.A., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

Joseph Anthony Salvo, Jr., B.S., Tufts College, 1958 Massachusetts 

Earle Milton Schulz, Jr., University of Maryland Maryland 

Howard Erwin Schunick, University of Maryland Maryland 

Frank Lewis Schwartz, University of Maryland Maryland 

Allen Hirch Simmons, A.B., Fresno State College, 1955 California 

Reed Campbell Snow, University of Utah Utah 

Theodore Sheldon Sobkov, B.A., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

Irvin Murray Sopher, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

Kenneth Bernard Stern, University of Maryland Maryland 

Dennis Martin Sullivan, University of Georgia South Carolina 

John Thomson, III, Houghton College New Jersey 

Norman Michael Trabulsy, B.S., University of Miami, 1957 Florida 

Alan Jay Trager, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

Lamar Gordon Warren, Jr., University of Florida Florida 

Robert William Warson, B.S., Loyola College, 1958 Maryland 

Warren George Watrel, B.S., Syracuse University, 1957; M.S., 1958 

New Jersey 

Roger Allan Webster, University of Oregon California 

Jerome Jacob Weinstein, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

John Charles Wilhelm, A.B., Western Maryland College, 1953 Maryland 

Rex Patrick Wood, B.S., The State College of Washington, 1958. . .Washington 
David Ansel Young, Whittier College California 



53 



University of Maryland 

DEANS OF DENTAL SCHOOLS IN BALTIMORE 

BALTIMORE COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 

(Founded 1840) 

Chapin A. Harris 1840-1841 

Thomas E. Bond 1841-1842 

Washington R. Handy 1842-1853 

Philip H. Austen 1853-1865 

Ferdinand J. S. Gorgas 1865—1882 

Richard B. Winder .' 1882-1894 

M. Whilldin Foster 1894-1914 

William G. Foster 1914-1923 

MARYLAND DENTAL COLLEGE 

1873-1878 (Merged with B. C. D. S.) 

Richard B. Winder 1873-1878 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

(Founded 1882) 

Ferdinand J. S. Gorgas 1882—191 1 

Timothy O. Heatwole 191 1 — 1923 

BALTIMORE MEDICAL COLLEGE 

1895-1913 (Merged with U. of Md.) 

J. William Smith 1895-1901 

William A. Montell 1901-1903 

j. Edgar Orrison 1903-1904 

J. William Smith 1904-1913 

BALTIMORE COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 

DENTAL SCHOOL 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

(B. C. D. S. Joined the U. of Md. 1923) 

Timothy O. Heatwole 1923-1924 

J. Ben Robinson 1924-1953 

Myron S. Aisenberg (Acting) 1953 

Myron S. Aisenberg 1954— present 

^ 54 



School of Dentistry 

INDEX 

Academic Calendar 2 

Admission Requirements 11 

Admission with Advanced Standing 14 

Alumni Association 38-39 

Anatomy 23-24 

Application Procedures 13 

Arts and Sciences— Dental Program 11-13 

Attendance Requirements 14 

Biochemistry 24 

Board of Regents 1 

Curriculum, Arts— Dentistry 12 

Curriculum, Plan of 21-22 

Deans of the Baltimore Dental Schools 54 

Definition of Residence and Non-Residence 18 

Dental History and Literature 24-25 

Dental Prosthesis 

Removable Complete and Partial Prosthesis 25-26 

Fixed Partial Prosthesis 26-27 

Deportment 15 

Description of Courses 23-37 

Diagnosis 27 

Equipment Requirements 15 

Faculty Listing 3-8 

Fees, Graduate 17 

Fees, Student 16 

Freshman Class 51-53 

Gorgas Odontological Society 37 

Grading and Promotion 14-15 

Graduating Class (1957-58 Session) 41-43 

Graduation Requirements 15-16 

Histology 27-28 

History of the School 9-10 

Index 55-56 

Junior Class 46-48 

Library 10 

Matriculation and Enrollment 13 

Medicine 

General Medicine 28 

Oral Medicine 29 

Microbiology 29-30 

Officers of Administration 3 

Officers of Instruction 3-8 

Omicron Kappa Upsilon 37-38 

Operative Dentistry 30-3 1 

55 ► 



University of Maryland 

INDEX QcontinuecT) 

Orthodontics 31 

Pathology 31-32 

Pedodontics 32-33 

Pharmacology 33 

Physiology 34 

Postgraduate Courses 17 

Practice Administration 34-35 

Promotion and Grading 14-15 

Refunds 17 

Registration 17 

Requirements for Admission 11 

Requirements for Graduation 15-16 

Requirements for Matriculation and Enrollment 13 

Roentgenology 35 

Scholarship and Loan Funds 19-20 

Senior Class 43-46 

Senior Prize Awards 39-40 

Sophomore Class 49-5 1 

Summer Courses 37 

Student Health Service 18-19 

Surgery 35-36 

Visual Aids 36-37 



56 



1Q60 



No. 13 



>f I 



eit B<e 



1960-1961 




V OF 







196C 








1961 




JANUARY I960 






JULY 1966 






JANUARY 1M1 




JULY 1961 


S M T W T 


F 


s 


S 


M T W T F 


S 


S 


M T W T 


F S 


S 


M T W T F S 




1 


2 




1 


2 


1 


2 8 4 6 


6 7 




1 


3 4 5 6 7 


8 


9 


3 


4 5 6 7 8 


9 


8 


9 10 11 12 


18 14 


I 


3 4 5 6 7 8 


10 11 12 IS 14 


15 


16 


10 


11 12 13 14 15 


16 


15 


16 17 18 19 


20 21 


9 


10 11 12 13 14 15 


17 18 19 20 21 


22 


23 


17 


18 19 20 21 22 


23 


22 


23 24 25 26 


27 28 


16 


17 18 19 20 21 22 


24 25 26 27 28 


29 


30 


24 


25 26 27 28 29 


30 


29 80 81 




23 


24 25 26 27 28 29 


31 






31 












30 


31 


FEBRUARY 






AUGUST 






FEBRUARY 




AUGUST 


S M T W T 


F 


s 


S 


M T W T F 


S 


S 


M T W T 


F S 


S 


M T W T F S 


12 3 4 


5 


6 




12 3 4 5 


6 




1 8 


8 4 




12 8 4 6 


7 8 9 10 11 


12 


13 


7 


8 9 10 11 12 


18 


5 


6 7 8 9 


10 11 


6 


7 8 9 10 11 12 


14 15 16 17 18 


19 


20 


14 


15 16 17 18 19 


20 


12 


13 14 15 16 


17 18 


13 


14 15 16 17 18 19 


21 22 23 24 25 


26 


27 


21 


22 23 24 25 26 


27 


19 


20 21 22 23 


24 26 


20 


21 22 23 24 25 26 


28 29 






28 


29 30 31 




26 


27 28 




27 


28 29 30 31 


MARCH 








SEPTEMBER 






MARCH 






SEPTEMBER 


S M T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M T W T F 


s 


s 


M T W T 


F S 


S 


M T W T F S 


12 3 


4 


6 




1 2 


8 




1 3 


8 4 




1 2 


6 7 8 9 10 


11 


12 


4 


5 6 7 8 9 


10 


5 


6 7 8 9 


10 11 


3 


4 5 6 7 8 9 


13 14 15 16 17 


18 


19 


11 


12 18 14 15 16 


17 


12 


18 14 16 16 


17 18 


10 


11 12 13 14 15 16 


20 21 22 23 24 


25 


26 


18 


19 20 21 22 23 


24 


19 


20 21 22 28 


24 26 


17 


18 19 20 21 22 28 


27 28 29 30 31 






25 


26 27 28 29 80 




26 


27 28 29 80 


81 


24 


26 26 27 28 29 80 


APRIL 








OCTOBER 






APRIL 






OCTOBER 


S M T W T 


F 


S 


s 


M T W T F 


s 


S 


M T W T 


F S 


S 


M T W T F S 




1 


2 






1 






1 


1 


2 3 4 6 6 7 


3 4 5 6 7 


8 


9 


2 


8 4 5 6 7 


8 


2 


3 4 5 6 


7 8 


8 


9 10 11 12 IS 14 


10 11 12 18 14 


15 


16 


9 


10 11 12 18 14 


15 


9 


10 11 12 18 


14 15 


15 


16 17 18 19 20 21 


17 18 19 20 21 


22 


28 


16 


17 18 19 20 21 


22 


16 


17 18 19 20 


21 22 


22 


23 24 25 26 27 28 


24 25 26 27 28 


29 


30 


23 


24 25 26 27 28 29 


23 


24 25 26 27 


28 29 


29 


30 81 








30 


81 




30 










MAY 








NOVEMBER 






MAY 






NOVEMBER 


S M T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M T W T F 


S 


S 


M T W T 


F S 


S 


M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 


6 


7 




12 3 4 


5 




12 3 4 


6 6 




13 8 4 


8 9 10 11 12 


13 


14 


6 


7 8 9 10 11 


12 


7 


8 9 10 11 


12 13 


5 


6 7 8 9 10 11 


15 16 17 18 19 


20 


21 


13 


14 15 16 17 18 


19 


14 


15 16 17 18 


19 20 


12 


13 14 15 16 17 18 


22 23 24 25 26 


27 


28 


20 


21 22 23 24 25 


26 


21 


22 23 24 25 


26 27 


19 


20 21 22 23 24 25 


29 30 31 






27 


28 29 80 




28 


29 30 31 




26 


27 28 29 30 


JUNE 








DECEMBER 






JUNE 






DECEMBER 


S M T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M T W T F 


S 


S 


M T W T 


F S 


S 


M T W T F S 


1 3 


3 


4 




1 2 


3 




1 


2 8 




1 2 


5 6 7 8 9 


10 


11 


4 


6 6 7 8 9 


10 


4 


5 6 7 8 


9 10 


3 


4 6 6 7 8 9 


12 13 14 15 16 


17 


18 


11 


12 13 14 16 16 


17 


11 


12 18 14 15 


16 17 


10 


11 12 IS 14 15 16 


19 20 21 22 23 


24 


25 


18 


19 20 21 22 23 


24 


18 


19 20 21 22 


28 24 


17 


18 19 20 21 22 28 


26 27 28 29 30 






25 


26 27 28 29 80 


81 


25 


26 27 28 29 


30 


24 
31 


25 26 27 28 29 80 



ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTIETH CATALOGUE 

with 

Announcements For 

The 1960-1961 Session 




BALTIMORE COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 
DENTAL SCHOOL 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 



THE PROVISIONS of this publication are not to be regarded as an irrevocable con- 
tract between the student and the University of Maryland. The University reserves 
the right to change any provision or requirement at any time within the student's 
term of residence. The University further reserves the right at any time, to ask a 
student to withdraw when it considers such action to be in the best interests of the 
University. 




'"* 



s BOARD OF REGENTS 

and 

MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE 

Term 
Expires 
Charles P. McCormick 

Chairman 1966 

McCormick and Company, 414 Light Street, Baltimore 2 

Edward F. Holter 

Vice-Chairman 1968 

The National Grange, 1616 H Street, N.W., Washington 6 

B. Herbert Brown 

Secretary 1967 

The Baltimore Institute, 10 West Chase Street, Baltimore 1 

Harry H. Nuttle 

Treasurer 1966 

Denton 

Louis L. Kaplan 

Assistant Secretary 1961 

5800 Park Heights Avenue, Baltimore 15 

C. Ewlng Tuttle 

Assistant Treasurer 1962 

907 Latrobe Building, Charles and Read Streets, Baltimore 2 

Richard W. Case 1967 

Commercial Credit Building, 300 St. Paul Place, Baltimore 2 

Thomas W. Pangborn 1965 

The Pangborn Corporation, Pangborn Blvd., Hagerstown 

Thomas B. Symons 1963 

Suburban Trust Company, 6950 Carroll Avenue, Takoma Park 

William C. Walsh 1968 

Liberty Trust Building, Cumberland 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst 1967 

4101 Greenway, Baltimore 18 

Members of the Board were appointed by the Governor of the State for terms of 
nine years each, beginning the first Monday in June. 

Members of the Board appointed to serve after June 1, 1960 are limited to two con- 
secutive seven-year terms. 

The President of the University of Maryland is by law, Executive Officer of the 
Board. 

The State law provides that the Board of Regents of the University of Maryland 
shall constitute the Maryland State Board of Agriculture. 



University of Maryland 

ACADEMIC CALENDAR 

1960-1961 Session 

First Semester 

1960 

September 19 Monday Orientation Program for Freshman Class 

September 20 Tuesday Registration for Freshman Class 

September 21 Wednesday . . Registration for Sophomore Class 

September 22 Thursday .... Registration for Junior and Senior Classes 

September 23 Friday Instruction begins with first scheduled period 

November 22 Tuesday Thanksgiving recess begins at close of last 

scheduled period 

November 28 Monday Instruction resumes with first scheduled period 

December 21 Wednesday . . Christmas recess begins at close of last 

scheduled period 

1961 

January 3 Tuesday Instruction resumes with first scheduled period 

January 20 Friday Inauguration Day— holiday 

January 30 Monday, 

and 31 Tuesday Second Semester Registration 

February 3 Friday First Semester ends at the close of last 

scheduled period 

Second Semester 

February 6 Monday Instruction begins with first scheduled period 

February 22 Wednesday . . Washington's Birthday— holiday 

March 30 Thursday .... Easter recess begins at close of last scheduled 

period 

April 4 Tuesday Instruction resumes with first scheduled period 

May 30 Tuesday Memorial Day— holiday 

June 7 Wednesday . . Second Semester ends at close of last 

scheduled period 
June 10 Saturday Commencement 



A student who registers after instruction begins must pay a late registration fee of 
$5.00. No late registration will be approved after Friday of the first week of instruction. 

M 2 



School of Dentistry 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

wilson homer elkins, President of the University 

B.A., M.A., B.LITT., D.PHIL. 

MYRON S. AISENBERG, Dean 
D.D.S. 

Katharine toomey, Administrative Assistant 

LL.D. 

G. watson algire, Director of Admissions and Registrations 

B.A., M.S. 

norma j. azlein, Registrar 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 
1959-1960 SESSION 



Emeritus 



j. ben robinson, Dean Emeritus 
D.D.S., d.sc. 

Professors 

myron s. aisenberg, Professor of Pathology 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1922. 

Joseph calton biddix, jr., Professor of Oral Diagnosis 
d.d.s. , University of Maryland, 1934. 

Edward c. dobbs, Professor of Pharmacology and Therapeutics 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1929; b.s., 1952. 

erice marden dorsey, Professor of Oral Surgery 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1927. 

Gardner Patrick henry Foley, Professor of Dental Literature 

b.a., Clark University, 1923; m.a., 1926. 

Grayson wilbur gaver, Professor of Dental Prosthesis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1922. 

William edward hahn, Professor of Anatomy 

d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1931; a.b., University of Rochester, 1938; m.s., 1939. 

jose e. medina, Professor of Operative Dentistry 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1948. 

Ernest b. nuttall, Professor of Vixed Partial Prosthesis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1931. 

3 ► 



University of Maryland 

*robert harold oster, Professor of Physiology 

b.s., The Pennsylvania State University, 1923; m.s., 1926; ph.d., Harvard Uni- 
versity, 1933. 

kyrle- w. preis, Professor of Orthodontics 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1929. 

d. Vincent provenza, Professor of Histology and Embryology 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1939; m.s., 1941; ph.d., 1952. 

wilbur owen ramsey, Professor of Dental Prosthesis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1943. 

donald E. shay, Professor of Microbiology 

B.s., Lebanon Valley College, 1937; m.s., University of Maryland, 1938; ph.d., 1943 

E. g. vanden bosche, Professor of Biochemistry 

a.b., Lebanon Valley College, 1922; m.s., University of Maryland, 1924; ph.d., 1927. 

Associate Professors 

Joseph Patrick cappuccio, Associate Professor of Oral Surgery 

b.s., University of Rhode Island, 1943; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1946. 

Stanley h. dosh, Associate Professor of Fixed Partial Prosthesis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1935. 

alvin f. Gardner, Associate Professor of Pathology 

a.a., University of Florida, 1940; d.d.s., Emory University, 1943; m.s., University of 
Illinois, 1957; Ph.D., Georgetown University, 1959. 

harold golton, Associate Professor of Oral Diagnosis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1925. 

yam-hin louie, Associate Professor of Operative Dentistry 

b.s., Lingnan University, Canton, China, 1938; d.d.s., Northwestern University, 
1945; m.s.d., 1946. 

george mclean, Associate Professor of Physical Diagnosis and Principles of 
Medicine 

m.d., University of Maryland, 1916. 

peter mclean lu, Associate Professor of Fixed Partial Prosthesis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1934. 

Walter l. oggesen, Associate Professor of Fixed Partial Prosthesis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1926. 

burton Robert pollack, Associate Professor of Physiology 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1946. 



* Deceased January 2, 1960. 
M 4 



School of Dentistry 

douglas john sanders, Associate Professor of Pedodontics 
b.s., Northwestern University, 1946; d.d.s., 1948. 

E. Roderick Shipley, Associate Professor of Physiology 

a.b., The Johns Hopkins University, 1938; m.d., University of Maryland, 1942. 

guy paul Thompson, Associate Professor of Anatomy 
a.b., West Virginia University, 1923; a.m., 1929. 

l. edward warner, Associate Professor of Dental Prosthesis 
d.d.s. , University of Maryland, 1931. 

tobias Weinberg, Associate Professor of Pathology 
a.b., The Johns Hopkins University, 1930: m.d., 1933. 

Assistant Professors 

irving i. abramson, Assistant Professor of Oral Medicine 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1932. 

alvin david aisenberg, Assistant Professor of Pathology 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1945. 

hugh m. clement, jr., Assistant Professor of Operative Dentistry 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1944. 

fred ehrlich, Assistant Professor of Pedodontics 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1947. 

Calvin Joseph gaver, Assistant Professor of Operative Dentistry 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1950; d.d.s., 1954. 

conrad l. inman, Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology 
d.d.s., Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, 1915. 

william kress, Assistant Professor of Orthodontics 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1936. 

george w. piavis, Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

a.b., Western Maryland College, 1948; m.ed., 1952; ph.d., Duke University, 1958. 

Norton morris ross, Assistant Professor of Pharmacology 

b.s., University of Connecticut, 1949; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1954. 

daniel edward shehan, Assistant Professor of Orthodontics 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1922. 

Arthur g. siwinski, Assistant Professor of Oral Surgery 

a.b., The Johns Hopkins University, 1927; m.d., University of Maryland, 1931. 

d. Robert swinehart, Assistant Professor of Orthodontics 

a.b., Dartmouth College, 1933; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1937. 

edmond g. vanden bosche, Assistant Professor of Tooth Morphology 

b.s., The Pennsylvania State University, 1943; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1947. 



University of Maryland 

david h. willer, Assistant Professor of Full Denture Prosthesis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1933. 

Special Lecturers 

c. richard fravel, Lecturer in Principles of Medicine 
m.d., University of Maryland, 1949. 

martin helrich, Professor of Anesthesiology (School of Medicine') 
e.s., Dickinson College, 1946; m.d., University of Pennsylvania, 1946. 

richard lindenberg, Lecturer in Neuroanatomy 
m.d., University of Berlin, 1944. 

ethelbert lovett, Lecturer in Ethics 

d.d.s. , Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, 1922. 

William j. o'donnell, Lecturer in jurisprudence 

a.b., Loyola College, 1937; ll.b., University of Maryland, 1941. 

harry m. robinson, jr., Professor of Dermatology (School of Medicine) 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1931; m.d., 1935. 

george herschel yeager, Professor of Clinical Surgery (School of Medicine) 
b.s., West Virginia University, 1927; m.d., University of Maryland, 1929. 

Instructors 

sterrett p. beaven, Instructor in Operative Dentistry 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1941. 

earl F. becker, Instructor in Microbiology 

b.s., Muhlenberg College, 1951; M.S., George Washington University, 1957. 

henry j. bianco, Instructor in Operative Dentistry 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1956. 

samuel hollinger bryant, Instructor in Oral Diagnosis 

a.b., Western Maryland College, 1928; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1932. 

thomas F. clement, Instructor in Oral Medicine 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1951. 

jerome s. cullen, Instructor in Clinical Orthodontics 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1941. 

jose h. diaz, Instructor in Operative Dentistry 

b.s., University of Puerto Rico, 1941; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1950. 

frank A. dolle, Instructor in Pharmacology and Therapeutics 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1948; M.S., 1950; ph.d., 1954; d.d.s., 1959. 

conrad c. ferlita, Instructor in Pedodontics 

b.s., University of Miami, 1956; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1959. 



School of Dentistry 

john m. foley, Instructor in Oral Medicine 

b.s., Loyola College, 1955; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1959. 

ralph jack Gordon, Instructor in Dental Prosthesis 
d.d.s. , University of Maryland, 1933. 

marvin m. graham, Instructor in Fixed Partial Prosthesis 

a.b., Cornell University, 1938; a.m., 1939; d.d.s., University of Pennsylvania, 1943. 

Walter granruth, jr., Instructor in Pathology 

b.s., Loyola College, 1950; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1954. 

Robert l. heldrich, Instructor in Oral Diagnosis 

a.b., Gettysburg College, 1951; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1955. 

richard m. hemphill, Instructor in Oral Surgery 

a.b., West Virginia University, 1954; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1958. 

melvin john jagielski, Instructor in Tooth Morphology 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1953. 

peter l. johnson, Instructor in Oral Surgery 

b.a., Hofstra College, 1953; d.d.s., Georgetown University, 1957. 

francis j. kihn, Instructor in Pedodontics 

b.s., Loyola College, 1952; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1956. 

anthony j. klein, Instructor in Roentgenology 

b.s., University of Cincinnati, 1954; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1958. 

lester lebo, Instructor in Oral Diagnosis 
b.s., University of Chicago, 1938; m.d., 1941. 

charles brown Leonard, jr., Instructor in Biochemistry 

b.a., Rutgers College of South Jersey, 1955; m.s., University of Maryland, 1957. 

richard r. c Leonard, Instructor in Public Health Dentistry 

d.d.s., Indiana University, 1922; m.s.p.h., University of Michigan, 1944. 

Herbert g. levin, Instructor in Operative Dentistry 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1958. 

charles e. loveman, Instructor in Anatomy 

a.b., The Johns Hopkins University, 1935; d.d.s., Columbia University, 1939. 

martin h. morris, Instructor in Biochemistry 
b.s., Rutgers University, 1952; m.s., 1954. 

james p. norris, Instructor in Oral Medicine 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1950; d.d.s., 1956. 

frank n. ogden, Instructor in First Aid and in Charge of Medical Care of Stu- 
dents 
m.d., University of Maryland, 1917. 

victor s. primrose, Instructor in Full Denture Prosthesis 
d.d.s., McGill University, 1918. 

myron hillard sachs, Instructor in Anatomy 
d.d.s., Columbia University, 1939. 

7 ► 



University of Maryland 

Joseph h. seipp, Instructor in Histology aud Embryology 

a.b., Loyola College, 1951; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1955; M.S., University of 
Pittsburgh, 1957. 

philip smith, Instructor in Roentgenology 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1959. 

leah m. p. staling, Instructor in Physiology 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1944; M.S., 1948. 

glenn d. Steele, Instructor in Fixed Partial Prosthesis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1942. 

claude p. taylor, Director of Visual Education 

Francis a. veltre, Instructor in Operative Dentistry 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1952; M.S., 1954; d.d.s., 1959. 

earle Harris watson, Instructor in Dental Materials and Dental Prosthesis 
a.b. University of North Carolina, 1938; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1942. 

nelson a. wright, Instructor in Pull Denture Prosthesis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1955. 

george d. yent, jr., Instructor in Oral Diagnosis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1956. 

Graduate Assistants 

john j. Jordan, Graduate Assistant in Histology and Embryology 
b.s., University of Scranton, 1957. 

Library Staff 

IDA marian robinson, Librarian and Associate Professor of Library Science 

a.b., Cornell University, 1924; b.s.l.s., Columbia University School of Library 
Service, 1944. 

Hilda e. moore, Associate Librarian and Assistant Professor of Library Science 
a.b., Randolph-Macon Woman's College, 1936; a.b.l.s., Emory University Library 
School, 1937. 

Beatrice marriott, Reference Librarian 
a.b., University of Maryland, 1944. 

edith m. coyle, Periodicals Librarian 

a.b., University of North Carolina, 1937; a.b.l.s., University of North Carolina 
School of Library Science, 1939; m.a., The Johns Hopkins University, 1945. 

Eleanor m. mitten, Chief Cataloguer 

b.s., Cornell University, 1942; b.s.l.s., Syracuse University, 1949. 

marjorie vilk, Cataloguer 

b.s., Kutztown State Teachers College, 1952. 

marie martin, Library Assistant 

Jacqueline b. clem, Assistant to the Librarian 

betty b. linkous, Assistant to the Cataloguer 

<* 8 



THE SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 
Historv 

THE BALTIMORE COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY OCCUPIES AN IMPORTANT AND 
interesting place in the history of dentistry. At the end of the regular ses- 
sion— 1959-60— it completed its one hundred and twentieth year of service to 
dental education. The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery represents the first 
effort in history to offer institutional dental education to those anticipating the 
practice of dentistry. 

The first lectures on dentistry in America were delivered by Dr. Horace 
H. Hayden in the University of Maryland, School of Medicine, between the 
years 1823-25. These lectures were interrupted in 1825 by internal dissensions 
in the School of Medicine and were as a consequence discontinued. It was Dr. 
Hayden's idea that dental education merited greater attention than had been 
given it by medicine or could be given it by the preceptorial plan of dental 
teaching then in vogue. 

Dr. Horace H. Hayden began the practice of dentistry in Baltimore in 1800. 
From that time he made a zealous attempt to lay the foundation for a scientific, 
serviceable dental profession. In 1831 Dr. Chapin A. Harris came to Baltimore 
to study under Hayden. Dr. Harris was a man of unusual ability and possessed 
special qualifications to aid in establishing and promoting formal dental educa- 
tion. Since Dr. Hayden's lectures had been interrupted at the University of 
Maryland and there was an apparent unsurmountable difficulty confronting the 
creation of dental departments in medical schools, an independent college was 
decided upon. A charter was applied for and granted by the Maryland Legis- 
lature February 1, 1840. The first Faculty meeting was held February 3, 1840, 
at which time Dr. Horace H. Hayden was elected President and Dr. Chapin A. 
Harris, Dean. The introductory lecture was delivered by Dr. Hayden on Novem- 
ber 3, 1840, to the five students matriculating in the first class. Thus was 
created as the foundation of the present dental profession the Baltimore College 
of Dental Surgery, the first dental school in the world. 

Hayden and Harris, the admitted founders of conventional dental education, 
contributed, in addition to the factor of dental education, other opportunities for 
professional growth and development. In 1839 the American Journal of Dental 
Science was founded, with Chapin A. Harris as its editor. Dr. Harris continued 
fully responsible for dentistry's initial venture into periodic dental literature to 
the time of his death. The files of the old American Journal of Dental Science 
testify to the fine contributions made by Dr. Harris. In 1840 the American 
Society of Dental Surgeons was founded, with Dr. Horace H. Hayden as its 
President and Dr. Chapin A. Harris as its Corresponding Secretary. This was 
the beginning of dental organization in America, and was the forerunner of the 
American Dental Association, which now numbers approximately ninety-three 
thousand in its present membership. The foregoing suggests the unusual in- 
fluence Baltimore dentists and the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery have 
exercised on professional ideals and policies. 

9 ► 



University of Maryland 

In 1873, the Maryland Dental College, an offspring of the Baltimore College 
of Dental Surgery, was organized. It continued instruction until 1878, at which 
time it was consolidated with the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery. A de- 
partment of dentistry was organized at the University of Maryland in the year 
1882, graduating a class each year from 1883 to 1923. This school was chartered 
as a corporation and continued as a privately owned and directed institution until 
1920, when it became a State institution. The Dental Department of the Balti- 
more Medical College was established in 1895, continuing until 1913, when it 
merged with the Dental Department of the University of Maryland. 

The final combining of the dental educational interests of Baltimore was 
effected June 15, 1923, by the amalgamation of the student bodies of the Balti- 
more College of Dental Surgery and the University of Maryland, School of 
Dentistry; the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery becoming a distinct depart- 
ment of the University under State supervision and control. Thus we find in the 
Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, University of Maryland, a 
merging of the various efforts at dental education in Maryland. From these 
component elements have radiated developments of the art and science of dentis- 
try until the strength of its alumni is second to none, in either number or degree 
of service to the profession. 

Library 

This School is fortunate in having one of the better equipped and organized 
libraries among the dental schools of the country. The dental collection is part 
of the Health Sciences Library, which includes also pharmacy, medicine and 
nursing, with about 86,000 bound volumes and over 1600 current subscriptions 
to scientific periodicals. A new air-conditioned, four-story library building at 
111 South Greene, across the street from the Dental School, provides ample 
space for books and readers. A well-qualified staff of professionally trained and 
certified librarians promotes the services of the library and assists the student 
body in the use of library resources. One of the most important factors of the 
dental student's education is to teach him the value and the use of dental 
literature in his formal education and in promoting his usefulness and value to 
the profession during practice. The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery is 
ideally equipped to achieve this aim of dental instruction. 

Course of Instruction 

The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, University of 
Maryland offers a course in dentistry devoted to instruction in the medical 
sciences, the dental sciences, and clinical practice. Instruction consists of didactic 
lectures, laboratory instruction, demonstrations, conferences, quizzes and hos- 
pital ward rounds. Topics are assigned for collateral reading to train the student 
in the value and use of dental literature. The curriculum for the complete 
course appears on pages 22 and 23 of this catalogue. 

<+ 10 



School of Dentistry 

Requirements for Admission 

Applicants for admission must present evidence of having completed success- 
fully two academic years of work in an accredited college of arts and sciences 
based upon the completion of a four-year high school course or the equivalent 
in entrance examinations. The college course must include at least a year's 
credit in English, in biology, in physics, in inorganic chemistry, and in organic 
chemistry. All required science courses shall include both classroom and labor- 
atory instruction. Although a minimum of 60 semester hours of credit, exclusive 
of physical education and military science, is required, additional courses in the 
humanities and the natural and social sciences are desirable. By ruling of the 
Dean's Council, all admission requirements must be completed by June 30 previ- 
ous to the desired date of admission. 

In considering candidates for admission, the Board of Admissions will give 
preference to those applicants who have high scholastic records in secondary 
school and in college; who make satisfactory scores in the dental aptitude test; 
who present favorable recommendations from their respective predental com- 
mittee or from one instructor in each of the departments of biology, chemistry, 
and physics; and who, in all other respects, give every promise of becoming suc- 
cessful students and dentists of high standing. Applicants will not be admitted 
with unabsolved conditions or unabsolved failures. 

Combined Arts and Sciences-Dental Program 

The University offers a combined arts and sciences-dental curriculum lead- 
ing to the degrees of Bachelor of Science and Doctor of Dental Surgery. The 
preprofessional part of this curriculum shall be taken in residence in the College 
of Arts and Sciences at College Park, and the professional part in the School of 
Dentistry in Baltimore. 

Students who elect the combined program and who have completed the arts 
and sciences phase of it may, upon the recommendation of the Dean of the 
School of Dentistry, be granted the degree of Bachelor of Science by the College 
of Arts and Sciences at the first summer commencement following the comple- 
tion of the student's first year in the School of Dentistry. A student may enter 
the arts and sciences-dental program at College Park with advanced standing 
from an accredited college or university, but the last year of the preprofessional 
training must be completed at College Park and the professional training must 
be completed in the School of Dentistry of the University of Maryland. 



11 



University of Maryland 

ARTS-DENTISTRY CURRICULUM 

r-Semester—s 

"Freshman Year 1 11 

Eng. 1, 2— Composition and American Literature 3 3 

Zool. 1— General Zoology 4 

Zool. 2— The Animal Phyla . . 4 

Chem. 1, 3— General Chemistry 4 4 

Math. 10, 11— Algebra, Trigonometry, Analytic Geometry.... 3 3 

Speech 7 . . 2 

Physical Activities 1 1 

A. 'S. 1, 2-Basic Air Force ROTC (Men) 2 2 

Hea. 2, 4-Hygiene (Women) 2 2 

Total 17 19 

Sophomore Year 

Eng. 3, 4 or 5, 6— Composition and World or English 

Literature 3 3 

*Group I Elective 3 

G. & P. 1— American Government . . 3 

Chem. 35, 36, 37, 38-Organic Chemistry 4 4 

**H. 5, 6— History of American Civilization 3 3 

* * *Modern Language 3 3 

Physical Activities 1 1 

A. S. 3, 4-Basic Air Force ROTC (Men) 2 2 

Total 17-19 17-19 

Junior Year 

Modern Language (continued) 3 3 

Phys. 10, 1 1— Fundamentals of Physics 4 4 

Approved Minor Courses 6 6 

Electives 3 3 

Total 16 16 

Senior Year 

The curriculum of the first year of the School of Dentistry of the University 
of Maryland is accepted by the College of Arts and Sciences as the fourth year 
(major sequence) of academic work toward the degree of Bachelor of Science. 



*Group I Electives: Sociology 1, Philosophy 1, Psychology 1, Economics 37. 
** Students planning to request admission to a Dental School with only two years 
of predental training should take Physics 10-11. 
***Fr. 6 7 or Ger. 6, 7 (Intermediate Scientific French or German) recommended. 



12 



School of Dentistry 

If at the end of the junior year the student decides to postpone his entrance 
to the School of Dentistry and to remain in the College of Arts and Sciences 
and complete work for the Bachelor's degree, he may choose a major and minor 
in any of the departments in which he has completed the necessary underclass 
requirements. The general nature of the first three years of this curriculum and 
the generous electives of the third year make possible for the student a wide 
choice of departments in which he may specialize. In general the electives ot 
the third year will be chosen as for a major in some particular department. 

Requirements for Matriculation and Enrollment 

In the selection of students to begin the study of dentistry the School con- 
siders particularly a candidate's proved ability in secondary education and his 
successful completion of prescribed courses in predental collegiate training. The 
requirements for admission and the academic regulations of the College of Arts 
and Sciences, University of Maryland, are strictly adhered to by the School of 
Dentistry. 

A student is not regarded as having matriculated in the School of Dentistry 
until such time as he shall have paid the matriculation fee of $10.00, and is not 
enrolled until he shall have paid a deposit of $200.00. This deposit is intended 
to insure registration in the class and is not returnable. 

Application Procedures 

Candidates seeking admission to the Dental School should write to the Office 
of the Dean requesting an application form. Each applicant should fill out 
the blank in its entirety and mail it promptly, together with the application fee 
and photographs, to the Board of Admissions, Dental School, University of 
Maryland, Baltimore 1, Maryland. The Board of Admissions will acknowledge 
promptly the receipt of the application. If this acknowledgment is not received 
within ten days, the applicant should contact the Board immediately. The 
early filing of an application is urged. Applications may be filed after June 1 
of the year previous to the desired date of admission and during the next nine 
months (to March 1). Applicants wishing advice on any problem relating to 
their predental training or their application should communicate with the Board 
of Admissions. 

All applicants will be required to take the Dental Aptitude Test. This test 
will be given at various testing centers throughout the United States, its pos- 
sessions and Canada. Applicants will be notified by the Council on Dental Educa- 
tion of the American Dental Association of the dates of the tests and the locations 
of the testing centers. 

Promising candidates will be required to appear before the Board of Ad- 
missions for an interview. On the basis of all available information the best 
possible applicants will be chosen for admission to the School. 

A certificate of entrance will be issued to each successful applicant, which will 
permit him to matriculate and to register in the class to which he has applied. 

13 ► 



University of Maryland 

Admission with Advanced Standing 

(a) Graduates in medicine or students in medicine who have completed two 
or more years in a medical school, acceptable to standards in the School of 
Medicine, University of Maryland, may be given advanced standing to the 
Sophomore year provided the applicant shall complete under competent regu- 
lar instruction the courses in dental technology regularly scheduled in the first 
year. 

(b) Applicants for transfer must (1) meet fully the requirements for 
admission to the first year of the dental course; (2) be eligible for promotion to 
the next higher class in the school from which he seeks to transfer; (3) show an 
average grade of five per cent above the passing mark in the school where transfer 
credits were earned; (4) show evidence of scholastic attainments, character and 
personality; (5) present letter of honorable dismissal and recommendation from 
the dean of the school from which he transfers. 

(c) All applicants for transfer must present themselves in person for an 
interview before qualifying certificate can be issued. 

Attendance Requirements 

In order to receive credit for a full session, each student must have entered 
and be in attendance on the day the regular session opens, at which time lectures 
to all classes begin, and remain until the close of the session, the dates for which 
are announced in the calendar of the annual catalogue. 

Regular attendance is demanded. A student whose attendance in any course 
is unsatisfactory to the head of the department will be denied the privilege of 
final examination in any and all such courses. A student with less than 85 per 
cent attendance will not be promoted to the next succeeding year. However, 
in certain unavoidable circumstances of absences, the Dean and the Council 
may honor excuses exceeding the maximum permitted. 

Grading and Promotion 

The following symbols are used as marks for final grades: A (100-91), 
B (90-84), C (83-77), and D (76-70), Passing; F (below 70), Failure; I, In- 
complete. Progress grades in courses are indicated as "Satisfactory" and "Un- 
satisfactory." 

A Failure in any subject may be removed only by repeating the subject in full. 
Students who have done work of acceptable quality in their completed assign- 
ments but who, because of circumstances beyond their control, have been unable 
to finish all assignments, will be given an Incomplete. A student shall not carry 
an Incomplete into the next succeeding year. When he has completed the 
requirements for the removal of an Incomplete, the student shall be given 
the actual grade earned in the course. 

< 14 



School of Dentistry 

Scholastic averages are computed on the basis of semester credits assigned to 
each course and numerical values for grades. The numerical values are A-4; 
B-3; C-2; D-l; F-0. The grade point average is the sum of the products of 
semester credits and grade values, divided by the total number of semester credits. 

Students who attain a grade point average of 1.5 in the Freshman year will 
be promoted. At the end of the Sophomore year an overall grade point average 
of 1.75 is required for promotion. A grade point average of 2.0 is required for 
promotion to the Senior year and for graduation. 

Students who fail to meet the minimum grade point averages required for 
promotion and who fall into the following categories will be allowed proba- 
tionary promotion: 

1. Freshmen who attain a grade point average of 1.25-1.49. 

2. Sophomores who attain an overall grade point average of 1.6-1.74. 

3. Juniors who attain an overall grade point average of 1.85-1.99. 

Probationary status will not be permitted for two successive years. 

A student may absolve a total of eight credit hours of failure in an ac- 
credited summer school provided he has the grade point average required for 
promotion or graduation, excluding the failure or failures which he has incurred. 

Equipment 

A complete list of necessary instruments and materials for technic and clinic 
courses is prescribed by the Dental School. Arrangements are made by the 
Dental School in advance of formal enrollment for books, instruments and ma- 
terials to be delivered to the students at the opening of school. Each student is 
required to provide himself promptly with these prescribed necessities. A student 
who does not meet this requirement will not be permitted to continue with his 
class. 

Deportment 

The profession of dentistry demands, and the School of Dentistry requires, 
of its students evidence of their good moral character. The conduct of the 
student in relation to his work and fellow students will indicate his fitness to 
be taken into the confidence of the community as a professional man. Integrity, 
sobriety, temperate habits, truthfulness, respect for authority and associates and 
honesty in the transaction of business affairs as a student will be considered as 
evidence of good moral character necessary to the granting of a degree. 

Requirements for Graduation 

The degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery is conferred upon a candidate who 
has met the following conditions: 

1. A candidate must furnish documentary evidence that he has attained 
the age of 21 years. 

2. A candidate for graduation shall have attended the full scheduled course 
of four academic years. 

15 ► 



University of Maryland 

3. He will be required to show a grade point average of 2.0 for the full 
course of study. 

4. He shall have satisfied all technic and clinic requirements of the various 
departments. 

5. He shall have paid all indebtedness to the college prior to the beginning 
of final examinations, and must have adjusted his financial obligations in the 
community satisfactorily to those to whom he may be indebted. 

Student Fees 

Matriculation fee (required of all entering students) $ 10.00 

Tuition (each year): 

Non-resident student 750.00 

Resident student 400.00 

Student health service (each year) 20.00 

Student Union fee 30.00 

The Student Union fee is payable by all students enrolled in 
the Professional Schools on the Baltimore campus and is used to 
pay interest on and amortize the cost of construction of the Union 
Building. 

Special fee 10.00 

The Special fee is payable by all full-time students enrolled in 
the Professional Schools on the Baltimore campus and is used to 
finance equipment for the Union Building. 

Student Activities fee 12.50 

For the purpose of administering various student activities, the 
Student Senate, after approval by the separate classes and the 
Faculty Council, voted a fee of $12.50 to be paid at the time of registration. 

Laboratory breakage deposit: 

Freshman year 10.00 

Sophomore and Junior years 5.00 

In addition to fees itemized in the above schedule, the following assess- 
ments are made by the University: 
Application fee (paid at time of filing formal application for admission) 7.50 

Late registration fee 5.00 

(All students are expected to complete their registration, including 
payment of bills, on the regular registration days.) Those who do 
not complete their registration during the prescribed days will be 
charged a fee of $5.00. 

Examinations taken out of class and re-examinations 5.00 

One certified transcript of record is issued free of charge. 

Each additional copy is issued only upon payment of 1.00 

Summer Session students will pay a $6.00 Student Union Fee but will 
not pay the Special Fee. 

< 16 



School of Dentistry 

Postgraduate Courses 

Postgraduate courses may be offered to qualified dental graduates. These 
courses are designed to provide opportunities for study in special fields on a 
refresher level, and are arranged so that particular emphasis is placed on 
clinical practices. 

Graduate Student Fees 

Matriculation Fee (for new students only, non-returnable) 10.00 

Tuition Fee (per semester credit hour) 12.00 

Tuition Fee for students carrying ten or more credit hours per 

semester 120.00 

Laboratory Fees where applicable are charged at the rate of $5.00 
per semester hour of laboratory credit. 

Student Union Fee 

Students carrying ten or more credit hours per semester (per annum) *30.00 

Students carrying less than ten credit hours per semester (per 

annum) *6.00 

Special Fee 

Students carrying ten or more credit hours per semester (per 

annum) *10.00 

Graduation Fee 

Master's Degree 10.00 

Doctor's Degree (including hood and microfilming of thesis) 50.00 

REFUNDS 

According to the policy of the University no fees will be returned. In case 
the student discontinues his course or fails to register after a place has been 
reserved in a class, any fees paid will be credited to a subsequent course, but 
are not transferable. 

Registration 

The registration of a student in any school or college of the University 
shall be regarded as a registration in the University of Maryland, but when 
such student transfers to a professional school of the University or from one 
professional school to another, he must pay the usual matriculation fee required 
by each professional school. 



* Students who initially enroll for the second semester of the school year will be 
assessed at the rate of one half of the rates shown above. 

17 ► 



University of Maryland 

Each student is required to fill in a registration card for the office of the 
Registrar, and make payment of one-half of the tuition fee in addition to all 
other fees noted as payable before being admitted to classwork at the opening 
of the session. The remainder of tuition and fees must be in the hands of the 
Comptroller during registration period for the second half of the academic year. 

Definition of Residence and Non-Residence 

Students who are minors are considered to be resident students if at the 
time of their registration their parents have been domiciled in this state for 
at least one year. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of his 
first registration in the University, and may not thereafter be changed by him 
unless, in the case of a minor, his parents move to and become legal residents 
of the state by maintaining such residence for at least one full year. How- 
ever, the right of the minor student to change from a non-resident to resident 
status must be established by him prior to the registration period for any 
semester. 

Adult students are considered to be residents if at the time of their registra- 
tion they have been domiciled in Maryland for at least one year provided such 
residence has not been acquired while attending any school or college in Mary- 
land or elsewhere. Time spent on active duty in the armed services while sta- 
tioned in Maryland will not be considered as satisfying the one year period 
referred to above except in those cases in which the adult was domiciled in 
Maryland for at least one year prior to his entrance into the armed service and 
was not enrolled in any school during that period. 

The word domicile as used in this regulation shall mean the permanent 
place of abode. For the purpose of this rule only one domicile may be claimed 
as a permanent abode. 

Student Health Service 

The School undertakes to supply medical and surgical care for its students 
through the Student Health Service. This care includes the daily services 
rendered by a physician and a graduate nurse in a well-equipped clinic, conven- 
iently located in the Dental School. Also consultations, surgical procedures and 
hospitalization, judged to be necessary by the Service, are covered under liberal 
limitations, depending on length of hospitalization and special expenses incurred. 

Students who need medical attention are expected to report at the office 
of the Student Health Service. Under circumstances requiring home treatment, 
the students will be visited at their College residences. 

It is not within the scope of the Service to provide medical care for con- 
ditions antedating each annual registration in the University; nor is it the 

^ 18 



School of Dentistry 

function of this Service to treat chronic conditions contracted by students before 
admission or to extend treatment to acute conditions developing in the period 
between academic years or during authorized school vacations. The cost of 
orthopedic applicances, the correction of visual defects, the services of special 
nurses, and special medication must be paid for by the student. The School 
does not accept responsibility for illness or accident occurring away from the 
community, or for expenses incurred for hospitalization or medical services in 
institutions other than the University Hospital, or, in any case, for medical 
expense not authorized by the Student Health Service. 

Every new student is required to undergo a complete physical examination, 
which includes oral diagnosis. Any defects noted must be corrected within the 
first school year. The passing of this examination is a requirement for the final 
acceptance of any student. 

Each matriculant must present, on the day of his enrollment, a statement 
from his ophthalmologist regarding the condition of his eyes, and where defects 
in vision exist he shall show evidence that corrections have been made. 

If a student should enter the hospital during the academic year, the Service 
will arrange for the payment of part or all of the hospital expenses, depending 
on the length of stay and the special expenses incurred. This arrangement applies 
only to students admitted through the office of the School physician. 

Prospective students are advised to have any known physical defects corrected 
before entering the School in order to prevent loss of time which later correction 
might involve. 

Scholarship and Loan Funds 

A number of scholarship loans from various organizations and educational 
foundations are available to students in the School of Dentistry. These loans 
are offered on the basis of excellence in scholastic attainment and the need on 
the part of students for assistance in completing their course in dentistry. It 
has been the policy of the Faculty to recommend only students in the last two 
years for such privileges. 

The Edward S. Gaylord Educational Endowment Fund 

Under a provision of the will of the late Dr. Edward S. Gaylord, of New 
Haven, Connecticut, an amount approximating $16,000 was left to the Baltimore 
College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, University of Maryland, the proceeds 
of which are to be devoted to aiding worthy young men in securing dental 
education. 

The W. K. Kellogg Foundation 

During World War II the Foundation recognized the burden that the 
accelerated course imposed upon many dental students who under normal cir- 

19 ► 



University of Maryland 

cumstances would earn money for their education by employment during the 
summer vacation. The Foundation granted to this School a fund to provide 
rotating loans to deserving dental students. 

The Albert A. Harrington Fund 

This fund was established in 1954 by the New Jersey Alumni Association 
in memory of Dr. Albert A. Harrington, a member of the Class of 1910. The 
fund is a source of valuable help in aiding students to solve their temporary 
financial problems. 

The E. Benton Taylor Scholarship 

One of the finest scholarships in the field of dental education, the E. 
Benton Taylor Scholarship was conceived and arranged by Mrs. Taylor and 
will be perpetuated by the Luther B. Benton Company of Baltimore. It was 
put into operation in 1954 and will be awarded annually to a Maryland student 
of each entering class, who will continue to receive its benefits during the four 
years of his dental school course. 

GENERAL INFORMATION FOR THE BALTIMORE UNION 

PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTIONS 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

The Baltimore Union for students of the Professional Schools is located 
adjacent to the Professional Schools at 621 West Lombard Street. Accommoda- 
tions for 195 men are provided in a five-story semi-air-conditioned building 
which also contains a cafeteria, fountain lounge, meeting rooms, laundry facili- 
ties, game room, bookstore, barber shop and lounges on each floor. Double 
rooms are available. The rental agreement is made for rooms only; meals are 
served cafeteria style on a cash basis. The contract for accommodations covers 
the academic year. 

ACADEMIC YEAR 

The Rates are: 

$150.00 per semester per double room 

$ 60.00 per six weeks' summer session per double room 

Other: 

$45.00 per month 

Three single rooms are available. They will be assigned on the basis of 

length of residence in The Baltimore Union. 

What the Rate covers: 

The rate shown above is per person and includes the following: 

^ 20 



School of Dentistry 

Room furnishings, bed and cover, mattress, chest of drawers, closet, 
book shelves, desk, medicine cabinet, desk chair and desk lamp. 

Maid service will include cleaning of room twice per week and replace- 
ment of change of linen once each week. 

Telephone service is available through the Chesapeake & Potomac Tele- 
phone Company. Cost of the telephone is not included in the room rate. 
Information can be obtained from the Manager's Office. 

Mail semce is also provided. 

The resident provides blankets, towels, pillow and linens. Towels and linens 
must be rented through the designated Commercial Rental Service. 

A small amount of luggage space is available. Storage of anything other than 
luggage will not be available. 

TRANSIENTS 
The Rates are: 

$ 4.00 per day 
$24.00 per week 

What the Rate covers: 

The services will include one bath and one face towel, one face cloth, soap 
.and change of linen daily (once per week if weekly guest). 

HOW TO APPLY FOR A ROOM ASSIGNMENT 

Write for application form to 

MANAGER'S OFFICE 

The Baltimore Union 

621 West Lombard Street 

Baltimore 1, Maryland 



21 



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23 






DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

ANATOMY 

Professor: hahn (head of department). 

Associate Professor: Thompson. 

Assistant Professors: edmond g. vanden bosche, and piavis. 

DRS. JAGIELSKI, LINDENBERG, LOVEMAN, AND SACHS. 

Anat. 111. Human Gross Anatomy. (8) 

First year. This course consists o£ dissection and lectures, supplemented by frequent 
conferences and practical demonstrations. The entire human body is dissected. The 
subject is taught with the purpose of emphasizing the principles of the body structure, 
the knowledge of which is derived from a study of its organs and tissues, and the 
action of its parts. Arrangements can be made to accommodate qualified students 
and dentists interested in research or in making special dissections or topographical 
studies. 

Anat. 112. Human Neuroanatomy. (2) 

First year. Second semester. Prerequisite, Anatomy 111 or equivalent. Neuro- 
anatomy is offered in the Freshman year following Gross Anatomy. The work con- 
sists of a study of the whole brain and spinal cord by gross dissections and micro- 
scopic methods. Correlation is made, whenever possible, with the student's work 
in the histology and physiology of the central nervous system. 

Anat. 113. Comparative Tooth Morphology. (I) 

First year. Second semester. The course treats the evolutionary development of 
dentition as a necessary factor in the study of human oral anatomy. It includes a 
comparative study of the teeth of the animal kingdom, with a comparative study 
of the number, position and form of the teeth. 

Anat. 114. Tooth Morphology. (3) 

First year. Second semester. This course is designed to teach the form and functions 
and the relationships of the teeth, and includes a study of the nomenclature of sur- 
faces, divisions and relations of the teeth. In the laboratory the student is trained 
in the carving of the various teeth and in the dissection of extracted teeth through 
their various dimensions. 

The second part of the course includes a study of the supporting structures of 
the teeth and of the relation of the teeth to these structures. The periods of begin- 
ning calcificaion, eruption, complete calcification, and shedding of the deciduous 
teeth; followed by the periods of beginning calcification, eruption, and complete 
calcification of the permanent teeth, are studied and correlated with the growth in 
size of the jaws and face. 

For Graduates 

Anat. 211. Human Gross Anatomy. (8) 

Same as course 111 but with additional work on a more advanced level. 

^ 24 



School of Dentistry 

Anat. 212. Human Neuroanatomy. (2) 

Same as course 112 but with additional instruction of a more advanced nature. 

Anat. 214. The Anatomy of the Head, and Neck. (3) 

One conference and two laboratory periods per week for one semester. 

Anat. 216. Research. 

Credit determined by amount and quality of work performed. 

BIOCHEMISTRY 

Professor: vanden bosche (head of department). 

MR. MORRIS AND MR. LEONARD. 

Biochem. 111. Principles of Biochemistry. (6) 

First year. Prerequisites inorganic and organic chemistry, with additional training 
in quantitative and physical chemistry desirable. Two lectures and one laboratory 
period throughout the year. The chemistry of living matter forms the basis of the 
course. The detailed subject matter includes the chemistry of carbohydrates, fats, 
proteins, enzymes, vitamins, and hormones. The processes of respiration, digestion, 
metabolism, secretion and excretion are considered. Laboratory instruction in quali- 
tative and quantitative blood and urine examination is included. 

For Graduates 

Biochem. 211. Advanced Biochemistry. (6) 

Prerequisite Biochemistry 111. Two lectures, one conference and one laboratory 

period throughout the year. 

Biochem. 212. Research in Biochemistry. 
Prerequisite Biochemistry 211. 

DENTAL HISTORY AND LITERATURE 

Professor: Foley 

Lit. 121. Oral and Written Communication. (2) 

Second year. A formal course of lectures is given in the second year. Many aspects 
of the instruction are given practical application in the third and fourth years. 
The course has many purposes, all of them contributing to the training of the students 
for effective participation in the extra-practice activities of the profession. Particular 
attention is given to instruction in the functioning of the agencies of communication 
in dentistry: the dental societies and the dental periodicals. The practical phases of 
the course include a thorough study of the preparation and uses of oral and written 
composition by the dental student and the dentist; the use of libraries; the com- 
pilation of bibliographies; the collection, the organization, and the use of information; 
the management of dental meetings; the oral presentation of papers; and professional 
correspondence. 

25 ► 



University of Maryland 

Lit. 141. Thesis. (2) 
Fourth year. 

Lit. 142. Dental History. (I) 

Fourth year. Second semester. Lectures in Dental History describe the beginnings of the 
art of dental practice among ancient civilizations, its advancement in relation to the de- 
velopment of the so-called medical sciences in the early civilizations, its struggle through 
the Middle Ages and, finally, its attainment of recognized professional status in modern 
times. Special attention is given to the forces and stresses that have brought about 
the evolutionary progress from a primitive dental art to a scientific health service 
profession. 

DENTAL PROSTHESIS 

A. Removable Complete and Partial Prosthesis 

Professors: g. w. gaver (head of department) and ramsey. 
Associate Professors: oggesen and warner. 

DRS. GORDON, PRIMROSE, WATSON AND WRIGHT. 

Pros. 11 la. Dental Materials. (4) 

First year. This course is designed to provide the student with a scientific back- 
ground in the nomenclature, composition, physical properties, practical application, 
and proper manipulation of the important materials used in the practice of dentistry, 
excluding drugs and medicinals. 

The theoretical aspect of the course is presented in the form of lectures, demon- 
strations, informal group discussions, and directed supplemental reading. From 
the practical standpoint, the student manipulates and tests the various materials in 
the laboratory, being guided by prepared project sheets. The student develops an 
understanding of these factors: the importance of scientific testing of a material 
before it is used by the profession at large; the realization that every material has 
its limitations, which can be compensated for only by intelligent application and 
manipulation; and an appreciation of the vast field of research open to those who 
wish to improve the materials now available. 

Pros. 112a. Introduction to Complete Denture Prosthesis. (I) 
First year. Second semester. This course is devoted to the manipulation of impression 
compound and the procedures used in developing impressions of edentulous arches, 
casts and bite plates. It embraces a series of lecture-demonstrations designed to give the 
student a knowledge of the essential fundamentals in complete denture construc- 
tion. 

Pros. 121a. Complete Denture Prosthesis. (2) 

Second year. This course is given by lecture-demonstrations on bite registration, tooth 

arrangement, and final finish of complete dentures. 

Pros. 131a. Basic Clinical Complete Denture Prosthesis. (5) 

Third year. The course includes a study of the practical application in the clinic of 

the fundamentals taught in the preceding years. Demonstrations of the various 

< 26 



School of Dentistry 

technics of impression and bite taking are offered to provide the student with addi- 
tional knowledge necessary for clinic work. 

Pros. 133a. Introduction to Removable Partial Denture Prosthesis. (2) 
Third year. Second semester. This lecture-demonstration course embraces all phases 
or removable partial denture construction. Experiments and exercises are arranged 
to give the student the fundamentals in designing, casting and finishing partial den- 
tures. 

Pros. 141a. Advanced Clinical Denture Prosthesis. (4) 

Fourth year. This course consists of the clinical application of the fundamentals 

taught in the previous years. Particular attention is given to a standard method of 

denture construction to equip the student with a basic technic for use in private 

practice. 

B. Fixed Partial Prosthesis 

Professor: nuttall (head of department). 
Associate Professors: dosh, mc lean-lu and oggesen. 
Assistant Professor: willer. 

DRS. M. GRAHAM AND STEELE. 

Pros. 122b. Principles of Fixed Partial Prosthesis. (6) 

Second year. This lecture and laboratory course is designed to provide a background 
of fundamental knowledge in fixed partial denture prosthesis. The interrelations 
of the biological and mechanical aspects of dentistry are emphasized. The prin- 
ciples involved and the procedures used in abutment preparations, the construction 
of fundamental retainers and pontic sections, and the assemblage of fixed bridge 
restorations are presented in detail and correlated with the requirements of occlusion. 
In addition to these procedures, the technics include impressions, wax manipulation, 
pattern construction, investing and casting. 

Pros. 132b. Ceramic and Plastic Pxestorations. (2) 

Third year. First semester. This course presents the uses of porcelain and methyl 
methacrylate as restorative materials. Instruction is given in the procedures of 
preparation, impressions, color selection, temporary protection and cementation. These 
materials are employed in the construction of complete veneer crowns and dowel 
crowns and in staining and glazing technics. 

Pros. 134b. Basic Clinical Fixed Partial Prosthesis. (4) 

Third year. This is a comprehensive course in the essential requirements for the 
successful use of the fixed partial denture. Special consideration is given to funda- 
mental factors in diagnosis, treatment planning and clinical procedures. The course 
integrates biological factors, mechanical principles and esthetic requirements with 
restorative treatment. Emphasis is placed on the physiological considerations as a 
basis for fixed partial denture service. 

Pros. 142b. Advanced Clinical Fixed Partial Prosthesis. (3) 

Fourth year. This course provides clinical training and experience for the student. 

The acquired background of knowledge is utilized in rendering treatment services for 

27 ► 



University of Maryland 

patients. Experience is gained in assessing completely the dental problem, planning 
a practical treatment consistent with the total dental needs and providing services 
which satisfy the objectives of prevention, function and esthetics. 



DIAGNOSIS 

Professor: biddix (head of department). 
Associate Professor: golton. 

DRS. BRYANT, HELDRICH, LEBO AND YENT. 

Diag. 131. Principles of Oral Diagnosis and Treatment Planning. (2) 
Third year. The fundamental principles and procedures in the diagnosis of oral 
and related diseases are studied by intimate clinical observation and discussion of 
interesting cases. The study of the oral cavity through an understanding of its 
relation to other parts of the body is emphasized. By means of consultations with 
other departments the procedures of a comprehensive diagnosis are developed and 
applied in treatment planning. 

Diag. 132. Seminar. 

Third year. The objective of this course is to teach the student to correlate clinical, 
roentgenologic and laboratory findings. Selected patients are presented by both 
medical and dental teachers. 

Diag. 141. Clinical Oral Diagnosis and Treatment Planning. (I) 
fourth year. This course is a continuation of Diagnosis 131 and 132. 

HISTOLOGY 

Professor: provenza (acting head of department). 

MR. JORDAN AND DR. SEIPP. 

Hist. 111. Mammalian Histology and Embryology. (8) 

First year. The course embraces the thorough study of the cells, tissues and organs 
of the various systems of the human body. Although certain aspects of the dental 
histology phase of the course are given strictly as special entities, many are in- 
cluded in the instruction in general histology, since the two areas are so intimately 
related when functional and clinical applications are considered. The instruction in 
embryolooy is correlated with that in histology. It covers the fundamentals of de- 
velopment of the human body, particular emphasis being given to the head and 
facial regions, the oral cavity, and the teeth and their adnexa. Specific correlations 
are also made with the other courses in the dental curriculum. 

For Graduates 

Hist. 212. Mammalian Histology and Embryology. (6) 

This course is the same as Histology 111, except that it does not include the dental 
phases of 111, but does include additional instruction and collateral reading of an 
advanced nature. 

■< 28 



School of Dentistry 

Hist. 213. Mammalian Oral Histology and Embryology. (2) 
Prerequisite, Histology 111 or 212, or an equivalent course. This course covers the 
dental aspects of Histology 111, and includes additional instruction in the relations 
of histologic structure and embryologic development of the teeth, their adnexa, and 
the head and facial regions of the human body. 

Hist. 214. Research in Histology. 
Number of hours and credit by arrangement. 

Hist. 215. Research in Embryology. 
Number of hours and credit by arrangement. 

MEDICINE 
A. General Medicine 
Associate Professor: mc lean. 

DRS. FRAVEL, LEONARD AND OGDEN. 

Med. 121a. First Aid. 

Second year. Second semester. In this course the student is instructed in the basic 

principles of first aid. 

Med. 132a. Principles of Medicine. (2) 

Third year. The course is taught by lectures, visual aids and x-ray demonstrations 

of diseases of the cardio-respiratory, gastro-intestinal, genitourinary and nervous 

systems. 

Med. 141a. Physical Diagnosis. (I) 

Fourth year. First semester. Slides and clinical demonstrations are used to show the 
methods of recognition of important objective signs as they relate to body disturb- 
ances. The methods of taking blood pressure and its significance, also the recognition 
and treatment of medical emergencies, are taught. 

Med. 142a. Principles of Medicine. (2) 

Fourth year. Throughout the year the entire class is taken into the hospital for medical 
clinics where the close application of medical and dental knowledge in history taking, 
diagnosis, laboratory procedures and treatment is emphasized. 

Med. 143a. Preventive and Public Health Dentistry. (I) 

Fourth year. Second semester. The objectives of this course are to emphasize those 
measures other than remedial operations that will tend to minimize the occurrence or 
the extension of oral disease, and to outline the status of dentistry in the field of gen- 
eral public health. The relations of dentistry with other phases of public health are 
discussed, as are the problems affecting the administration of dental health programs. 
Special effort is made to demonstrate methods and materials suitable for use in dental 
health education programs. 

Med. 144a. Clinical Conferences. 

Fourth year. Throughout the year small groups of students are taken into the hospital 

for medical ward rounds, demonstrations and discussions. 

29 ► 



University of Maryland 

B. Oral Medicine 
Assistant Professor: abramson. 

DRS. T. F. CLEMENT, J. P. NORMS AND J. M. FOLEY. 

Med. 121b. Principles of Endodontics. (I) 

Second year. The lecture phase presents the fundamentals necessary for endodontic 

procedures; the indications and contraindications for these procedures; the methods 

used in performing the necessary steps to preserve the functions of the teeth and to 

maintain the health of the individual. The laboratory phase is designed to teach the 

student the materials, the instrumentation, and the techniques employed in endodontic 

treatment. 

Med. 122b. Introduction to Periodontics. (I) 

Second year. The lectures place special emphasis on the importance of oral hygiene 
and its relation to the prevention of all dental disorders. The causes, results, and 
treatment of unhygienic conditions of the oral cavity are fully considered. Demon- 
strations are given in the prophylactic treatment of the mouth and in the accepted 
methods of tooth brushing to be used in home care. In the laboratory the student 
learns on special manikins the use of the periodontal instruments. By progressive 
exercises and drills he is taught the basic principles of good operating procedure and 
the methods of thorough prophylactic treatment. 

Med. 131b. Basic Clinical Endodontics. (I) 

Third year. During the Junior year, the student applies the fundamentals he has 

learned by performing endodontic procedures on clinical cases. 

Med. 132b. Basic Clinical Periodontics. (I) 

Third year. The lectures present the etiology, clinical symptoms, diagnosis, prognosis, 
and methods of treatment of the various forms of periodontal disease, other diseases 
of the oral cavity, and lesions of the lips, cheeks, and tongue. The recognition of 
periodontal disease in its incipient forms and the importance of early treatment are 
stressed. The lectures are well illustrated by color slides, moving pictures, and other 
visual aids. The Junior student is required to apply the fundamentals he has learned 
by performing periodontal procedures on a prescribed number of clinical cases. 

Med. 141b. Advanced Clinical Endodontics. (I) 

Fourth year. During his Senior year the student performs the more advanced endodontic 

procedures on clinical cases. 

Med. 142b. Advanced Clinical Periodontics. (I) 

Fourth year. The Senior student performs the periodontal procedures on clinical 

patients exhibiting the more advanced periodontal problems. 

MICROBIOLOGY 

Professor: shay (head of department). 

MR. BECKER. 

Microbiol. 121. Dental Microbiology and Immunology. (4) 

Second year. First semester. The course embraces lectures, laboratory, demonstra- 

^ 30 






School of Dentistry 

tions, recitations, and group conferences, augmented by guided reading. Practical and 
theoretical consideration is given to pathogenic bacteria, viruses, yeasts and molds. 
Special attention is given to those organisms which cause lesions in and about the 
oral cavity, particularly primary focal infections about the teeth, tonsils, etc., which 
result in the establishment of secondary foci. Immunological and serological prin- 
ciples are studied, with special consideration being given to hypersensitivity resulting 
from the use of antibiotics, vaccines, antigens, and other therapeutic agents. 

Laboratory teaching includes the methods of staining and the cultural charac- 
teristics of microorganisms; their reaction to disinfectants, antiseptics, and germicides; 
methods of sterilization and asepsis; animal inoculation; preparation of sera, vaccines, 
and antitoxins; a study of antibiotics; and a demonstration of virus techniques. In all 
phases of the course emphasis is placed on dental applications. 

For Graduates 

Microbiol 200, 201. Chemotherapy. (J -2) 

Prerequisite Microbiology 121 or equivalent. One lecture a week. Offered in alter- 
nate years. A study of the chemistry, toxicity, pharmacology and therapeutic value of 
drugs employed in the treatment of disease. 

Microbiol. 202, 203. Reagents and Media. (I, J) 

One lecture a week. Offered in alternate years. A study of the methods of prep- 
aration and use of bacteriological reagents and media. 

Microbiol. 210. Special Problems in Microbiology. 

Credit determined by amount and quality of work performed. Laboratory course. 

Microbiol. 211. Public Health. (1-2) 

Prerequisite Microbiology 121 or equivalent. Lectures and discussions on the or- 
ganization and administration of state and municipal health departments and private 
health agencies. The course also includes a study of laboratory methods. 

Microhol. 339. Research in Microbiology. 

Credit determined by amount and quality of work performed. 

OPERATIVE DENTISTRY 

Professor: Medina (acting head of department). 

Associate Professor: louie. 

Assistant Professors: h. m. clement, c. gaver and edmond g. vanden bosche. 

DRS. BEAVEN, BIANCO, DIAZ, LEVIN AND VELTRE. 

Oper. 121. Fundamentals of Operative Dentistry. (5) 

Second year. The student is trained in the technical procedures of cavity prepara- 
tion and the manipulation of the restorative materials employed in the treatment of 
diseases and injuries of the tooth structure. These basic principles are applied on 
composition teeth and extracted natural teeth. Instruction includes twenty-six lectures 
and forty-eight three-hour laboratory periods. 

31 ► 



University of Maryland 

Oper. 131. Basic Clinical Operative Dentistry. (4) 

Third year. This course is a continuing development of the fundamentals taught in 
Operative 121. The objective is to present the additional information which is 
necessary for the management of practical cases. Instruction includes lectures, 
demonstrations and clinical practice in which the student treats patients under the 
individual guidance of staff members. 

Oper. 141. Advanced Clinical Operative Dentistry. (6) 

Fourth year. With the background provided by Operative 121 and 131, the student 
is able to comprehend and apply the procedures for treating the more complicated 
operative problems. The objectives of this course are to instruct the student in the 
different procedures by which a comprehensive operative service can be rendered 
and to acquaint him with as many unusual clinical cases as possible. Instruction 
includes lectures, demonstrations, and clinical practice. 

ORTHODONTICS 

Professor: preis (head of department). 
Assistant Professors: kress, shehan and swinehart. 

DR. CULLEN. 

Ortho. 131. Principles of Orthodontics. (2) 

Third year. The course consists of lectures supplemented by slides and motion pic- 
tures. The subject matter includes the history of orthodontics and the study of 
growth and development, evolution of human dental occlusion, forces of occlusion, 
etiology of malocclusion, aberrations of the maxilla and mandible which affect occlu- 
sion, and tissue changes incident to tooth movement. 

Ortho. 141. Clinical Orthodontics. (I) 

Fourth year. Students are assigned in small groups to the Clinic where patients are 
given a thorough dental examination. Under the direction of an instructor each case 
is diagnosed, methods of procedure are explained, and treatment planning is out- 
lined. In the more simple cases therapy is undertaken by the students under the 
supervision of an instructor. Students, therefore, have the opportunity of applying 
clinically the knowledge which they received during their Junior year. 

PATHOLOGY 

Professor: m. s. aisenberg (head of department). 
Associate Professors: Gardner and Weinberg. 
Assistant Professor: a. d. aisenberg. 

DR. GRANRUTH. 

Path. 121. General Pathology. (4) 

Second year. Second semester. The general principles of disease processes and tissue 
reactions, both gross and microscopic, are taught with the objectives of training the 
student to recognize and be familiar with the abnormal and of creating a foundation 
for further study in the allied sciences. Emphasis is placed upon those diseases in 
the treatment of which medicodental relationships are to be encountered. 

^ 32 



School of Dentistry 

Path. 131. Oral Pathology. (3) 

Third year. First semester. The course includes a study o£ the etiology and the 
gross and microscopic manifestations of diseases of the teeth and their investing 
structures: pathologic dentition, dental anomalies, periodontal diseases, calcific de- 
posits, dental caries, pulpal diseases, dentoalveolar abscesses, oral manifestations of 
svstemic diseases, cysts of the jaws, and benign and malignant lesions in and about 
the oral cavity. 

Path. 141. Seminar. 

Fourth year. This constitutes a part of the cancer teaching program sponsored by a 
grant from the United States Public Health Service. It is conducted by visiting lec- 
turers who are specialists in their respective fields. 

For Graduates 

Path. 211. Advanced Oral Pathology. (8) 

Two lectures and two laboratory periods throughout the year. This course is pre- 
sented* with the objective of correlating a knowledge of histopathology with the 
various aspects of clinical practice. Studies of surgical and biopsy specimens are 
stressed. 

Path. 212. Research. 

Time and credit by arrangement. Research in areas of particular interest to the 

student. 

PEDODONTICS 

Associate Professor: sanders. 
Assistant Professor: ehrlich. 

DRS. FERLITA AND KIHN. 

Ped. 121. Technics of Pedodontics. (I) 

Second year. Second semester. This laboratory course in dentistry for children 
consists of sixteen laboratory periods. Demonstrations and visual aids are utilized to 
augment the teaching procedure. The work is performed on model teeth in primary 
dentoforms and consists of exercises in cavity preparation in primary teeth for the 
proper reception of different restorative materials, in the technic of restoring a frac- 
tured young permanent anterior tooth, and in the construction of a basic type of 
space maintainer. 

Ped. 131. Clinical Pedodontics. (I) 

Third year. The student is introduced to clinical dentistry for children. He utilizes 
the technical procedures learned in the laboratory. Didactic instruction includes 
sixteen lectures offered during the first semester. Emphasis is given to the manage- 
ment of the child patient with necessary modifications for behavior problems. The 
indications and contraindications for pulpal therapy are evaluated for the purpose 
of rational tooth conservation. Oral hygiene, roentgenology, growth and develop- 
ment, and caries susceptibility tests are taught. Training in preventive orthodontics 
is given for true denture guidance and to allow the student to institute interceptive 
or early remedial measures in incipient deformities. 

33 ► 



University of Maryland 

The Department endeavors to develop in the student a comprehensive interest 
in guiding the child patient through the period of the mixed dentition. A separate 
clinic, equipped with child-size chairs and supervised by the pedodontics staff, pro- 
vides adequate opportunity for clinical applications of the methods taught in labora- 
tory and lectures. 

Ped. 141. Clinical Pedodontics. (J) 

Fourth year. The student continues his clinical training throughout the year and is 

assigned the more difficult cases. 

PHARMACOLOGY 

Professor: dobbs (head of department) 
Assistant Professor: ross. 

DR. DOLLE. 

Pharmacol. 131. General Pharmacology and Therapeutics. (4) 
Third year. The course is designed to provide a general survey of pharmacology, 
affording the students the necessary knowledge for the practice of rational therapeutics. 
The course is taught by lectures, laboratory and demonstrations. The first semester 
consists of sixteen hours of didactic work including instruction in the sites and modes 
of drug action, prescription writing, and the pharmacodynamics and therapeutics 
of the local-acting drugs. The second semester consists of thirty-two hours of didactics 
and forty-eight hours of laboratory instruction. The laboratory experiments are per- 
formed by students on animals and are designed to demonstrate the direct effects of 
drugs on vital tissues. The subject material consists of the pharmacodynamics of the 
systemic-acting drugs and the anti-infective agents. In the therapeutics phase the 
students are instructed in the use of drugs for the prevention, treatment, and correction 
of general and oral diseases. 

Pharmacol. 141. Oral Therapeutics. (I) 

Fourth year. First semester. This course consists of sixteen hours of lectures and 
demonstrations. It is designed to acquaint the students with the practical applications 
of pharmacology in the treatment of dental and oral diseases. Particular emphasis is 
given to the newer drugs and the more recent advances in therapeutics. Patients from 
the dental clinics and the hospital are used for demonstrations whenever possible. 
A correlation of theory with clinical practice is obtained by chairside instruction on 
patients in the dental clinic. 

Pharmacol. 142. Nutritional Therapeutics. (I) 

Fourth year. First semester. This course consists of sixteen hours of lectures and 
demonstrations devoted to the principles and practices of nutritional therapeutics. The 
presentation includes a study of the dietary requirements of essential food substances 
in health and disease. The vitamin and mineral deficiency states with their pathology 
and symptomatology are presented with suggestions for dietary and drug therapy. 
Metabolic diseases are discussed, and their effects on the nutritional states are con- 
sidered. Students are taught to plan diets for patients with various nutritional prob- 
lems, such as those resulting from loss of teeth, the use of new dental appliances, 
dental caries, stomatitis, cellulitis, osteomyelitis, and bone fractures. A project study 
is made by each student which includes analyses of his basal metabolic requirement, 
his total energy requirement, and his dietary intake in relation to his daily needs. 

^ 34 



School of Dentistry 

PHYSIOLOGY 

Professor: oster (head of department). 
Associate Professors: shipley and pollack. 

MRS. STALING. 

Physiol. 121. Principles of Physiology. (6) 

Second year. A fundamental objective of this course is to achieve an integration of 

basic scientific phenomena of function as they relate to the organism as a whole. 

Lectures deal with the principal fields of physiology, including heart and circula- 
tion, peripheral and central nervous functions, respiration, digestion, muscular ac- 
tivity, hepatic and renal functions, water and electrolyte balance, special senses, gen- 
eral and cellular metabolism, endocrines and reproduction. In the laboratory work 
(first semester) the classic experiments on frog and turtle muscle and heart function 
are followed by more advanced work on rabbits, cats, dogs and the students them- 
selves. A special series of lectures is devoted to the application of basic physiologic 
principles to human clinical problems. 

For Graduates 

Physiol. 211. Principles of Mammalian Physiology. (6) 

Prerequisite permission from the department. Same as course 121 but with collateral 
reading and additional instruction. 

Physiol. 212. Advanced Physiology. 

Hours and credit by arrangement. Lectures and seminars during the second semes- 
ter. 

Physiol. 223. Research. 

Hours and credits by arrangement. 

PRACTICE ADMINISTRATION 

Professor: biddix. 

DR. LOVETT AND MR. o'dONNELL. 

Pract. Adm. 141. Principles of Administration. (I) 

Fourth year. Second semester. The objective of this course is to prepare students to 
assume the social, economic and professional responsibilities of dental practice. The 
lectures embrace the selection of the office location and office equipment, the basis 
of determining fees, the methods of collecting accounts, the use of auxiliary personnel, 
and the choice of various types of insurance and investments. A comprehensive 
bookkeeping system for a dental office is explained. 

Pract. Adm. 142. Ethics. (I) 

Fourth year. First semester. The course includes lectures on general ethics and 
its basic teachings, and an interpretation of the philosophical principles adopted by 
the American Dental Association and embodied in its "Principles of Ethics." 

35 ► 



University of Maryland 

Pract. Adm. 143. Jurisprudence. (I) 

Fourth year. First semester. The objective o£ the course is to acquaint the dental 
student with the fundamentals of law as they relate to the dentist and to his patients. 
The sources of law, the types of courts and court procedures are explained; the 
student is acquainted with the special statutory provisions pertaining to the regula- 
tion of the practice of dentistry, as well as the dentist's responsibilities under the 
criminal law. The respective rights and liabilities of both the dentist and his patients 
are considered in lectures dealing with contracts and torts; practical illustrations of 
these rights and liabilities are reviewed in the light of actual reported cases in the 



courts. 



ROENTGENOLOGY 



Professor: biddix. 

DRS. KLEIN AND SMITH. 



Roentgenol. 131. Principles of Dental Roentgenology. (2) 

Third year. The lectures include a study of the physical principles involved in the 
production of x-rays and a discussion of their properties and effects, the hazards of 
roentgenography to both operator and patient, the technics of taking roentgenograms, 
and the processing of the films. The conference periods deal with the roentgeno- 
graphic study of the normal anatomic structures in health and the variations noted 
under various pathologic conditions. 

Roentgenol. 132. Introduction to Clinical Dental Roentgenology. 
Third year. Second semester. The division of the class into small groups permits 
individual* supervision in the clinical application of the material presented in Roent- 
genol. 131. Under guidance the student learns to correctly place, expose and process 
the film and mount a full series of dental roentgenograms. 

Roentgenol. 141. Clinical Dental Roentgenology. Q) 

Fourth year. Under a system of rotating assignments students are placed in constant 
association with the routine practical use of the roentgen ray. They are required to 
master the fundamental scientific principles and to acquire technical skill in taking, 
processing, and interpreting all types of intraoral and extraoral films. 

SURGERY 

Professors: dorsey (head of department), helrich, robinson and yeager. 
Associate Professor: cappuccio. 
Assistant Professors: siwinski and inman. 

DRS. HEMPHILL AND JOHNSON. 

Surg. 131. Anesthesiology. (2) 

Third year. Local anesthesia is taught in both principle and practice. In lectures 
and clinics all types of intraoral, extraoral, conduction and infiltration injections; 
the anatomical relation of muscles and nerves; the theory of action of anesthetic 
agents and their toxic manifestations are taught. Demonstrations are given in con- 
duction and infiltration technics; students give injections under supervision of an 

M 36 



School of Dentistry 

instructor. General anesthesia is taught in lectures and clinic demonstrations. The 
action of the anesthetic agents, methods of administration, indications and contra- 
indications, and the treatment of toxic manifestations are included. Demonstrations 
are given in the preparation of the patient, the administration of all general anes- 
thetics (inhalant, rectal, spinal, and intravenous), and the technics for oral opera- 
tions. Clinics are held in the Department of Oral Surgery in the Dental School and 
in the Hospital. 

Surg. 132. Oral Surgery. (3) 

Third year. The course consists of lectures on the principles of surgery, the classifica- 
tion of teeth for extraction, and the pre- and postoperative treatment of ambulatory 
patients. The student is assigned to the Department of Oral Surgery on a rotating 
schedule and is required to produce local anesthesia and extract teeth under the 
supervision of an instructor. 

Surg. 141. Oral Surgery. (3) 

Fourth year. This course consists of lectures, clinical assignments, and practical 
demonstrations on the etiology, pathology, diagnosis and treatment of all classes of 
tumors, infections, deformities, anomalies, impacted teeth, fractures and surgical 
problems associated with the practice of dentistry. Hospital clinics, demonstrations 
and ward rounds are given to familiarize the student with abnormal conditions inci- 
dent to the field of his future operations and to train him thoroughly in the diagnosis 
of benign and malignant tumors. Weekly seminars are held in the Hospital. 

For Graduates 

Surg. 201. Clinical Anesthesiology. (6) 
Forty hours a week for thirteen weeks. 

Surg. 220. General Dental Oral Surgery. (4) 

Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week for one semester. 

Surg. 221. Advanced Oral Surgery. (4) 

Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week for one semester. 

Surg. 222. Research. 

Time and credit by arrangement. 

VISUAL AIDS IN TEACHING 

MR. TAYLOR AND STAFF. 

The Department of Visual Aids employs the latest photographic technics 
and equipment for the production of both monochromatic and full-color still 
and motion pictures. By cooperation with other departments new material is 
developed for lectures, clinics, publications and exhibits. 

Through photography the School retains for teaching purposes interesting 
cases that appear in the clinics, preserves evidence of unusual pathological 
cases, and records anatomical anomalies, facial disharmonies and malocclusions 

37 ► 



University of Maryland 

of the teeth. In addition the student, through his contact with photographic 
uses, becomes acquainted with the value of photography in clinical practice. 
Students are advised as to the use of visual aids in the preparation of lectures 
and theses, the arrangement and co-ordination of materials, and the organiza- 
tion and maintenance of records and histories. 

Various art media and the use of modern plastics supplement photography. 
By the combination and correlation of these methods all departments are pro- 
vided with an unlimited supply of valuable and often irreplaceable visual 
aids. 

A closed circuit television system is used to enable large groups to visualize 
clinical and laboratory procedures. Close-up pictures of the various operations 
are made possible for comfortable viewing in lecture hall and laboratory. 

SPECIAL COURSES 
Summer Courses 

As the need arises, summer courses may be offered in certain subjects in- 
cluded in the regular curriculum. A charge of $12.00 for each semester hour 
credit is made for these courses. 



The Gorgas Odontological Society 

The Gorgas Odontological Society was organized in 1916 as an honorary 
student dental society with scholarship as a basis for admission. The Society 
was named after Dr. Ferdinand J. S. Gorgas, a pioneer in dental education, a 
teacher of many years' experience, and during his life a great contributor to 
dental literature. It was with the idea of perpetuating his name that the 
Society adopted it. 

To be eligible for membership a student must be in the first 30 per cent of 
his class. The selection of this 30 per cent shall be based on the weighted 
percentage average system as outlined in the school regulations. The meetings, 
held once each month, are addressed by prominent dental and medical men, an 
effort being made to obtain speakers not connected with the University. The 
members have an opportunity, even while students, to hear men associated with 
other educational institutions. 

Omicron Kayfa Ufsilon 

Phi Chapter of Omicron Kappa Upsilon, honorary dental society, was char- 
tered at the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, University of 
Maryland during the session of 1928-29. Membership in the society is 
awarded to a number not exceeding 12 per cent of the graduating class. This 

* 38 



School of Dentistry 



honor is conferred upon students who through their professional course of 
study creditably fulfill all obligations as students, and whose conduct, earnest- 
ness, evidence of good character and high scholarship recommend them to 
election. 

The following graduates of the 1959 Class were elected to membership: 



Kenneth David Bass 
Barbara Dorothea Bucko 
Frank Anthony Dolle 
Frank Walter Krause 
John Viering Raese 
Matthew Angelo Rocco 
Louis Joseph Ruland, Jr. 



Jerome Schwartz 

Robert Bernard Silberstein 

Charles Carroll Swoope, Jr. 

Francis Anthony Veltre 

Jorge Vendrell 

Gorm von Pultz-Hansen 



Alumni Association 

The first annual meeting of the Society of the Alumni of the Baltimore 
College of Dental Surgery was held in Baltimore, March 1, 1849. This organi- 
zation has continued in existence to the present, its name having been changed 
to The National Alumni Association of the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, 
Dental School, University of Maryland. 

The officers of the Alumni Association for 1959-60 are as follows: 



President 
Harry W. Dressel, Jr. 

6340 Frederick Avenue 
Baltimore 28, Maryland 

First Vice-President 
William F. Decesare 

216 Broadway 
Providence, Rhode Island 

Past President 

Ex-Officio 

Edwin G. Gail 

3700 N. Charles Street 

Baltimore 18, Maryland 

Treasurer 
Howard Van Natta 
Medical Arts Building 
Baltimore 1, Maryland 



President Elect 

Daniel F. Lynch 

1678 Primrose Road 

Washington 12, D. C. 

Second Vice-President 
James E. John 

804 Medical Arts Building 
Roanoke, Virginia 

Secretary 

Joseph P. Cappuccio 

1010 St. Paul Street 

Baltimore 2, Maryland 

Editor 

Kyrle W. Preis 

700 Cathedral Street 

Baltimore 1, Maryland 



Historian-Librarian 

Milton B. Asbell 

25 Haddon Avenue 

Camden 3, New Jersey 



39 



University of Maryland 

University Alumni Council Representatives 

Eugene D. Lyon, 1960 Samuel H. Bryant, 1961 

Baltimore, Maryland Baltimore, Maryland 

Harry Levin, 1962 

Baltimore, Maryland 

Executive Council 
Harry W. F. Dressel Kyrle W. Preis 

Baltimore, Maryland Baltimore, Maryland 

Howard Van Natta Edwin G. Gail 

Baltimore, Maryland Baltimore, Maryland 

Joseph P. Cappuccio William F. Decesare 

Baltimore, Maryland Providence, Rhode Island 

Daniel F. Lynch James E. John 

Washington, D. C. Roanoke, Virginia 

Milton B. Asbell 
Camden, New Jersey 

ELECTED MEMBERS 

Executive Council 

Calvin J. Gaver Melvin Hazen Colvin 

Baltimore, Maryland Washington, D. C 

William B. Mehring L. Lynn Emmart 

Silver Spring, Maryland Baltimore, Maryland 

Philip L. Block Philip J. Norris 

Baltimore, Maryland Baltimore, Maryland 

ENDOWMENT FUND 

TRUSTEES EX-OFE1C10 

Harry W. F. Dressel, Jr., President 

Daniel F. Lynch, President-Elect 

Joseph P. Cappuccio, Secretary 

Howard Van Natta, Treasurer 

Myron S. Aisenberg, Dean 

ELECTED TRUSTEES 

Lawrence W. Bimestefer, 1960 Edward C. Morin, 1960 

Baltimore, Maryland Pawtucket, Rhode Island 

James W. McCarl, 1961 William Paul Hoffman, 1961 

Greenbelt, Maryland Washington, D. C. 

Ashur G. Chavoor, 1962 Arthur I. Bell, 1962 

Washington, D. C. Baltimore, Maryland 

M 40 



School of Dentistry 

SENIOR PRIZE AWARDS 

The following prizes were awarded to members of the Senior Class for the 
1958-59 Session: 

The Alexander H. Pater soft Memorial Medal 
For Practical Set of Fidl Upper and Lower Dentures 

FRANK WALTER KRAUSE 
Honorable Mention Edgar C. White 

The Isaac H. Davis Memorial Medal 

(Contributed by Dr. Leonard I. Davis) 

For Cohesive Gold Filling 

FRANK WALTER KRAUSE 
Honorable Mention Ivan Orlo Gardner 

The Alumni Association Medal 
For Thesis 

CHARLES CARROLL SWOOPE, JR. 

Honorable Mention Kenneth David Bass and Ivan Orlo Gardner 

The Harry E. Kelsey Award 

(Contributed by former associates of Dr. Kelsey: 

Drs. Anderson, Devlin, Hodges, Johnston and Preis) 

For Professional Demeanor 

FRANK ANTHONY DOLLE 

The Harry E. Latcham Memorial Medal 
For Complete Oral Operative Restoration 

JEFFRY CHANDLER PENNINGTON 
Honorable Mention Richard Lawrence Fraze 

The Edgar J. Jacques Memorial Award 
For Meritorious Work in Practical Oral Surgery 

CHESTER JAMES RICHMOND, JR. 

The Herbert Friedherg Memorial Award 

(Contributed by the New Jersey Alumni Chapter of the 

National Alumni Association) 

For Achievement by a New Jersey Sefiior 

CHARLES CARROLL SWOOPE, JR. 

The Sigma Epsilon Delta Memorial Medal 
For Highest Average in Basic Sciences 

CHARLES CARROLL SWOOPE, JR. 

41 ► 



University of Maryland 

Graduating Class 
1958-1959 Session 

Kenneth David Bass, B.A., University of Connecticut, 1953; 

M.S., 1955 Connecticut 

Robert Gene Beckelheimer, Concord College West Virginia 

Frederick Blumenthal, University of Miami Florida 

Martin David Breckstein, University of Florida Florida 

Lawrence Austin Brehne, B.A., Rutgers University, 1951 New Jersey 

Robert Francis Bristol, B.A., Providence College, 1955 Rhode Island 

Bayard Allen Buchen, Emory University Florida 

Robert Rolland Buckner, Washington Missionary College Georgia 

Barbara Dorothea Bucko, B.A., Syracuse University Connecticut 

Thomas Cali, B.S., University of Maryland, 1955 New Jersey 

John Joseph Cartisano, Indiana University New York 

Gary Herbert Cohen, University of Maryland Maryland 

Robert Ted Conner, West Virginia University West Virginia 

Juan Anibal Cuevas-Jimenez, B.S., University of Puerto Rico, 1953 

Puerto Rico 

Adolph Albert Cura, B.A., Boston College, 1955 Massachusetts 

Peter Bernard DalPozzol, Colby College Connecticut 

Allan Lee Danoff, University of Maryland, B.S., 1957 Maryland 

Eugene Frederick deLonge, Newberry College South Carolina 

Joseph Budding Dietz, Jr., Lehigh University Delaware 

Frank Anthonv Dolle, B.S., University of Maryland, 1948; M.S., 

1950; Ph.D., 1954 Maryland 

William Frank Dombrowski, B.S., United States Naval Academy, 1950 

Maryland 
James Francis Dooley, B.S., United States Merchant Marine Academy, 

1950; A.B., Rutgers University, 1951 New Jersey 

William Edward Dowden, B.S., Niagara University, 1955 New York 

Conrad Castenzio Ferlita, B.S., University of Miami Florida 

Raymond Alan Flanders, Colgate University New York 

John Morrison Foley, B.S., Loyola College, 1955 Maryland 

James Arthur Fowler, Jr., University of Maryland, B.S., 1957 Maryland 

Robert Donald Fraser, B.S., Niagara University, 1955 New York 

Richard Lawrence Fraze, Tufts College Florida 

Larry Joe Frick, The Clemson Agricultural College South Carolina 

Thornwell Jacobs Frick, B.S., Davidson College, 1955 South Carolina 

Orton Dittmar Frisbie, University of Florida Florida 

Ivan Orlo Gardner, B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1952 Maryland 

Billy Wade Gaskill, West Virginia University Arkansas 

Frederick Lewis Hodous, University of Maryland Maryland 

Francis Kurt Hugelmeyer, B.S., College of the Holy Cross, 1955. . . .New York 

Eugene Farley Humphreys, Brigham Young University Idaho 

James Paul Jabbour, B.S., Tufts College, 1950; Ed.M., 1951 Massachusetts 

^ 42 



School of Dentistry 

Calvin Charles Kay, University of Miami Florida 

Edward Gerard Keen, St. Anselm's College Connecticut 

Paul Lewis Keener, University of Maryland Maryland 

Joseph Krall, B.S., University of Maryland, 1948 Maryland 

Jacob Ian Krampf, University of Maryland, B.S., 1957 Maryland 

Frank Walter Krause, B.A., University of Virginia, 1955 New Jersey 

Domenic Edward LaPorta, University of Maryland, B.S., 1957 Connecticut 

Robert Louis Lee, University of Maryland Maryland 

Wallace George Lee, University of Maryland, B.S., 1953 Michigan 

Lester Leonard Levin, University of Maryland Maryland 

Leslie Herminio Lopez-Velez, B.S., University of Puerto Rico, 1955 

Puerto Rico 

Joseph Paul Lynch, B.S., Seton Hall University, 1953 New Jersey 

Carlos A. Machuca-Padin, B.S., University of Puerto Rico, 1954. . . .Puerto Rico 

Arnold Irwin Malhmood, University of Maryland, B.S., 1959 Maryland 

Jose Manuel Martinez, B.S., University of Puerto Rico, 1955 Puerto Rico 

John Kenneth McDonald, Louisiana State University and Agricultural 

and Mechanical College Mississippi 

Thomas James Meakem, Jr., Davis and Elkins College New Jersey 

Thomas Eugene Miller, B.S., St. John's University, 1955 New Jersey 

Bernard Lee Morgan, B.A., West Virginia University, 1955.... West Virginia 

Fabian Morgan, B.S., Wake Forest College, 1954 North Carolina 

John Worthington Myers, B.S., University of Maryland, 1957 Maryland 

Elizabeth Haydee Noa, B.A., Nazareth College, 1954 Puerto Rico 

William Barnard O'Connor, West Virginia University West Virginia 

William Robert Owens, B.S., Davidson College, 1954 North Carolina 

JefTry Chandler Pennington, The Citadel . South Carolina 

Charles Kenneth Peters, Jr., B.S., Loyola College, 1954 Maryland 

Gregory Michael Petrakis, B.S., Trinity College, 1955 Connecticut 

George Jackson Phillips, Jr., B.A., Amherst College, 1955 Maryland 

Barry Pickus, B.A., Western Maryland College, 1955 Maryland 

Donald Alan Pirie, B.S., University of Maryland, 1955 Maryland 

Anthony Michael Policastro, B.A., Seton Hall University, 1955. . . .New Jersey 

Joseph Eul Polino, B.A., Providence College, 1955 Connecticut 

Alben R. Pollack, B.A., Alfred University, 1955 New York 

Joel Pollack, B.S., The City College of New York, 1955 New York 

Albert Edward Postal, University of Maryland District of Columbia 

William Lewis Pralley, B.A., West Virginia University, 1955... West Virginia 

John Viering Raese, West Virginia University West Virginia 

William Paul Raimond, University of Maryland Maryland 

Burton Alvin Raphael, B.S., University of Maryland, 1957 Maryland 

Harold Reuben Ribakow, University of Maryland Maryland 

Chester James Richmond, Jr., Tufts College Connecticut 

Matthew Angelo Rocco, B.A., Seton Hall University, 1955 New Jersey 

Lawrence David Rogers, University of Maryland, B.S., 1957 Maryland 

Everett Newton Roush, III, Marshall College West Virginia 

43 ► 



University of Maryland 

Louis Joseph Ruland, Jr., B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1955 

Maryland 

Raymond Richard Sahley, Marshall College West Virginia 

Charles Salerno, Upsala College New Jersey 

Richard Charles Saville, B.A., University of Maryland, 1955 Maryland 

David Lee Schofield, University of Miami Florida 

Jerome Schwartz, B.S., University of Maryland, 1949 Maryland 

Robert Bernard Silberstein, University of Florida Florida 

Stanley Leonard Silver, B.S., University of Maryland, 1953 

District of Columbia 

Francis Vincent Simansky, B.S., Loyola College, 1955 Maryland 

Orlando Louis Skaff, B.A., West Virginia University, 1955 West Virginia 

Philip Smith, University of Vermont and State Agricultural College. .Vermont 

Anthony Sollazzo, Rutgers University New Jersey 

James Frederick Sproul, West Virginia University Ohio 

John Joseph Stecher, B.S., Seton Hall University, 1952 New Jersey 

Donald Dietrich Stegman, B.S., University of Maryland, 1952 Maryland 

Daniel Joseph Sullivan, B.A., Providence College, 1955 Rhode Island 

Charles Carroll Swoope, Jr., University of Florida New Jersey 

Arthur Morton Tilles, University of Maryland Maryland 

John Louis Varanelli, University of Connecticut Connecticut 

Francis Anthony Veltre, B.S., University of Maryland, 1952; 

M.S., 1954 .Maryland 

Jorge Vendrell, Tulane University of Louisiana Puerto Rico 

Gorm von Pultz-Hansen, B.S., University of Maryland, 1957 Maryland 

Leonard Clifford Warner, Jr., Colby College Connecticut 

Edgar Clair White, Marshall College Kentucky 

Thomas Adams Wilson, B.A., Amherst College, 1955 Maryland 

Herbert Sanford Yampolsky, B.S., University of Alabama, 1955. . . .New Jersey 

Honors 

University Gold Medal for Scholarship, Summa Cum Laude 

Awarded to 

Charles Carroll Swoope, Jr. 

Certificates of Honor, Magna Cum Laude 

Awarded to 

Frank Anthony Dolle Gorm von Pultz-Hansen 

Barbara Dorothea Bucko Matthew Angelo Rocco 

Jerome Schwartz 

Cum Laude 
Kenneth David Bass Frank Walter Krause 

Robert Bernard Silberstein John Viering Raese 

Jorge Vendrell Francis Anthony Veltre 

Louis Joseph Ruland, Jr. 

M 44 



School of Dentistry 

REGISTER OF STUDENTS 

1959-1960 Session 

Senior Class 

Joel Martin Adler, Emory University Mississippi 

Earl Robert Alban, Jr., B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1954. . .Maryland 

John Jacob Atchinson, Marshall College West Virginia 

Edmund Donald Baron, Rutgers University New Jersey 

Hulon Edward Beasley, University of Florida Maryland 

John William Biehn, University of Maryland Maryland 

Raymond Cline Bodley, West Virginia University West Virginia 

William Francis Brady, Jr., B.S., Boston College, 1954; M.S., 

University of Massachusetts, 1956 Massachusetts 

Frank Lee Bragg, West Virginia University West Virginia 

James Peter Brown, B.A., American International College, 1956. .Massachusetts 

Rolla Ray Burk, Jr., A.B., West Virginia University, 1951 West Virginia 

Gene Edward Camp, West Virginia University West Virginia 

Alfred Chesler, Furman University Ohio 

Robert Roy Chesney, Western Maryland College Maryland 

Robert A. Cialone, B.S., University of Maryland, 1955 New Jersey 

William John Cimikoski, A.B., University of Michigan, 1953 ... .Connecticut 

Milton Chipman Clegg, B.A., University of Utah, 1956 Utah 

Clyde Albert Coe, University of Maryland Maryland 

Blanca Collazo, B.S., University of Puerto Rico, 1956 Puerto Rico 

Frank Lateau Collins, West Virginia University West Virginia 

Myron Harris Coulton, University of Florida Florida 

Thomas Joseph Cronin, B.S., De Paul University, 1955 New Jersey 

William Walter Cwiek, B.S., University of Maryland, 1953 Maryland 

Charles Albert Darby, University of Maryland Maryland 

Charles Albert Dean, B.A., Providence College, 1956 Massachusetts 

John Jay Denson, Jr., B.S., University of Florida, 1956 Florida 

Michael Vincent Doran, Jr., B.S., University of Miami, 1956 Virginia 

Raymond Dzoba, Bowling Green State University New Jersey 

Morton Mayer Ehudin, University of Maryland, B.S., 1957 Maryland 

Joseph Thomas Fav, B.A., Providence College, 1956 Rhode Island 

Humbert Michael Fiskio, A.B., Oberlin College, 1955; M.A., 

University of Connecticut, 1956 Connecticut 

Henry Paul Fox, St. Michael's College New York 

Irwood Fox, B.A., University of Virginia, 1956 Virginia 

Joseph Giardina, University of Maryland, B.S., 1957 Maryland 

Harry Gruen, University of Miami Florida 

Ernest Lee Harris, Jr., Southern Missionary College Florida 

David William Heese, B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1953. . . .Maryland 

Sanford Sonny Hochman, University of Maryland, B.S., 1957 Maryland 

Edward Allen Hurdle, Jr., B.S., Loyola College, 1956 Maryland 

45 ► 



University of Maryland 

Clemuel Mansey Johnson, B.A., The University of North Carolina, 1953 

North Carolina 

Nicholas Irving Jones, B.S., The Citadel, 1956 South Carolina 

Norman Lewis Jones, Marshall College West Virginia 

Alan Donald Jung, B.S., University of Maryland, 1952 Maryland 

Don Samuel Killpack, B.S., University of Utah, 1951 Utah 

Irwin KolikofF, B.S., Florida Southern College, 1953 New Hampshire 

Don Lee Koubek, A.B., West Virginia University, 1955 West Virginia 

Robert Marvin Kriegsman, A.B., The University of North Carolina, 1957 

North Carolina 
Scot Sueki Kubota, A.B., Colorado State College, 1953; 

A.M., 1954 Hawaii 

Nicolas Lasijczuk, Ch.D., University of Nancy New York 

Richard John Lauttman, B.S., Loyola College, 1953 Maryland 

Martin Albert Levin, University of Maryland, B.S., 1957 Maryland 

Marvin Paul Levin, University of Maryland, B.S., 1957 Maryland 

Harry Levy, University of Maryland Maryland 

William Lee Lovern, Concord College West Virginia 

Frederick Magaziner, B.S., University of Maryland, 1954 Maryland 

Martin Magaziner, University of Maryland District of Columbia 

Frank William Mastrola, Jr., B.A., Providence College, 1956. . . .Rhode Island 

Martin Lee Mays, B.S., Wofford College, 1957 South Carolina 

David Henry McLane, A.B., Marshall College, 1957 West Virginia 

John Stephen McLaughlin, West Virginia University Maryland 

John Bennett Moore, Jr., Weber College Utah 

Richard Franklin Murphy, West Virginia University West Virginia 

Theodore Jacob Noffsinger, Jr., B.A., University of Maryland, 1956. .Maryland 
Franklin Lewis Oliverio, B.S., W T est Virginia LIniversity, 1956. . .West Virginia 

Billy Wendel Olsen, B.A., University of California, 1955 California 

Bernard John Orlowski, Seton Hall University New Jersey 

Philip Kibbee Parsons, West Virginia University West Virginia 

Helmer Eugene Pearson, Upsala College New Jersey 

Alfred John Phillips, University of Florida Florida 

lames Vincent Picone, B.S., College of the Holy Cross, 1956. . .Massachusetts 

Robert Henry Prindle, B.A., St. Michael's College, 1956 New York 

Anthony Joseph Regine, B.S., Tufts College, 1955 Rhode Island 

Jude Philip Restivo, B.S., University of Maryland, 1956 Maryland 

Ronald Lee Ripley, A.B., West Virginia University, 1955 West Virginia 

Malcolm Louis Rosenbloum, Emory University Missouri 

Georges Philippe Raynald Roy, A.B., St. Michael's College, 1956 Maine 

William Joseph Rumberger, Mount Saint Mary's College Pennsylvania 

Thomas Melvin Rutherford, B.S., West Virginia Wesleyan College, 1956 

West Virginia 

Frank John Salino, The University of Buffalo New York 

Lawrence Francis Schaefer, St. Michael's College New York. 

Roger Clare Sears, University of Maryland, B.S., 1958 Maryland 

< 46 



School of Dentistry 

Howard Irwin Segal, University of Miami Florida 

Edwin Barry Shiller, Emory University Florida 

Joseph James Smith, Mount Saint Mary's College New York 

Robert Carroll Smith, A.B., West Virginia University, 1956 West Virginia 

Alvin Jerome Snyder, B.S., University of Maryland, 1956 Maryland 

David M. Solomon, B.S., Fordham University, 1956 New Jersey 

Rudolph Clement Strambi, B.S., Fordham University, 1952 New Jersey 

Wayne Eugene Stroud, University of Maryland Illinois 

George Webster Struthers, Jr., B.S., Randolph-Macon College, 1952 

West Virginia 

Edward Ralph Thompson, Temple University New Jersey 

Robert Speirs Thomson, B.A., Houghton College, 1956 New Jersey 

Earle Alexander Tompkins, Jr., B.S., University of Massachusetts, 1955 

Massachusetts 

Gilbert Allen Vitek, Graceland College Maryland 

Raymond Francis Waldron, A.B., Boston College, 1956 Massachusetts 

Martin Truett Watson, A.B., Emory University, 1954 Georgia 

Irwin Robert Weiner, University of Akron Ohio 

Wayne Clark Wills, West Virginia University West Virginia 

Charles Rosser Wilson, B.S., Wake Forest College, 1956 North Carolina 

Dale Lee Wood, Western Maryland College Maryland 

Louis Yarid. A.B.. Columbia University. 1956 Massachusetts 

junior Class 

Paul Wilfred Achin, Providence College . . > Massachusetts 

Morris Antonelli, University of Maryland, B.S., 1958 District of Columbia 

Gilbert Samuel Berman, B.S., University of Maryland, 1957 Maryland 

Cecil Samuel Boland, B.S., Newberry College, 1957 Maryland 

Lester Malcolm Breen, Emory University Georgia 

Donald Acker Michael Brown, B.A., St. John's College, 1951 Maryland 

Douglas Adams Bryans, B.S., Springfield College, 1957 Massachusetts 

George Franklin Buchness, B.S., Loyola College, 1948; M.S., Catholic 

University, 1954 Maryland 

Richard Mario Carmosino, A.B., Boston University, 1957 Massachusetts 

Thomas J. Cavanaugh, B.S., University of Maryland, 1957 Maryland 

Lawrence Leo Clark, Mount Saint Mary's College New Jersey 

James Richard Crouse, Shepherd College Maryland 

Billy Hugh Darke, B.S., Western Kentucky State College, 1954 Kentucky 

William Lawrence Doheny, Jr., University of Maryland Connecticut 

Edward Cornelius Doherty, B.A., Boston College, 1957 Massachusetts 

Maxim Duane Dunker, B.A., Walla Walla College, 1955 California 

William Duane Fitzgerald, University of Massachusetts Massachusetts 

Sheldon Donald Fliss, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

Richard Arnold Foer, B.S., University of Maryland, 1957. . .District of Columbia 
Joseph Edward Furtado, B.A., Providence College, 1954 Rhode Island 

47 ► 



University of Maryland 

William Joseph Girotti, B.A., American International College, 1957 

Massachusetts 
Raymond Emil Goepfrich, B.S., Franklin and Marshall College, 1957 

Pennsylvania 
John George Goettee, Jr., B.A., Western Maryland College, 1957. . .Maryland 

Melvin Goldenberg, B.A., Providence College, 1957 Rhode Island 

Aaron Rufus Griffith, Jr., University of South Carolina South Carolina 

Sheldon Gerald Gross, University of Vermont Massachusetts 

Stanford Edgar Hamburger, B.A., University of Maryland, 1957. .. .Maryland 

Arnold Hecht, University of Miami Florida 

Ronald Wesley Higel, University of Florida Florida 

William Paul Hoffman, Jr., Earlham College District of Columbia 

Patrick Francis Iacovelli, Jr., B.S., Boston College, 1952 Massachusetts 

Ronald Harold Israel, University of Maryland, B.S., 1958 Maryland 

Alvin Wesley Kagey, B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1957 Maryland 

Sanford Katsumi Kamezawa, University of California Hawaii 

Stanley Paul Kaminski, B.A., Seton Hall University, 1957 New Jersey 

Douglas Kaplan, B.A., Alfred University, 1957 New Jersey 

George Theodore Keary, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958. . . .Massachusetts 
Michael Edward Kolakowski, Jr., B.S., University of Maryland, 1957 

Maryland 

Robert George Kovack, B.S., Albright College, 1957 New Jersey 

Ralph Leonard Kroopnick, B.A., University of Connecticut, 1957. .Connecticut 

Robert Maurice Lattanzi, Albertus Magnus College Connecticut 

Jack Edward Liller, University of Richmond Maryland 

Arnold Irvin Loew, University of Miami Florida 

Sol Benjamin Love, Georgetown University District of Columbia 

*Keith Gerald Lown, A.B., Fresno State College, 1956 California 

Edward Salters McCallum, Newberry College South Carolina 

William Edward McLaughlin, Mount Saint Mary's College New York 

Joseph Robert Marchesani, LaSalle College New Jersey 

Richard Madison Marrone, B.S., University of Maryland, 1957 Maryland 

Alan J. Martin, Ohio University Florida 

Robert Cameron Mason, University of Maryland, B.S., 1958 Maryland 

Michael Charles Matzkin, B.A., Dartmouth College, 1957 Connecticut 

Robert Francis Meier, Mount Saint Mary's College New York 

Marc Julian Meyers, B.A., Western Maryland College, 1957 Maryland 

Ronald Britton Morley, B.A., Maryville College, 1957 New York 

Clarence John Myatt, A.B., St. Michael's College, 1957 Massachusetts 

Roy Mitsuaki Naito, B.A., University of Hawaii, 1956 Hawaii 

Antone Travers Oliveira, Jr., B.S., Tufts College, 1957 Massachusetts 

James Edward Palmer, University of Maryland Maryland 

David Bertram Pere, University of Miami Florida 

Albert Perlmutter, A.B., Boston University, 1957 Massachusetts 



Died February 25, 1960. 
48 



School of Dentistry 

Garr Thomas Phelps, Xavier University Kentucky 

Joseph Michael Pistoria, Seton Hall University New Jersey 

iirwin Stuart Raffel, B.S., University of Maryland, 1956 Maryland 

Malcolm Sidney Renbaum, B.S., Johns Hopkins University, 1956 . . . .Maryland 

John Filmore Robinson, Loyola College Maryland 

William Otis Rockefeller, University of Maryland New York 

Theodore Almada Rosa, University of Maryland, B.S., 1958 

District of Columbia 
Victor Angel Rosado, B.A., Polytechnic Institute of Puerto Rico, 1957 

Puerto Rico 

David Neuman Rudo, B.S., University of Maryland, 1957 Maryland 

Peter Paul Ryiz, University of Maryland, B.S., 1958 Connecticut 

Richard Daniel Sachs, University of Miami Florida 

Hershel Garvin Sawyer, A.B., Berea College, 1957 West Virginia 

Robert Stanley Siegel, University of Maryland, B.S., 1958 Maryland 

Frank Joseph Sinnreich, Jr., B.S., University of Maryland, 1951 Maryland 

Melvin Jordan Slan, University of Maryland Maryland 

Louis Edward Snyder, Jr., University of Maryland, B.S., 1959. .South Carolina 

James Miller Steig, Georgia Institute of Technology Florida 

Stanley Merrill Stoller, University of Maryland, B.S., 1958 Maryland 

Arthur Hein Streeter, B.S., Washington College, 1957 Maryland 

Joseph Ashley Sullivan, University of Miami Florida 

Brett Taylor Summey, B.A., University of North Carolina, 1957 

North Carolina 

John Harvey Swann, B.S., University of Maryland, 1956 Maryland 

Jerry Dale Taf t, University of Maryland Montana 

Bill Edward Taylor, University of Oklahoma Oklahoma 

Paul Irvin Teitelbaum, University of Maryland, B.S., 1958 Maryland 

Donald Mathews Tilghman, University of Maryland, B.S., 1958 Maryland 

George Bartholomew Towson, Washington College Maryland 

Norton Allen Tucker, University of Maryland, B.S., 1958 Maryland 

Nils Glick Wallen, B.A., Syracuse University, 1957 New Jersey 

Frederic James Wasserman, B.S., University of Florida, 1957 Florida 

Alfred Stewart Windeler, Jr., Johns Hopkins University New Jersey 

William Herbert Witherspoon, West Virginia University Pennsylvania 

Larry Emanuel Wynne, Emory University Florida 

Stanlev Leonard Zakarin, University of Florida Florida 

John Francis Zulaski, B.A., American International College, 1957. . .Connecticut 

Sophomore Class 

Frederick Bradshaw Abbott, Southeast Missouri State College Maryland 

Tulio Fulvio Albertini, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

James Emil Andrews, B.S., Wake Forest College, 1958 North Carolina 

Robert Apfel, B.A., University of Miami, 1958 Florida 

Marvin Bennet Apter, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

49 ► 



University of Maryland 

Joseph erman Axelrod, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

Michael Alan Balenson, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

Donald Harry Barnes, College of the Pacific California 

Howard Benjamin Berman, Emory University Florida 

Samuel Blum, University of Maryland, B.S., 1959 District of Columbia 

William John Bowen, B.S., University of Maryland, 1957; M.S., 1959 

Maryland 

Roger Lee Brown, University of Maryland Pennsylvania 

Peter John Buchetto, Jr., University of Connecticut Connecticut 

Barry Stanley Buchman, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

Paul William Bushman, B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1958. . .Maryland 

Robert Moore Charlton, B.S., University of Maryland, 1960 Maryland 

Jerome Milton Chertkoff, B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1958. .Maryland 

George Gary Clendenin, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

David Constantinos, B.A., American International College, 1957. .Massachusetts 

William Howard Dickson, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

Albert William Doetzer, B.S., Loyola College, 1958 Maryland 

Richard Farish Downes, Jr., B.S., University of Maryland, 1953 Maryland 

John Theodore Drescher, B.A., University of Connecticut, 1958. . . .Connecticut 

Alvin Engel, University of Maryland Maryland 

Henry Anthony Fischer, B.S., University of Florida, 1958 Florida 

James Scott Foulke, B.S., University of Maryland, 1956 Maryland 

Neil Arthur Friedman, University of Southern California California 

Richard Saul Friedman, A.B., Rutgers University, 1957 New Jersey 

Thomas Brent Gable, Franklin and Marshall College Pennsylvania 

Charles Augustus Gallagher, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959. .. .Maryland 
Lawrence Allan Gallerani, B.A., American International College, 1958 

Massachusetts 

Ronald Irvin Glaeser, B.A., Western Maryland College, 1958 Maryland 

Milton Josef Glatzer, A.B., Rutgers College, 1958 New Jersey 

Marshall Robert Goldman, B.S., University of Maryland, 1960. .. .Maryland 
George Joseph Goodreau, Jr., A.B., St. Anselm's College, 1953. .New Hampshire 

Robert Gordon, A.B., Boston University, 1958 Massachusetts 

Larry Earl Grace, B.S., Concord College, 1956 West Virginia 

Robert Duane Hackney, The State College of Washington Washington 

Lawrence Frank Halpert, B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1958. .Maryland 

Laurence Eugene Johns, Shepherd College Maryland 

James Paul Johnson, B.S., Mount Saint Mary's College, 1958 Pennsylvania 

Laddie Lynn Jones, B.S., Presbyterian College, 1958 South Carolina 

David Brainard Kirby, Jr., B.A., University of Pennsylvania, 1958. .Pennsylvania 

Martin Kline, Emory University Florida 

Pxichard Thomas Koritzer, The Johns Hopkins University Maryland 

Robert Alan Kramer, Lafayette College New Jersey 

Daniel Levy, Emory University Georgia 

Donald Eugene Lilley, Southern Missionary College Maryland 

Berton Abner Lowell, University of Miami Florida 

-< 50 



School of Dentistry 

Sidney Samuel Markowitz, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

Joseph David Mechanick, University of Maryland Maryland 

Stephen Mark Millison, University of Maryland Maryland 

Stephen Hollingshead Mills, University of Florida Florida 

Alan Tatsuo Miyamoto, B.A., Simpson College, 1958 Hawaii 

Kermit Lee Norton, Fresno State College California 

Harvey Sheldon Fallen, University of Florida Florida 

Robert Parker, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

*John Albert Patterson, B.S., Davidson College, 1958 North Carolina 

Allan Buckner Pertnoy, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

Gerald Alan Pinsky, University of Miami Florida 

Albert Louis Pizzi, B.S., Springfield College, 1958 Massachusetts 

Leo Rabago, Jr., Fresno State College California 

Sylvan Rankin, B.S., University of Maryland, 1960 Maryland 

Paul Francis Regan, B.A., Boston College, 1958 Massachusetts 

Donald Arthur Romeo, A.B., St. Anselm's College, 1956 Massachusetts 

Lee Howard Roper, B.S., University of Maryland, 1960 New Hampshire 

Jack Arnold Roth, West Virginia University Maryland 

Howard Leslie Rothschild, University of Maryland Maryland 

David Rubin, University of Miami Florida 

Howard Frederick Rudo, B.A., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

Joseph Anthony Salvo, Jr., B.S., Tufts College, 1958 Massachusetts 

Earle Milton Schulz, Jr., B.S., University of Maryland, 1960 Maryland 

Howard Erwin Schunick, University of Maryland Maryland 

Frank Lewis Schwartz, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

Allen Hirch Simmons, A.B., Fresno State College, 1955 California 

Reed Campbell Snow, University of Utah Utah 

Theodore Sheldon Sobkov, B.A., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

Irvin Murray Sopher, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

Dennis Martin Sullivan, University of Georgia South Carolina 

John Thomson, III, Houghton College New Jersey 

Norman Michael Trabulsy, B.S., University of Miami, 1957 Florida 

Alan Jay Trager, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

Lamar Gordon Warren, Jr., University of Florida Florida 

Robert William Warson, B.S., Loyola College, 1958 Maryland 

Roger Allan Webster, University of Oregon California 

Jerome Jacob Weinstein, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

John Charles Wilhelm, A.B., Western Maryland College, 1953 Maryland 

Rex Patrick Wood, B.S., The State College of Washington, 1958. . .Washington 
David Ansel Young, Whittier College California 

Freshman Class 

Richard Paul Beimler, A.B., Gettysburg College, 1955 New York 

Frank Melcon Benneyan, A.B., Fresno State College, 1959 California 



* Attended part session 

51 



University of Maryland 

John David Bimestefer, A.B., Duke University, 1959 Maryland 

David Wayne Bishop, Newberry College South Carolina 

Leonard Donald Blumson, B.S., University of Miami, 1957 Maryland 

Richard Allen Bochkor, A.B., St. Michael's College, 1954. .. .Massachusetts 

Robert Jack Burt, B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1959 Maryland 

Carl Michael Caplan, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

James McCormick Carew, B.A., St. Anselm's College, 1959. .New Hampshire 

Ronald Albert Carter, A.B., Fresno State College, 1958 California 

Earl LeRoy Chambers, Jr., B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 ... .Maryland 

Dale Richard Collins, University of Pittsburgh Pennsylvania 

Frank Costabile, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 New Jersey 

* Leonard Hilyard Cutler, University of Delaware Delaware 

Thomas Michael Darrigan, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959.... New York 

Renato Patrick DeSantis, A.B., Loyola College, 1958 Maryland 

Glenn Boyd Dickerson, University of South Carolina South Carolina 

Gene Watkins Eng, B.A., Emory University, 1959 Florida 

William Bernard Finagin, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 

District of Columbia 

Michael Alan Fine, A.B., Catawba College, 1959 New York 

Robert Pacy Fleishman, Loyola College Maryland 

Stanley Berle Foxman, B.A., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

Leon Friedman, B.A., Lehigh University, 1959 New Jersey 

Franklin F. Frush, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

Richard Anthony Gallagher, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959. .. .Maryland 

Francis Xavier Geczik, B.S., Iona College, 1959 New York 

Peter Lewis Goldstone, A.B., Harvard College, 1959 New York 

Leroy Goren, University of Maryland Maryland 

Herbert Gottlieb, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

Mark Lee Govrin, University of Maryland New Jersey 

William Herbert Griswold, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958. . . .New Jersey 

John Estyle Hanson, B.S., Shepherd College, 1959 Maryland 

Wilberto Francisco Hernandez- Vales, B.S., University of Puerto Rico, 1959 

Puerto Rico 

Stanley Elliott Hyatt, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

Carl Winston Irwin, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

Ralph William Jacobson, Emory University Florida 

William Carl Jennette, Jr., B.S., Wake Forest College, 1959 Maryland 

Dean Clvde Johnson, University of Utah Utah 

Robert Allen Katz, B.S., Boston College, 1959 Massachusetts 

Clayton Edward King, B.A., Providence College, 1959 Massachusetts 

Donald Raymond King, University of Florida Florida 

Earl Ephraim Klioze, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

Herbert Mark Koenigsberg, University of Maryland Maryland 

Stanley Louis Kolker, University of Maryland Maryland 

* Attended part session. 

< 52 



School of Dentistry 

George Andrew Kraft, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 Pennsylvania 

George Krupinsky, Jr., B.A., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

Paul Max Ladd, University of Miami Florida 

Richard Joseph Landino, B.A., Providence College, 1959 Connecticut 

Stuart Theodore Landsman, B.S., Queens College, 1959 New York 

Delia Ruth Looper, B.A., Longwood College, 1959 Virginia 

Lorin George Maser, University of Maryland District of Columbia 

Martin Bruce Millkon, B.A., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

Harry Charles Mullins, Concord College West Virginia 

Martin Neil Narun, B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1958 Maryland 

* Richard Stephen Nemes, American University Pennsylvania 

Jerome William Newman, B.A., The Citadel, 1959 Florida 

David Bennett Nuckols, B.A., University of Tennessee, 1949 Kentucky 

George William Oatis, Jr., University of Maryland Connecticut 

Samuel Oshry, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

John Charles Pentzer, B.S., University of Maryland, 1955 Maryland 

Stanford Elliott Picker, B.A., University of California, 1958; M.A., 1959 

California 
Robert Theobald Probst, II, Iowa State College, B.S., 1950; M.S., 1952 

Connecticut 
George Michael Quinlan, Jr., B.A., American International College, 1957 

Massachusetts 

John Robert Rasczewski, Bucknell University Maryland 

Richard Mann Reddish, University of Maryland Maryland 

Martin Stewart Reeber, University of Florida Florida 

Francis Richard Richo, B.A., Providence College, 1959 Connecticut 

Edward Richard Rose, B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1959 Maryland 

Ivan Alan Rosengarden, B.A., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

Paul Rubinstein, University of Maryland Maryland 

Nicolaus Sakiewicz, B.S., Columbia University, 1959 New Jersey 

Robert Alan Samuel, University of Florida Florida 

Fred Maurice Scholnick, University of Maryland Maryland 

Paul Wesley Shaffer, West Virginia University Maryland 

Donald Siegendorf , University of Miami Florida 

Howard Ronald Siegler, University of Miami New York 

Junius Thomas Soliday, Davis and Elkins College West Virginia 

Edward David Spire, University of Maryland Maryland 

John Walter Staubach, B.S., Franklin and Marshall College, 1959. . .Maryland 

* Kenneth Bernard Stern, University of Maryland Maryland 

George Cyril Strong, Los Angeles City College California 

Eberhard Wolfgang Tinter, Iona College Germany 

Thomas John Toman, University of Maryland Maryland 

Peter Anthony Tomasello, B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1959. .New Jersey 
Henry John Van Hassel, B.A., Maryville College, 1954 New Jersey 



'Attended part session. 

53 



University of Maryland 

Lorenzo Stephan Vazzana, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 . . Maryland 

Kenneth Harold Webster, State College of Washington Washington 

Francis William Welch, B.S., Springfield College, 1958 Massachusetts 

Paul Xavier Welch, American International College Massachusetts 

George Carl White, West Virginia University West Virginia 

Joseph Michael Wiesenbaugh, Jr., Mount Saint Mary's College .... Pennsylvania 
Harvey Ray Wildman, B.S., Mount Saint Mary's College, 1959. .Connecticut 

Herbert Alan Wolford, D.V.M., Michigan State College, 1952 Pennsylvania 

Sheldon Joel Wollman, Johns Hopkins University Maryland 

Gary Lee Womer, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

Maurice Richard Woodard, B.S., American University, 1952 Maryland 

Donald Russell Yent, University of Maryland Maryland 



*« 54 



School of Dentistry 

DEANS OF DENTAL SCHOOLS IN BALTIMORE 
BALTIMORE COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 

(Founded 1840) 

Chapin A. Harris 1840-1841 

Thomas E. Bond 1841-1842 

Washington R. Handy 1842-1853 

Philip H. Austen 1853-1865 

Ferdinand J. S. Gorgas 1865—1882 

Richard B. Winder 1882-1894 

M. Whilldin Foster 1894-1914 

William G. Foster 1914-1923 

MARYLAND DENTAL COLLEGE 

1873-1878 (Merged with B. C. D. S.) 

Richard B. Winder 1873-1878 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

(Founded 1882) 

Ferdinand J. S. Gorgas 1882-191 1 

Timothy O. Heatwole 1911-1923 

BALTIMORE MEDICAL COLLEGE 

1895-1913 (Merged with U. of Md.) 

J. William Smith 1895-1901 

William A. Montell 1901—1903 

T. Edgar Orrison 1903—1904 

J. William Smith 1904-1913 

BALTIMORE COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 

DENTAL SCHOOL 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

(B. C. D. S. Joined the U. of Md. 1923) 

Timothy O. Heatwole 1923—1924 

J. Ben Robinson 1924-1953 

Myron S. Aisenberg (Acting) 1953 

Myron S. Aisenberg 1954— present 

55 ► 



University of Maryland 



INDEX 



Academic Calendar 2 

Admission Requirements 11 

Admission with Advanced 

Standing 14 

Alumni Association 39-40 

Anatomy 24-25 

Application Procedures 13 

Arts and Sciences- 
Dental Program 11-13 

Attendance Requirements 14 

Baltimore Union 20-2 1 

Biochemistry 25 

Board of Regents 1 

Cafeteria 20 

Curriculum, Plan of 22-23 

Deans of the Baltimore 

Dental Schools 55 

Definition of Residence and 

Non-Residence 18 

Dental History and Literature. .25-26 
Dental Prosthesis 

Removable Complete and 

Partial Prosthesis 26-27 

Fixed Partial Prosthesis 27-28 

Deportment 15 

Description of Courses 24-38 

Diagnosis 28 

Dormitory Accommodations .... 20-2 1 

Equipment Requirements 15 

Faculty Listing 3-8 

Fees, Graduate 17 

Fees, Student 16 

Freshman Class 5 1-54 

Gorgas Odontological Society. . . 38 
Graduating Class (1958-59 Ses- 
sion) 42-44 

Graduation Requirements 15-16 



Histology 28-29 

History of the School 9-10 

Index 56 

Junior Class 47-49 

Library 10 

Matriculation and Enrollment. . 13 
Medicine 

General Medicine 29 

Oral Medicine 30 

Microbiology 30-3 1 

Officers of Administration 3 

Officers of Instruction 3-8 

Omicron Kappa Upsilon 38-39 

Operative Dentistry 31-32 

Orthodontics 32 

Pathology 32-33 

Pedodontics 33-34 

Pharmacology 34 

Physiology 35 

Postgraduate Courses 17 

Practice Administration 35-36 

Promotion and Grading 14-15 

Refunds 17 

Registration 17-18 

Requirements for Admission ... 11 
Requirements for Graduation ..15-16 
Requirements for Matriculation 

and Enrollment 13 

Roentgenology 36 

Scholarship and Loan Funds. . . 19-20 

Senior Class 45-47 

Senior Prize Awards 41 

Sophomore Class 49-5 1 

Summer Courses 38 

Student Health Service 18-19 

Surgery 36-37 

Visual Aids 37-38 



56 




Catalog of 



School of Dentistry 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

T*k ¥ T ¥ ¥ ¥—1 Tt X "V T 



The provisions of this publication are not to he regarded 
as an irrevocable contract between the student and the 
University of Maryland. The University reserves the 
right to change any provision or requirement at any time 
within the student's term of residence. The University 
further reserves the right at any time, to ask a student 
to withdraw when it considers such action to be in the 
best interests of the University. 



ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY FIRST CATALOGUE 

with 

Announcements For 

The 1961-1962 Session 




BALTIMORE COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 
DENTAL SCHOOL 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 



THE PROVISIONS of this publication are not to be regarded as an irrevocable con- 
tract between the student and the University of Maryland. The University reserves 
the right to change any provision or requirement at any time within the student's 
term of residence. The University further reserves the right at any time, to ask a 
student to withdraw when it considers such action to be in the best interests of the 
University. 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

and 
MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE 

Term 
Expires 
Charles P. McCormick 

Chairman 1966 

McCormick and Company, 414 Light Street, Baltimore 2 

Edward F. Holter 

Vice-Chairman 1968 

Farmers Home Administration, U. S. D. A.. Appraisers Stores' Building, 
10? South Gay Street, Baltimore, Maryland 

B. Herbert Brown 

Secretary 1967 

The Baltimore Instinite, 10 West Chase Street, Baltimore 1 

Harry H. Nuttle 

Treasurer 1966 

Denton 

Louis L. Kaplan 

Assistant Secretary 1964 

5800 Park Heights Avenue, Baltimore 15 

C. EWTNG TUTTLE 

Assistant Treasurer 1962 

907 Latrobe Building, Charles and Read Streets, Baltimore 2 

Richard W. Case 1967 

Commercial Credit Building, Baltimore 

Thomas W. Pangborn 1965 

The Pangborn Corporation, Pangborn Blvd., Hagerstown 

Thomas B. Symons 1963 

Suburban Trust Company, 6950 Carroll Avenue, Takoma Park 

William C. Walsh 1968 

Liberty Trust Building, Cumberland 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst 1967 

4101 Green way, Baltimore 18 



Members of the Board are appointed by the Governor of the State for terms of 
seven years each, beginning the first Monday in June. Members may serve only two 
consecutive terms. 

The President of the University of Maryland is, by law, Executive Officer of the 
Board. 

The State law provides that the Board of Regents of the University of Maryland 
shall constitute the Maryland State Board of Agriculture. 



University of Maryland 

ACADEMIC CALENDAR 
1961-1962 Session 

First Semester 

1961 

September 18 .... Monday .... Orientation Program for Freshman Class 
September 19 ... .Tuesday . Registration for Freshman Class 
September 20 .... Wednesday . . Registration for Sophomore Class 
September 21 ... .Thursday . . Registration for Junior and Senior Classes 

September 22 .... Friday Instruction begins with first scheduled period 

November 21 Tuesday . .Thanksgiving recess begins at close of last 

scheduled period 
November 27 .... Monday .... Instruction resumes with first scheduled 

period 
December 20 Wednesday . . Christmas recess begins at close of last sched- 
uled period 

1962 

January 3 Wednesday . . Instruction resumes with first scheduled 

period 
January 29 and 30. Monday 

Tuesday .... Second Semester Registration 
February 2 Friday First Semester ends at the close of last 

scheduled period 

Second Semester 

February 5 Monday .... Instruction begins with first scheduled period 

February 22 Thursday . . . Washington's Birthday— Holiday 

April 19 Thursday . . . Easter recess begins at close of last scheduled 

period 

April 24 Tuesday .... Instruction resumes with first scheduled pe- 
riod 

May 30 Wednesday . . Memorial Day— Holiday 

June 7 Thursday . . . Second Semester ends at close of last sched- 
uled period 

June 9 Saturday .... Commencement 

A student who registers after instruction begins must pay a late registration fee of 
$5.00. No late registration will be approved after Friday of the first week of instruction. 

<* 2 



School of Dentistry 
OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 
wilson homer elkins, President of the University 

B.A., M.A., B.LITT., D.PHIL. 

MYRON S. AISENBERG, Dean 
D.D.S. 

Katharine toomey, Administrative Assistant 

LL.D. 

G. watson algire, Director of Admissions and Registrations 

B.A., M.S. 

norma j. azlein, Registrar 

B.A. 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 
1960-1961 SESSION 
Emeritus 

J. BEN ROBINSON, Demi EviflitllS 
D.D.S., D.SC. 

Professors 

myron s. aisenberg, Professor of Pathology 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1922. 

Joseph calton biddix, jr., Professor of Oral Diagnosis 
d.d.s. , University of Maryland, 1934. 

edward c. dobbs, Professor of Pharmacology and Therapeutics 
d.d.s. , University of .Maryland, 1929; b.s., 1952. 

brice marden dorsey, Professor of Oral Surgery 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1927. 

Gardner Patrick henry Foley, Professor of Dental Literature 
b.a., Clark University, 1923; m.a., 1926. 

grayson wilbur gaver, Professor of Dental Prosthesis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1922. 

William edward hahn, Professor of Anatomy 

d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1931; a.b., University of Rochester, 1938; m.s. 1939. 

jose e. Medina, Professor of Operative Dentistry 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1948. 

ernest b. nuttall, Professor of Fixed Partial Prosthesis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1931. 



University of Maryland 

kyrle w. preis, Professor of Orthodontics 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1929. 

d. vincent provenza, Professor of Histology and Embryology 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1939; M.S., 1941; ph.d., 1952. 

wilbur owen ramsey, Professor of Dental Prosthesis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1943. 

donald e. shay, Professor of Microbiology 

b.s., Lebanon Valley College, 1937; M.S., University of Maryland, 1938; ph.d., 1943. 

e. g. vanden bosche, Professor of Biochemistry 

a.b., Lebanon Valley College, 1922; m.s., University of Maryland, 1924; ph.d., 1927. 

john irving white, Professor of Physiology 

b.a., University of Illinois, 1939; ph.d., Rutgers University, 1950. 



Associate Professors 

irving i. abramson, Associate Professor of Oral Medicine 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1932. 

Joseph Patrick cappuccio, Associate Professor of Oral Surgery 

b.s., University of Rhode Island, 1943; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1946. 

Stanley h. dosh, Associate Professor of Fixed Partial Prosthesis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1935. 

ALvrN f. Gardner, Associate Professor of Pathology 

a.a., University of Florida, 1940; d.d.s., Emory University, 1943; m.s., University 
of Illinois, 1957; ph.d., Georgetown University, 1959. 

harold golton, Associate Professor of Oral Diagnosis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1925. 

yam-hin louie, Associate Professor of Operative Dentistry 

b.s., Lingnan University, Canton, China, 1938; d.d.s., Northwestern University, 
1945; m.s.d, 1946. 

george mc lean, Associate Professor of Physical Diagnosis and Principles of 
Medicine 

m.d., University of Maryland, 1916. 

peter mc lean lu, Associate Professor of Fixed Partial Prosthesis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1934. 

Walter l. oggesen, Associate Professor of Fixed Partial Prosthesis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1926. 

burton robert pollack, Associate Professor of Physiology 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1946. 

douglas john sanders, Associate Professor of Pedodontics 
b.s., Northwestern University, 1946; d.d.s., 1948. 



School of Dentistry 

e. Roderick Shipley, Associate Professor of Physiology 

a.b., The Johns Hopkins University, 1938; m.d., University of Maryland, 1942. 

guy paul Thompson, Associate Professor of Anatomy 
a.b., West Virginia University, 1923; a.m., 1929. 

l. edward warner, Associate Professor of Dental Prosthesis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland. 1931. 



Assistant Professors 

alvin david aisenberg, Assistant Professor of Pathology 
d.d.s. , University of Maryland, 1945. 

samuel hollinger bryant, Assistant Professor of Oral Diagnosis 

a.b., Western Maryland College, 1928; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1932. 

hugh m. clement, jr., Assistant Professor of Operative Dentistry 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1944. 

jerome s. cullen, Assistant Professor of Orthodontics 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1941. 

fred ehrlich, Assistant Professor of Pedodontics 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1947. 

calvtn Joseph gaver, Assistant Professor of Operative Dentistry 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1950; d.d.s., 1954. 

marvtn m. graham, Assistant Professor of Fixed Partial Prosthesis 

a.b., Cornell University, 1938; a.m., 1939; d.d.s., University of Pennsylvania, 1943. 

conrad l. inman, Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology 
d.d.s., Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, 1915. 

william kress, Assistant Professor of Orthodontics 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1936. 

james p. norris, Assistant Professor in Oral Medicine 
b.s., University of Man land, 1950; d.d.s., 1956. 

george w. piavis, Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

a.b., Western Maryland College, 1948; m.ed., 1952; ph.d., Duke University, 1958. 

Norton morris ross, Assistant Professor of Pharmacology 

b.s., University of Connecticut, 1949; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1954. 

daniel edward shehan, Assistant Professor of Orthodontics 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1922. 

Arthur g. si win ski, Assistant Professor of Oral Surgery 

a.b., The Johns Hopkins University, 1927; m.d., University of Maryland, 1931. 

d. Robert swinehart, Assistant Professor of Orthodontics 

a.b., Dartmouth College, 1933; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1937. 



University of Maryland 

edmond g. vanden bosche, Assistant Professor of Tooth Morphology 

b.s., The Pennsylvania State University, 1943; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1947. 

david h. willer, Assistant Professor of Full Denture Prosthesis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1933. 

Special Lecturers 

c. Richard fravel, Lecturer in Principles of Medicine 
m.d., University of Maryland, 1949. 

martin helrich, Professor of Anesthesiology (School of Medicine') 
b.s., Dickinson College, 1946; m.d., University of Pennsylvania, 1946. 

richard lindenberg, Lecturer in Neuroanatomy 
m.d., University of Berlin, 1944. 

ethelbert lovett, Lecturer in Ethics 

d.d.s., Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, 1922. 

William j. o'donnell, Lecturer in jurisprudence 

a.b., Loyola College, 1937; ll.b., University of Maryland, 1941. 

harry m. robinson, jr., Professor of Dermatology (School of Medicine*) 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1931; m.d., 1935. 

george herschel yeager, Professor of Clinical Surgery (School of Medicine) 
b.s., West Virginia University, 1927; m.d., University of Maryland, 1929. 

Instructors 

sterrett p. beaven, Instructor in Operative Dentistry 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1941. 

earl F. becker, Instructor in Microbiology 

b.s., Muhlenberg College, 1951; M.S., George Washington University, 1957. 

henry j. bianco, Instructor in Operative Dentistry 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1956. 

jerome d. buxbaum, Instructor in Physiology 
b.sc, University of Maryland, 1951; d.d.s., 1955. 

thomas f. clement, Instructor in Oral Medicine 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1951. 

charles a. darby, Instructor in Roentgenology 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1960. 

paul a. deems, Instructor in Orthodontics 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1928. 

jose h. diaz, Instructor in Operative Dentistry 

b.s., University of Puerto Rico, 1941; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1950. 

frank a. dolle, Instructor in Pharmacology and Therapeutics 

b.s., University of Maryland, 1948; m.s., 1950; ph.d., 1954; d.d.s., 1959. 



School of Dentistry 

conrad c. ferlita, Instructor in Pedodontics 

b.s., University of Miami, 1956; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1959. 

John m. Foley, Instructor in Histology and Embryology 

b.s., Loyola College, 1955; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1959. 

Joseph j. giardina, Instructor in Pedodontics 

b.s., University of Maryland, 1957; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1960. 

ralph jack Gordon, Instructor in Dental Prosthesis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1933. 

Walter granruth, jr., Instructor in Pathology 

b.s., Loyola College, 1950; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1954. 

Robert l. heldrich, Instructor in Oral Diagnosis 

a.b., Gettysburg College, 1951; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1955. 

richard m. hemphill, Instructor in Oral Surgery 

a.b., West Virginia University, 1954; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1958. 

melvtn john jAGiELSKi, Instructor in Tooth Morphology 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1953. 

peter l. johnson, Instructor in Oral Surgery 

b.a., Hofstra College, 1953; d.d.s., Georgetown University, 1957. 

francis j. kihn, Instructor in Pedodontics 

b.s., Loyola College, 1952; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1956. 

anthony j. klein, Instructor in Roentgenology 

b.s., University of Cincinnati, 1954; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1958. 

lester lebo, Instructor in Oral Diagnosis 
b.s., University of Chicago, 1938; m.d., 1941. 

charles brown Leonard, jr., Instructor in Biochemistry 

b.a., Rutgers College of South Jersey, 1955; M.S., University of Maryland, 1957. 

richard r. c. Leonard, Instructor in Public Health Dentistry 

d.d.s., Indiana University, 1922; m.s.p.h., University of Michigan, 1944. 

charles e. love man, Instructor in Anatomy 

a.b., The Johns Hopkins University, 1935; d.d.s., Columbia University, 1939. 

john s. mclaughldx, Instructor in Oral Medicine 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1960. 

martin h. morris, Instructor in Biochemistry 
b.s., Rutgers University, 1952; m.s., 1954. 

Theodore j. noffsinger, jr., Instructor in Operative Dentistry 

a.b., University of Maryland, 1956; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1960. 

Christopher j. o'connell, jr., Instructor in Oral Surgery 

b.s., Holy Cross College, 1952; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1956. 



University of Maryland 

frank n. ogden, Instructor in First Aid and in Charge of Medical Care of 
Students 

m.d., University of Maryland, 1917. 

victor s. primrose, Instructor in Full Denture Prosthesis 
d.d.s., McGill University, 1918. 

myron hillard sachs, Instructor in Anatomy 
d.d.s., Columbia University, 1939. 

Joseph h. seipp, Instructor in Histology and Embryology 

a.b., Loyola College, 1951; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1955; M.S., University 
of Pittsburgh, 1957. 

philip smith, Instructor in Oral Diagnosis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1959. 

leah m. p. staling, Instructor in Physiology 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1944; m.s., 1948. 

glenn d. Steele, Instructor in Fixed Partial Prosthesis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1942. 

claude p. taylor, Director of Visual Education 

Francis a. veltre, Instructor in Operative Dentistry 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1952; m.s., 1954; d.d.s., 1959. 

earle Harris watson, Instructor in Dental Materials and Dental Prosthesis 
a.b., University of North Carolina, 1938; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1942. 

nelson A. wright, Instructor in Full Denture Prosthesis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1955. 

george d. yent, jr., Instructor in Full Denture Prosthesis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1956. 

Library Staff 

eda marian robinson, Librarian and Associate Professor of Library Science 
a.b., Cornell University, 1924; b.s.l.s., Columbia University School of Library 
Service, 1944. 

hilda e. moore, Associate Librarian and Assistant Professor of Library Science 
a.b., Randolph-Macon Woman's College, 1936; a.b.l.s., Emory University Library 
School, 1937. 

sarah l. atkins, Cataloging Assistant 

marie m. chaffman, Assistant Circulation Librarian 

Jacqueline b. clem, Secretary to the Librarian 

Edith m. coyle, Head, Serials Department 

a.b., University of North Carolina, 1937; a.b.l.s., University of North Carolina 
School of Library Science, 1939; m.a., The Johns Hopkins University, 1945. 



School of Dentistry 

ruth E. hanna, Assistayit Acquisitions Librarian 

a.b., Hanover College, 1939; m.s.l.s., Catholic University of America, 1961. 

simone c. hurst, Head, Circulation Department 

Florence r. kirk, Reference Librarian 

betty b. linkous, Cataloging Assistant 

hans-guenther r. listfeldt, Assistant Serials Librarian 

b.s., Loyola College, 1956; m.s.l.s., Catholic University of America, 1961. 

Beatrice marriott, Reference Librarian 
a.b., University of Maryland, 1944. 

eleanor m. mitten, Head, Catalog Department 

b.s., Cornell University, 1942; b.s.l.s., Syracuse University, 1949. 

elwood sterling, Library Clerk 

marjorie f. vilk, Cataloger 

b.s., Kutztown State Teachers College, 1952. 

CATHERINE M. WHEATLEY, Serials Assistant 



THE SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 

History 

THE BALTIMORE COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY OCCUPIES AN IMPORTANT AND 
interesting place in the history of dentistry. At the end of the regular ses- 
sion— 1960-61— it completed its one hundred and twenty-first year of service to 
dental education. The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery represents the first 
effort in history to offer institutional dental education to those anticipating the 
practice of dentistry. 

The first lectures on dentistry in America were delivered by Dr. Horace 
H. Hayden in the University of Maryland, School of Medicine, between the 
years 1823-25. These lectures were interrupted in 1825 by internal dissensions 
in the School of Medicine and were as a consequence discontinued. It was Dr. 
Hayden's idea that dental education merited greater attention than had been 
given it by medicine or could be given it by the preceptorial plan of dental 
teaching then in vogue. 

Dr. Horace H. Hayden began the practice of dentistry in Baltimore in 1800. 
From that time he made a zealous attempt to lay the foundation for a scientific, 
serviceable dental profession. In 1831 Dr. Chapin A. Harris came to Baltimore 
to study under Hayden. Dr. Harris was a man of unusual ability and possessed 
special qualifications to aid in establishing and promoting formal dental educa- 
tion. Since Dr. Hayden's lectures had been interrupted at the University of 
Maryland and there was an apparent unsurmountable difficulty confronting the 
creation of dental departments in medical schools, an independent college was 
decided upon. A charter was applied for and granted by the Maryland Legis- 
lature February 1, 1840. The first Faculty meeting was held February 3, 1840, 
at which time Dr. Horace H. Hayden was elected President and Dr. Chapin A. 
Harris, Dean. The introductory lecture was delivered by Dr. Hayden on No- 
vember 3, 1840, to the five students matriculating in the first class. Thus was 
created as the foundation of the present dental profession the Baltimore College 
of Dental Surgery, the first dental school in the world. 

Hayden and Harris, the admitted founders of conventional dental education, 
contributed, in addition to the factor of dental education, other opportunities for 
professional growth and development. In 1839 the American journal of Dental 
Science was founded, with Chapin A. Harris as its editor. Dr. Harris continued 
fully responsible for dentistry's initial venture into periodic dental literature to 
the time of his death. The files of the old American Journal of Dental Science 
testify to the fine contributions made by Dr. Harris. In 1840 the American 
Society of Dental Surgeons was founded, with Dr. Horace H. Hayden as its 
President and Dr. Chapin A. Harris as its Corresponding Secretary. This was 
the beginning of dental organization in America, and was the forerunner of the 
American Dental Association, which now numbers approximately ninety-three 
thousand in its present membership. The foregoing suggests the unusual in- 
fluence Baltimore dentists and the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery have 
exercised on professional ideals and policies. 



10 



School of Dentistry 

In 1873, the Maryland Dental College, an offspring of the Baltimore Col- 
lege of Dental Surgery, was organized. It continued instruction until 1878, at 
which time it was consolidated with the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery. 
A department of dentistry was organized at the University of Maryland in the 
year 1882, graduating a class each year from 1883 to 1923. This school was 
chartered as a corporation and continued as a privately owned and directed insti- 
tution until 1920, when it became a State institution. The Dental Department 
of the Baltimore Medical College was established in 1895, continuing until 1913, 
when it merged with the Dental Department of the University of Maryland. 

The final combining of the dental educational interests of Baltimore was 
effected June 15, 1923, by the amalgamation of the student bodies of the Balti- 
more College of Dental Surgery and the University of Maryland, School of Den- 
tistry; the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery becoming a distinct department 
of the University under State supervision and control. Thus we find in the 
Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, University of Maryland, a 
merging of the various efforts at dental education in Maryland. From these 
component elements have radiated developments of the art and science of den- 
tistry until the strength of its alumni is second to none, in either number or 
degree of service to the profession. 

Library 

This School is fortunate in having one of the better equipped and organized 
libraries among the dental schools of the country. The dental collection is part 
of the Health Sciences Library, which includes also pharmacy, medicine and 
nursing, with about 90,000 bound volumes and over 1600 current subscriptions 
to scientific periodicals. A new air-conditioned, four-story library building at 
111 South Greene, across the street from the Dental School, provides ample 
space for books and readers. A well-qualified staff of professionally trained and 
certified librarians promotes the services of the library and assists the student 
body in the use of library resources. One of the most important factors of the 
dental student's education is to teach him the value and the use of dental litera- 
ture in his formal education and in promoting his usefulness and value to the 
profession during practice. The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery is ideally 
equipped to achieve this aim of dental instruction. 

Course of Instruction 

The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, University of 
Maryland offers a course in dentistry devoted to instruction in the medical 
sciences, the dental sciences, and clinical practice. Instruction consists of di- 
dactic lectures, laboratory instruction, demonstrations, conferences, quizzes and 
hospital ward rounds. Topics are assigned for collateral reading to train the stu- 
dent in the value and use of dental literature. The curriculum for the complete 
course appears on pages 23 and 24 of this catalogue. 



11 



University of Maryland 

Requirements for Admission 

Applicants for admission must present evidence of having completed success- 
fully two academic years of work in an accredited college of arts and sciences 
based upon the completion of a four-year high school course or the equivalent 
in entrance examinations. The college course must include at least a year's 
credit in English, in hiology, in -physics, in inorganic chemistry, and in organic 
chemistry. All required science courses shall include both classroom and labor- 
atory instruction. Although a minimum of 60 semester hours of credit, exclusive 
of physical education and military science, is required, additional courses in the 
humanities and the natural and social sciences are desirable. By ruling of the 
Dean's Council, all admission requirements must be completed by June 30 previ- 
ous to the desired date of admission. 

In considering candidates for admission, the Board of Admissions will give 
preference to those applicants who have high scholastic records in secondary 
school and in college; who make satisfactory scores in the dental aptitude test; 
who present favorable recommendations from their respective predental com- 
mittee or from one instructor in each of the departments of biology, chemistry, 
and physics; and who, in all other respects, give every promise of becoming suc- 
cessful students and dentists of high standing. Applicants will not be admitted 
with unabsolved conditions or unabsolved failures. 



Combined Arts and Sciences-Dental Program 

The University offers a combined arts and sciences-dental curriculum lead- 
ing to the degrees of Bachelor of Science and Doctor of Dental Surgery. The 
preprofessional part of this curriculum shall be taken in residence in the College 
of Arts and Sciences at College Park, and the professional part in the School of 
Dentistry in Baltimore. 

Students who elect the combined program and who have completed the arts 
and sciences phase of it may, upon the recommendation of the Dean of the 
School of Dentistry, be granted the degree of Bachelor of Science by the College 
of Arts and Sciences at the first summer commencement following the comple- 
tion of the student's first year in the School of Dentistry. A student may enter 
the arts and sciences-dental program at College Park with advanced standing 
from an accredited college or university, but the last year of the preprofessional 
training must be completed at College Park and the professional training must 
be completed in the School of Dentistry of the University of Maryland. 



< 12 



School of Dentistry 



ARTS-DENTISTRY CURRICULUM 



Freshman Year 



Eng. 1, 2 — Composition and American Literature 
Zool. 1 — General Zoology 
Zool. 2— The Animal Phyla 

Chem. 1, 3 — General Chemistry . 

Math. 10, 11 — Algebra, Trigonometry, Analytic Geometry 

Speech 7 

Physical Activities 

A. S. 1, 2— Basic Air Force ROTC (Men) 

Hea. 2, A — Hygiene (Women) 



—Semester- -> 
1 11 



Total 



3 

4 

4 
3 

1 
2 
2 

17 



4 
4 
3 
2 
1 
2 
2 

19 



Sophomore Year 

Eng. 3, 4 or 5, 6 — Composition and World or English 

Literature 

*Group I Elective 

G. & P. 1 — American Government 

Chem. 35, 36, 37, 38 — Organic Chemistry 

**H. 5, 6 — History of American Civilization 

***Modem Language 

Physical Activities 

A. S. 3, 4— Basic Air Force ROTC (Men) 



Total 



Junior Year 



Modern Language (continued) 

Phys. 10, 11 — Fundamentals of Physics 

Approved Minor Courses 

Electives 



3 


3 


3 






3 


4 


4 


3 


3 


3 


3 


1 


1 


2 


2 


17-19 


17-19 


3 


3 


4 


4 


6 


6 


3 


3 



Total 



16 



16 



Senior Year 



The curriculum of the first year of the School of Dentistry of the University 
of Maryland is accepted by the College of Arts and Sciences as the fourth year 
(major sequence) of academic work toward the degree of Bachelor of Science. 



*Group I Electives: Sociology 1, Philosophy 1, Psychology 1, Economics 37. 

**Students planning to request admission to a Dental School with only two years 
of predental training should take Physics 10-11. 

***Fr. 6, 7 or Ger. 6, 7 (Intermediate Scientific French or German) recommended. 

13 ► 



University of Maryland 

If at the end of the junior year the student decides to postpone his entrance 
to the School of Dentistry and to remain in the College of Arts and Sciences 
and complete work for the Bachelor's degree, he may choose a major and minor 
in any of the departments in which he has completed the necessary underclass 
requirements. The general nature of the first three years of this curriculum and 
the generous electives of the third year make possible for the student a wide 
choice of departments in which he may specialize. In general the electives of 
the third year will be chosen as for a major in some particular department. 

Requirements for Matriculation and Enrollment 

In the selection of students to begin the study of dentistry the School con- 
siders particularly a candidate's proved ability in secondary education and his 
successful completion of prescribed courses in predental collegiate training. The 
requirements for admission and the academic regulations of the College of Arts 
and Sciences, University of Maryland, are strictly adhered to by the School of 
Dentistry. 

A student is not regarded as having matriculated in the School of Dentistry 
until such time as he shall have paid the matriculation fee of $10.00, and is not 
enrolled until he shall have paid a deposit of $200.00. This deposit is intended 
to insure registration in the class and is not returnable. 

Application Procedures 

Candidates seeking admission to the Dental School should write to the Office 
of the Dean requesting an application form. Each applicant should fill out 
the blank in its entirety and mail it promptly, together with the application fee 
and photographs, to the Board of Admissions, Dental School, University of 
Maryland, Baltimore 1, Maryland. The Board of Admissions will acknowledge 
promptly the receipt of the application. If this acknowledgment is not received 
within ten days, the applicant should contact the Board immediately. The 
early filing of an application is urged. Applications may be filed after June 1 
of the year previous to the desired date of admission and during the next nine 
months (to March 1). Applicants wishing advice on any problem relating to 
their predental training or their application should communicate with the Board 
of Admissions. 

All applicants will be required to take the Dental Aptitude Test. This test 
will be given at various testing centers throughout the United States, its pos- 
sessions and Canada. Applicants will be notified by the Council on Dental Edu- 
cation of the American Dental Association of the dates of the tests and the loca- 
tions of the testing centers. 

Promising candidates will be required to appear before the Board of Ad- 
missions for an interview. On the basis of all available information the best 
possible applicants will be chosen for admission to the School. 

A certificate of entrance will be issued to each successful applicant, which 
will permit him to matriculate and to register in the class to which he has applied. 

^ 14 



School of Dentistry 

Admission with Advanced Standing 

(a) Graduates in medicine or students in medicine who have completed two 
or more years in a medical school, acceptable to standards in the School of 
Medicine, University of Maryland, may be given advanced standing to the 
Sophomore year provided the applicant shall complete under competent regular 
instruction the courses in dental technology regularly scheduled in the first year. 

(b) Applicants for transfer must (1) meet fully the requirements for ad- 
mission to the first year of the dental course; (2) be eligible for promotion to 
the next higher class in the school from which he seeks to transfer; (3) have 
no grades below C in the school where transfer credits were earned; (4) show 
evidence of scholastic attainments, character and personality; (5) present letter 
of honorable dismissal and recommendation from the dean of the school from 
which he transfers. 

(c) All applicants for transfer must present themselves in person for an 
interview before qualifying certificate can be issued. 

Attendance Requirements 

In order to receive credit for a full session, each student must have entered 
and be in attendance on the day the regular session opens, at which time lectures 
to all classes begin, and remain until the close of the session, the dates for which 
are announced in the calendar of the annual catalogue. 

Regular attendance is demanded. A student whose attendance in any 
course is unsatisfactory to the head of the department will be denied the privi- 
lege of final examination in any and all such courses. A student with less than 
85 per cent attendance will not be promoted to the next succeeding year. How- 
ever, in certain unavoidable circumstances of absences, the Dean and the Coun- 
cil may honor excuses exceeding the maximum permitted. 

Grading and Promotion 

The following symbols are used as marks for final grades: A (100-91), 
B (90-84), C (83-77), and D (76-70), Passing; F (below 70), Failure; I, In- 
complete. Progress grades in courses are indicated as "Satisfactory" and "Un- 
satisfactory." 

A Failure in any subject may be removed only by repeating the subject in 
full. Students who have done work of acceptable quality in their completed as- 
signments but who, because of circumstances beyond their control, have been 
unable to finish all assignments, will be given an Incomplete. A student shall 
not carry an Incomplete into the next succeeding year. When he has completed 
the requirements for the removal of an Incomplete, the student shall be given 
the actual grade earned in the course. 

Scholastic averages are computed on the basis of semester credits assigned to 
each course and numerical values for grades. The numerical values are A-4; 
B-3; C-2; D-l; F-0. The grade point average is the sum of the products of 
semester credits and grade values, divided by the total number of semester credits. 

15 ► 



University of Maryland 

Students who attain a grade point average of 1.5 in the Freshman year will 
be promoted. At the end of the Sophomore year an overall grade point average 
of 1.75 is required for promotion. A grade point average of 2.0 is required for 
promotion to the Senior year and for graduation. 

Students who fail to meet the minimum grade point averages required for 
promotion and who fall into the following categories will be allowed probationary 
promotion : 

1. Freshmen who attain a grade point average of 1.25-1.49. 

2. Sophomores who attain an overall grade point average of 1.6-1.74. 

3. Juniors who attain an overall grade point average of 1.85-1.99. 

Probationary status will not be permitted for two successive years. 

A student may absolve a total of eight credit hours of failure in an ac- 
credited summer school provided he has the grade point average required for 
promotion or graduation, excluding the failure or failures which he has incurred. 

Equipment 

A complete list of necessary instruments and materials for technic and clinic 
courses is prescribed by the Dental School. Arrangements are made by the 
Dental School in advance of formal enrollment for books, instruments and ma- 
terials to be delivered to the students at the opening of school. Each student is 
required to provide himself promptly with these prescribed necessities. A stu- 
dent who does not meet this requirement will not be permitted to continue with 
his class. 

Deportment 

The profession of dentistry demands, and the School of Dentistry requires, 
of its students evidence of their good moral character. The conduct of the 
student in relation to his work and fellow students will indicate his fitness to 
be taken into the confidence of the community as a professional man. Integrity, 
sobriety, temperate habits, truthfulness, respect for authority and associates and 
honesty in the transaction of business affairs as a student will be considered as 
evidence of good moral character necessary to the granting of a degree. 

Requirements for Graduation 

The degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery is conferred upon a candidate who 
has met the following conditions: 

1. A candidate must furnish documentary evidence that he has attained 
the age of 21 years. 

2. A candidate for graduation shall have attended the full scheduled 
course of four academic years. 

3. He will be required to show a grade point average of 2.0 for the full 
course of study. 

+ 16 



School of Dentistry 

4. He shall have satisfied all technic and clinic requirements of the various 
departments. 

5. He shall have paid all indebtedness to the college prior to the beginning 
of final examinations, and must have adjusted his financial obligations in the 
community satisfactorily to those to whom he may be indebted. 

Student Fees 

Matriculation fee (required of all entering students) $ 10.00 

Tuition (each year): 

Non-resident student 750.00 

Resident student 400.00 

Student health service (each year) 20.00 

Student Union fee 30.00 

The Student Union fee is payable by all students enrolled in 
the Professional Schools on die Baltimore campus and is used to 
pay interest on and amortize the cost of construction of the Union 
Building. 

Special fee 10.00 

The Special fee is payable by all full-time students enrolled in 
the Professional Schools on the Baltimore campus and is used to 
finance equipment for the Union Building. 

Student Activities fee 12.50 

For the purpose of administering various student activities, the 
Student Senate, after approval by the separate classes and the 
Faculty Council, voted a fee of $12.50 to be paid at the time of 
registration. 

Laboratory breakage deposit: 

Freshman year 10.00 

Sophomore and Junior years 5.00 

In addition to fees itemized in the above schedule, the following assess- 
ments are made by the University: 
Application fee (paid at time of filing formal application for admission) 7.50 

Late registration fee 5.00 

(All students are expected to complete their registration, including 
payment of bills, on the regular registration days.) Those who do 
not complete their registration during the prescribed days will be 
charged a fee of $5.00. 

Examinations taken out of class and re-examinations 5.00 

One certified transcript of record is issued free of charge. 

*Each additional copy is issued only upon payment of 1.00 

Summer Session students will pay a $6.00 Student Union Fee but will 
not pay the Special Fee. 

*When more than one copy is requested at the same time, $1.00 is charged 
for the first copy and fifty cents for each additional copy. 

17 ► 



University of Maryland 

Postgraduate Courses 

Postgraduate courses may be offered to qualified dental graduates. These 
courses are designed to provide opportunities for study in special fields on a 
refresher level, and are arranged so that particular emphasis is placed on clini- 
cal practices. 

Graduate Student Fees 

Matriculation Fee (for new students only, non-returnable) .... 10.00 

Tuition Fee (per semester credit hour) 12.00 

Tuition Fee for students carrying ten or more credit hours per 

semester 120.00 

Laboratory Fees where applicable are charged at the rate of $5.00 
per semester hour of laboratory credit. 

Student Union Fee 

Students carrying ten or more credit hours per semester (per 

annum) *30.00 

Students carrying less than ten credit hours per semester (per 

annum) *6.00 

Special Fee 

Students carrying ten or more credit hours per semester (per 

annum) * 10.00 

Graduation Fee 

Master's Degree 10.00 

Doctor's Degree (including hood and microfilming of thesis) . . . 50.00 

REFUNDS 

According to the policy of the University no fees will be returned. In case 
the student discontinues his course or fails to register after a place has been 
reserved in a class, any fees paid will be credited to a subsequent course, but 
are not transferable. 

Registration 

The registration of a student in any school or college of the University 
shall be regarded as a registration in the University of Maryland, but when 
such student transfers to a professional school of the University or from one 
professional school to another, he must pay the usual matriculation fee required 
by each professional school. 



* Students who initially enroll for the second semester of the school year will be 
assessed at the rate of one half of the rates shown above. 

^ 18 



School of Dentistry 

Each student is required to fill in a registration card for the office of the 
Registrar, and make payment of one-half of the tuition fee in addition to all 
other fees noted as payable before being admitted to classwork at the opening 
of the session. The remainder of tuition and fees must be in the hands of the 
Comptroller during registration period for the second half of the academic year. 

Definition of Residence and Non-Residence 

Students who are minors are considered to be resident students if at the 
time of their registration their parents have been domiciled in this state for 
at least one year. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of his 
first registration in the University, and may not thereafter be changed by him 
unless, in the case of a minor, his parents move to and become legal residents 
of the state by maintaining such residence for at least one full year. How- 
ever, the right of the minor student to change from a non-resident to resident 
status must be established by him prior to the registration period for any semes- 
ter. 

Adult students are considered to be residents if at the time of their regis- 
tration they have been domiciled in Maryland for at least one year provided such 
residence has not been acquired while attending any school or college in Mary- 
land or elsewhere. Time spent on active duty in the armed services while sta- 
tioned in Maryland will not be considered as satisfying the one year period 
referred to above except in those cases in which the adult was domiciled in 
Maryland for at least one year prior to his entrance into the armed service and 
was not enrolled in any school during that period. 

The word domicile as used in this regulation shall mean the permanent 
place of abode. For the purpose of this rule only one domicile may be claimed 
as a permanent abode. 

Student Health Service 

The School undertakes to supply medical and surgical care for its students 
through the Student Health Service. This care includes the daily services 
rendered by a physician and a graduate nurse in a well-equipped clinic, conven- 
iently located in the Dental School. Also consultations, surgical procedures and 
hospitalization, judged to be necessary by the Service, are covered under liberal 
limitations, depending on length of hospitalization and special expenses incurred. 

Students who need medical attention are expected to report at the office 
of the Student Health Service. Under circumstances requiring home treatment, 
the students will be visited at their College residences. 

It is not within the scope of the Service to provide medical care for con- 
ditions antedating each annual registration in the University; rior is it the 
function of this Service to treat chronic conditions contracted by students before 
admission or to extend treatment to acute conditions developing in the period 
between academic years or during authorized school vacations. The cost of 

19 ► 



University of Maryland 

orthopedic appliances, the correction of visual defects, the services of special 
nurses, and special medication must be paid for by the student. The School 
does not accept responsibility for illness or accident occurring away from the 
community, or for expenses incurred for hospitalization or medical services in 
institutions other than the University Hospital, or, in any case, for medical 
expense not authorized by the Student Health Service. 

Every new student is required to undergo a complete physical examination, 
which includes oral diagnosis. Any defects noted must be corrected within the 
first school year. The passing of this examination is a requirement for the final 
acceptance of any student. 

Each matriculant must present, on the day of his enrollment, a statement 
from his ophthalmologist regarding the condition of his eyes, and where defects 
in vision exist he shall show evidence that corrections have been made. 

If a student should enter the hospital during the academic year, the Serv- 
ice will arrange for the payment of part or all of the hospital expenses, depending 
on the length of stay and the special expenses incurred. This arrangement ap- 
plies only to students admitted through the office of the School physician. 

Prospective students are advised to have any known physical defects cor- 
rected before entering the School in order to prevent loss of rime which later 
correction might involve. 

Scholarship and Loan Funds 

A number of scholarship loans from various organizations and educational 
foundations are available to students in the School of Dentistry. These loans 
are offered on the basis of excellence in scholastic attainment and the need o» 
the part of students for assistance in completing their course in dentistry. It 
has been the policy of the Faculty to recommend only students in the last two 
years for such privileges. 

The Edward S. Gaylord Educational Endowment Fund 

Under a provision of the will of the late Dr. Edward S. Gaylord, of New 
Haven, Connecticut, an amount approximating $16,000 was left to the Balti- 
more College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, University of Maryland, the 
proceeds of which are to be devoted to aiding worthy young men in securing 
dental education. 



The. W. K. Kellogg Foundation 

During World War II the Foundation recognized the burden that the ac- 
celerated course imposed upon many dental students who under normal cir- 
cumstances would earn money for their education by employment during the 
summer vacation. The Foundation granted to this School a fund to provide 
rotating loans to deserving dental students. 

^ 20 



School of Dentistry 

The Albert A. Harrington Fund 

This fund was established in 1954 by the New Jersey Alumni Association 
in memory of Dr. Albert A. Harrington, a member of the Class of 1910. The 
fund is a source of valuable help in aiding students to solve their temporary 
financial problems. 

The E. Benton Taylor Scholarship 

One of the finest scholarships in the field of dental education, the E. Ben- 
ton Taylor Scholarship was conceived and arranged by Mrs. Taylor and will be 
perpetuated by the Luther B. Benton Company of Baltimore. It was put into 
operation in 1954 and will be awarded annually to a Maryland student of each 
entering class, who will continue to receive its benefits during the four years 
of his dental school course. 

The Student Senate-Alumni Fund 

This fund, created in 1960, was established for the purpose of aiding any 
student of the School who may be in need of an emergency loan. 



GENERAL INFORMATION FOR THE BALTIMORE UNION 

PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTIONS 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

The Baltimore Union for students of the Professional Schools is located 
adjacent to the Professional Schools at 621 West Lombard Street. Accommoda- 
tions for 195 men are provided in a five-story semi-air-conditioned building 
which also contains a cafeteria, fountain lounge, meeting rooms, laundry facul- 
ties, game room, bookstore, barber shop and lounges on each floor. Double 
rooms are available. The rental agreement is made for rooms only; meals are 
served cafeteria style on a cash basis. The contract for accommodations covers 
the academic year. 

ACADEMIC YEAR 

The Rates are: 

$150.00 per semester per double room 

$ 60.00 per six weeks' summer session per double room 

Other: 

$45.00 per month 

Three single rooms are available. They will be assigned on the basis of 

length of residence in The Baltimore Union. 

What the Rate covers: 

The rate shown above is per person and includes the following: 

Room furnishings, bed and cover, mattress, chest of drawers, closet, book 

shelves, desk, medicine cabinet, desk chair and desk lamp. 

21 ► 



University of Maryland 

Maid service will include cleaning of room twice per week and replace- 
ment of change of linen once each week. 

Telephone service is available through the Chesapeake & Potomac Tele- 
phone Company. Cost of the telephone is not included in the room rate. 
Information can be obtained from the Manager's Office. 

Mail service is also provided. 

The resident provides blankets, towels, pillow and linens. Towels and 
linens must be rented through the designated Commercial Rental Service. 

A small amount of luggage space is available. Storage of anything other 
than luggage will not be available. 

TRANSIENTS 

The Rates are: 

$ 4.00 per day 
$24.00 per week 

What the Rate covers: 

The services will include one bath and one face towel, one face cloth, soap 
and change of linen daily (once per week if weekly guest). 

HOW TO APPLY FOR A ROOM ASSIGNMENT 

Write for application form to 

MANAGER'S OFFICE 

The Baltimore Union 

621 West Lombard Street 

Baltimore 1, Maryland 



22 



School of Dentistry 



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24 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 
ANATOMY 

Professor: hahn (hjsad of department). 

Associate Professor: Thompson. 

Assistant Professors: edmond g. vanden bosche, and piavis. 

DRS. JAGIELSKI, LDNDENBERG, LOVEMAN, AND SACHS. 

Anat. 111. Human Gtoss Anatomy. (5-3) 

First year. This course consists of dissection and lectures, supplemented by frequent 
conferences and practical demonstrations. The entire human body is dissected. The 
subject is taught with the purpose of emphasizing the principles of the body structure, 
the knowledge of which is derived from a study of its organs and tissues, and the 
action of its parts. Arrangements can be made to accommodate qualified students 
and dentists interested in research or in making special dissections or topographical 
studies. 

Anat. 112. Human Neuroanatomy. (2) 

First year. Second semester. Prerequisite, Anatomy 111 or equivalent. Neuro- 
anatomy is offered in the Freshman year following Gross Anatomy. The work con- 
sists of a study of the whole brain and spinal cord by gross dissections and micro- 
scopic methods. Correlation is made, whenever possible, with the student's work 
in the histology and physiology of the central nervous system. 

Anat. 113. Comparative Tooth Morphology. (1) 

First year. Second semester. The course treats the evolutionary development of 
dentition as a necessary factor in the study of human oral anatomy. It includes a 
comparative study of the teeth of the animal kingdom, with a comparative study 
of the number, position and form of the teeth. 

For Graduates 

Anat. 211. Human Gross Anatomy. (5-3) 

Same as course 1 1 1 but with additional work on a more advanced level. 

Anat. 212. Human Neuroanatomy. (2) 

Same as course 112 but with additional instruction of a more advanced nature. 

Anat. 214. The Anatomy of the Head and Neck. (3) 

One conference and two laboratory periods per week for one semester. 

Anat. 216. Research. 

Credit determined by amount and quality of work performed. 



BIOCHEMISTRY 

Professor: vanden bosche (head of department). 

MR. MORRIS AND MR. LEONARD. 

Biochem. 111. Principles of Biochemistry. (6) 

First year. Prerequisites inorganic and organic chemistry, with additional training 

in quantitative and physical chemistry desirable. Two lectures and one laboratory 

25 ► 



University of Maryland 

period throughout the year, with one conference period per week during the first 
eight weeks of Semester I. The chemistry of living matter forms the basis of the 
course. The detailed subject matter includes the chemistry of carbohydrates, fats, 
proteins, enzymes, vitamins, and hormones. The processes of respiration, digestion, 
metabolism, secretion and excretion are considered. Laboratory instruction in qualitative 
blood and urine examination is included. 

For Graduates 

Biochem. 211. Advanced Biochemistry. (6) 

Prerequisite Biochemistry 111. Two lectures, one conference and one laboratory 

period throughout the year. 

Biochem. 212. Research in Biochemistry. 
Prerequisite Biochemistry 211. 



DENTAL HISTORY AND LITERATURE 

Professor: Foley. 

Lit. 121 Oral and Written Communication. (2) 

Second year. A formal course of lectures is given in the second year. Many aspects 
of the instruction are given practical application in the third and fourth years. 
The course has many purposes, all of them contributing to the training of the students 
for effective participation in the extra-practice activities of the profession. Particular 
attention is given to instruction in the functioning of the agencies of communication 
in dentistry: the dental societies and the dental periodicals. The practical phases of 
the course include a thorough study of the preparation and uses of oral and written 
composition by the dental student and the dentist; the use of libraries; the com- 
pilation of bibliographies; the collection, the organization, and the use of information; 
the management of dental meetings; the oral presentation of papers, and professional 
correspondence. 

Lit. 141. Thesis. (2) 
Fourth year. 

Lit. 142. Dental History. (1) 

Fourth year. Second semester. Lectures in Dental History describe the beginnings of the 
art of dental practice among ancient civilizations, its advancement in relation to the de- 
velopment of the so-called medical sciences in the early civilizations, its struggle through 
the Middle Ages and, finally, its attainment of recognized professional status in modem 
times. Special attention is given to the forces and stresses that have brought about 
the evolutionary progress from a primitive dental art to a scientific health service 
profession. 

DENTAL PROSTHESIS 

A. Removable Complete and Partial Prosthesis 

Professors: g. w. gaver (head of department) and ramsey. 
Associate Professors: oggesen and warner. 

DRS. GORDON, PRIMROSE, WATSON, WRIGHT AND YENT. 



26 






School of Dentistry 

Pros. 11 la. Dental Materials. (4) 

First year. This course is designed to provide the student with a scientific back- 
ground in the nomenclature, composition, physical properties, practical application, 
and proper manipulation of the important materials used in the practice of dentistry, 
excluding drugs and medicinals. 

The theoretical aspect of the course is presented in the form of lectures, demon- 
strations, informal group discussions, and directed supplemental reading. From 
the practical standpoint, the student manipulates and tests the various materials in 
the laboratory, being guided by prepared project sheets. The student develops an 
understanding of these factors : the importance of scientific testing of a material 
before it is used by the profession at large; the realization that every material has 
its limitations, which can be compensated for only by intelligent application and 
manipulation; and an appreciation of the vast field of research open to those who 
wish to improve the materials now available. 

Pros. 112a. Introduction to Complete Denture Prosthesis. (1) 
First year. Second semester. This course is devoted to the manipulation of impression 
compound and the procedures used in developing impressions of edentulous arches, 
casts and bite plates. It embraces a series of lecture-demonstrations designed to give the 
student a knowledge of the essential fundamentals in complete denture construc- 
tion. 

Pros. 121a. Complete Denture Prosthesis. (2) 

Second year. This course is given by lecture-demonstrations on bite registration, tooth 

arrangement, and final finish of complete dentures. 

Pros. 131a. Basic Clinical Complete Denture Prosthesis. (5) 
Third year. The course includes a study of the practical application in the clinic of 
the fundamentals taught in the preceding years. Demonstrations of the various 
technics of impression and bite taking are offered to provide the student with addi- 
tional knowledge necessary for clinic work. 

Pros. 133a. Introduction to Removable Partial Denture Prosthesis. CO 
Third year. Second semester. This lecture-demonstration course embraces all phases 
of removable partial denture construction. Experiments and exercises are arranged 
to give the student the fundamentals in designing, casting and finishing partial den- 
tures. 

Pros. 141a. Advanced Clinical Denture Prosthesis. (4) 

Fourth year. This course consists of the clinical application of the fundamentals 

taught in the previous years. Particular attention is given to a standard method of 

denture construction to equip the student with a basic technic for use in private 

practice. 

B. Fixed Partial Prosthesis 

Professor: nuttall (head of department). 
Associate Professors: dosh, mc lean-lu and oggesen. 
Assistant Professors: graham and willer. 

DR. STEELE. 

Pros. 122b. Principles of Fixed Partial Prosthesis. (6) 

Second year. This lecture and laboratory course is designed to provide a background 

of fundamental knowledge in fixed partial denture prosthesis. The interrelations 

27 ► 



University of Maryland 

of the biological and mechanical aspects of dentistry are emphasized. The prin- 
ciples involved and the procedures used in abutment preparations, the construction 
of fundamental retainers and pontic sections, and the assemblage of fixed bridge 
restorations are presented in detail and correlated with the requirements of occlusion. 
In addition to these procedures, the technics include impressions, wax manipulation, 
pattern construction, investing and casting. 

Pros. 132b. Ceramic and Plastic Restorations. (2) 

Third year. First semester. This course presents the uses of porcelain and methyl 
methacrylate as restorative materials. Instruction is given in the procedures of 
preparation, impressions, color selection, temporary protection and cementation. These 
materials are employed in the construction of complete veneer crowns and dowel 
crowns and in staining and glazing technics. 

Pros. 134b. Basic Clinical Fixed Partial Prosthesis. (4) 

Third year. This is a comprehensive course in the essential requirements for the 
successful use of the fixed partial denture. Special consideration is given to funda- 
mental factors in diagnosis, treatment planning and clinical procedures. The course 
integrates biological factors, mechanical principles and esthetic requirements with 
restorative treatment. Emphasis is placed on the physiological considerations as a 
basis for fixed partial denture service. 

Pros. 142b. Advanced Clinical Fixed Partial Prosthesis. (3) 
Fourth year. This course provides clinical training and experience for the student. 
The acquired background of knowledge is utilized in rendering treatment services for 
patients. Experience is gained in assessing completely the dental problem, planning 
a practical treatment consistent with the total dental needs and providing services 
which satisfy the objectives of prevention, function and esthetics. 



DIAGNOSIS 

Professor: biddix (head of department). 
Associate Professor: golton. 
Assistant Professor: bryant. 

DRS. HELDRICH, LEBO AND SMITH. 

Diag. 131. Principles of Oral Diagnosis and Treatment Planning. (2) 
Third year. The fundamental principles and procedures in the diagnosis of oral 
and related diseases are studied by intimate clinical observation and discussion of 
interesting cases. The study of the oral cavity through an understanding of its 
relation to other parts of the body is emphasized. By means of consultations with 
other departments the procedures of a comprehensive diagnosis are developed and 
applied in treatment planning. 

Diag. 132. Seminar. 

Third year. The objective of this course is to teach the student to correlate clinical, 
roentgenologic and laboratory findings. Selected patients are presented by both 
medical and dental teachers. 

Diag. 141. Clinical Oral Diagnosis and Treatment Planning. (1) 
Fourth year. This course is a continuation of Diagnosis 131 and 132. 



28 






School of Dentistry 

HISTOLOGY 
Professor: provenza (acting head of department). 

DRS. J. M. FOLEY AND SEIPP. 

Hist. III. Mammalian Histology and Embryology. (8) 

First year. The course embraces the thorough study of the cells, tissues and organs 
of the various systems of the human body. Although certain aspects of the dental 
histology phase of the course are given strictly as special entities, many are in- 
cluded in the instruction in general histology, since the two areas are so intimately 
related when functional and clinical applications are considered. The instruction in 
embryology is correlated with that in histology. It covers the fundamentals of de- 
velopment of the human body, particular emphasis being given to the head and 
facial regions, the oral cavity, and the teeth and their adnexa. Specific correlations 
are also made with the other courses in the dental curriculum. 

For Graduates 

Hist. 212. Mammalian Histology and Embryology. (4-2) 

This course is the same as Histology 111, except that it does not include the dental 
phases of 111, but does include additional instruction and collateral reading of an 
advanced nature. 

Hist. 223. Mammalian Oral Histology and Embryology. (2) 
Prerequisite, Histology 111 or 212, or an equivalent course. This course covers the 
dental aspects of Histology 111, and includes additional instruction in the relations 
of histologic structure and embryologic development of the teeth, their adnexa, and 
the head and facial regions of the human body. 

Hist. 399. Research. 

Number of hours and credit by arrangement. 



MEDICINE 
A. General Medicine 
Associate Professor: mc lean. 

DRS. FRAVEL, LEONARD AND OGDEN. 

Med. 12 la. First Aid. 

Second year. Second semester. In this course the student is instructed in the basic 

principles of first aid. 

Med. 132a. Principles of Medicine. (2) 

Third year. The course is taught by lectures, visual aids and x-ray demonstrations 

of diseases of the cardio-respiratory, gastro-intestinal, genitourinary and nerrous 

systems. 

Med. 14 la. Physical Diagnosis. (1) 

Fourth year. First semester. Slides and clinical demonstrations are used to show the 
methods of recognition of important objective signs as they relate to body disturb- 
ances. The methods of taking blood pressure and its significance, also the recognition 
and treatment of medical emergencies, are taught. 

29 ► 



University of Maryland 

Med. 142a. Principles of Medicine. (2) 4 

Fourth year. Throughout the year the entire class is taken into the hospital for medical 
clinics where the close application of medical and dental knowledge in history taking, 
diagnosis, laboratory procedures and treatment is emphasized. 

Med. 143a. Preventive and Public Health Dentistry. (1) 
Fourth year. Second semester. The objectives of this course are to emphasize those 
measures other than remedial operations that will tend to minimize the occurrence or 
the extension of oral disease, and to outline the status of dentistry in the field of gen- 
eral public health. The relations of dentistry with other phases of public health are 
discussed, as are the problems affecting the administration of dental health programs. 
Special effort is made to demonstrate methods and materials suitable for use in dental 
health education programs. 

Med. 144a. Clinical Conferences. 

Fourth year. Throughout the year small groups of students are taken into the hospital 

for medical ward rounds, demonstrations and discussions. 



B. Oral Medicine 

Associate Professor: abramson. 
Assistant Professor: norms. 

DRS. T. F. CLEMENT AND MC LAUGHLIN. 

Med. 121b. Principles of Endodontics. (1) 

Second year. The lecture phase presents the fundamentals necessary for endodontic 

procedures; the indications and contraindications for these procedures; the methods 

use4 in performing the necessary steps to preserve the functions of the teeth and to 

maintain the health of the individual. The laboratory phase is designed to teach the 

student the materials, the instrumentation, and the techniques employed in endodontic 

treatment. 

Med. 122b. Introduction to Periodontics. (1) 

Second year. The lectures place special emphasis on the importance of oral hygiene 
and its relation to the prevention of all dental disorders. The causes, results, and 
treatment of unhygienic conditions of the oral cavity are fully considered. Demon- 
strations are given in the prophylactic treatment of the mouth and in the accepted 
methods of tooth brushing to be used in home care. In the laboratory the student 
learns on special manikins the use of the periodontal instruments. By progressive 
exercises and drills he is taught the basic principles of good operating procedure and 
the methods of thorough prophylactic treatment. 

Med. 131b. Basic Clinical Endodontics. (1) 

Third year. During the Junior year, the student applies the fundamentals he has 

learned by performing endodontic procedures on clinical cases. 

Med. 132b. Basic Clinical Periodontics. (1) 

Third year. The lectures present the etiology, clinical symptoms, diagnosis, prognosis, 
and methods of treatment of the various forms of periodontal disease, other diseases 
of the oral cavity, and lesions of the lips, cheeks, and tongue. The recognition of 
periodontal disease in its incipient forms and the importance of early treatment are 
stressed. The lectures are well illustrated by color slides, moving pictures, and other 
visual aids. The Junior student is required to apply the fundamentals he has learned 
by performing periodontal procedures on a prescribed number of clinical cases. 

<+ 30 



School of Dentistry 

Med. 14 lb. Advanced Clinical Endodontics. (1) 

Fourth year. During his Senior year the student performs the more advanced endodontic 

procedures on clinical cases. 

Med. 142b. Advanced Clinical Periodontics. (1) 

Fourth year. The Senior student performs the periodontal procedures on clinical 

patients exhibiting the more advanced periodontal problems. 



MICROBIOLOGY 
Professor: shay (head of department). 

MR. BECKER. 

Microbiol. 121. Dental Microbiology and Immunology. (4) 
Second year. First semester. The course embraces lectures, laboratory, demonstra- 
tions, recitations, and group conferences, augmented by guided reading. Practical and 
theoretical consideration is given to pathogenic bacteria, viruses, yeasts and molds. 
Special attention is given to those organisms which cause lesions in and about the 
oral cavity, particularly primary focal infections about the teeth, tonsils, etc., which 
result in the establishment of secondary foci. Immunological and serological prin- 
ciples are studied, with special consideration being given to hypersensitivity resulting 
from the use of antibiotics, vaccines, antigens, and other therapeutic agents. 

Laboratory teaching includes the methods of staining and the cultural charac- 
teristics of microorganisms; their reaction to disinfectants, antiseptics, and germicides; 
methods of sterilization and asepsis; animal inoculation; preparation of sera, vaccines, 
and antitoxins; a study of antibiotics; and a demonstration of virus techniques. In all 
phases of the course emphasis is placed on dental applications. 



For Graduates 

Microbiol. 200, 201. Chemotherapy. (1-2) 

Prerequisite Microbiology 121 or equivalent. One lecture a week. Offered in alter- 
nate years. A study of the chemistry, toxicity, pharmacology and therapeutic value of 
drugs employed in the treatment of disease. 

Microbiol. 202, 203. Reagents and Media. (1, 1) 

One lecture a week. Offered in alternate years. A study of the methods of prep- 
aration and use of bacteriological reagents and media. 

Microbiol. 210. Special Problems in Microbiology. 

Credit determined by amount and quality of work performed. Laboratory course. 

Microbiol. 211. Public Health. (1-2) 

Prerequisite Microbiology 121 or equivalent. Lectures and discussions on the or- 
ganization and administration of state and municipal health departments and private 
health agencies. The course also includes a study of laboratory methods. 

Microbol. 339. Research in Microbiology. 

Credit determined by amount and quality of work performed. 



31 



University of Maryland 

OPERATIVE DENTISTRY 

Professor : meduma (acting head of department). 

Associate Professor: louie. 

Assistant Professors: h. m. clement, c. gaver and edmond g. vanden boschb. 

DRS. BEAVEN, BIANCO, DIAZ, NOFFSINGER AND VELTRE. 

Offer. 111. Tooth Morphology. (3) 

First year. Second semester. This course is designed to teach the form and functions 
and the relationships of the teeth, and includes a study of the nomenclature of sur- 
faces, divisions and relations of the teeth. In the laboratory the student is trained 
in the carving of the various teeth and in die dissection of extracted teeth through 
their various dimensions. 

The second part of the course includes a study of the supporting structures of 
the teeth and of the relation of the teeth to these structures. The periods of begin- 
ning calcification, eruption, complete calcification, and shedding of the deciduous 
teeth; followed by the periods of beginning calcification, eruption, and complete 
calcification of the permanent teeth, are studied and correlated with the growth in 
size of the jaws and face. 

Oper. 121. Fundamentals of Operative Dentistry. (5) 

Second year. The student is trained in the technical procedures of cavity prepara- 
tion and the manipulation of the restorative materials employed in the treatment of 
diseases and injuries of the tooth structure. These basic principles are applied on 
composition teeth and extracted natural teeth. Instruction includes twenty-six lectures 
and forty-eight three-hour laboratory periods. 

Oper. 131. Basic Clinical Operative Dentistry. (4) 

Third year. This course is a continuing development of the fundamentals taught in 
Operative 121. The objective is to present the additional information which is 
necessary for the management of practical cases. Instruction includes lectures, 
demonstrations and clinical practice in which the student treats patients under the 
individual guidance of staff members. 

Oper. 141. Advanced Clinical Operative Dentistry. (6) 

Fourth year. With the background provided by Operative 121 and 131, the student 
is able to comprehend and apply the procedures for treating the more complicated 
operative problems. The objectives of this course are to instruct the student in the 
different procedures by which a comprehensive operative service can be rendered 
and to acquaint him with as many unusual clinical cases as possible. Instruction 
includes lectures, demonstrations, and clinical practice. 

ORTHODONTICS 

Professor: preis (head of department) 

Assistant Professors: cullen, kress, shehan and swinehart. 

DR. DEEMS. 

Ortho. 131. Principles of Orthodontics. (2) 

Third year. The course consists of lectures supplemented by slides and motion pic- 
tures. The subject matter includes the history of orthodontics and the study of 
growth and development, evolution of human dental occlusion, forces of occlusion, 
etiology of malocclusion, aberrations of the maxilla and mandible which affect occlu- 
sion, and tissue changes incident to tooth movement. 

** 32 



School of Dentistry 

Ortho. 141. Clinical Orthodontics. (1) 

Fourth year. Students are assigned in small groups to the Clinic where patients are 
given a thorough dental examination. Under the direction of an instructor each case 
is diagnosed, methods of procedure are explained, and treatment planning is out- 
lined. In the more simple cases therapy is undertaken by the students under the 
supervision of an instructor. Students, therefore, have the opportunity of applying 
clinically the knowledge which they received during their Junior year. 

PATHOLOGY 

Professor: m. s. aisenberg (head of department). 
Associate Professor: Gardner. 
Assistant Professor: a. d. aisenberg. 

DR. GRANRUTH. 

Path. 121. General Pathology. (4) 

Second year. Second semester. The general principles of disease processes and tissue 
reactions, both gross and microscopic, are taught with the objectives of training the 
student to recognize and be familiar with the abnormal and of creating a foundation 
for further study in the allied sciences. Emphasis is placed upon those diseases in 
the treatment of which medicodental relationships are to be encountered. 

Path. 131. Oral Pathology. (3) 

Third year. First semester. The course includes a study of the etiology and the 
gross and microscopic manifestations of diseases of the teeth and their investing 
structures: pathologic dentition, dental anomalies, periodontal diseases, calcific de- 
posits, dental caries, pulpal diseases, dentoalveolar abscesses, oral manifestations of 
systemic diseases, cysts of the jaws, and benign and malignant lesions in and' about 
the oral cavity. 

Path. 141. Seminar. 

Fourth year. This constitutes a part of the cancer teaching program sponsored by a 
grant from the United States Public Health Service. It is conducted by visiting lec- 
turers who are specialists in their respective fields. 

For Graduates 

Path. 211. Advanced Oral Pathology. (8) 

Two lectures and two laboratory periods throughout the year. This course is pre- 
sented with the objective of correlating a knowledge of histopathology with the 
various aspects of clinical practice. Studies of surgical and biopsy specimens are 
stressed. 

Path. 212. Research. 

Time and credit by arrangement. Research in areas of particular interest to the 

student. 

PEDODONTICS 

Associate Professor: sanders. 
Assistant Professor: ehrlich. 

DRS. FERLITA, GIARDINA AND KIHN. 

Ped. 121. Technics of Pedodontics. (1) 

Second year. Second semester. This laboratory course in dentistry for children consists 

33 ► 



University of Maryland 

of eight lectures and sixteen laboratory periods. Demonstrations and visual aids are 
utilized to augment the teaching procedure. The work is performed on model teeth 
in primary dentoforms and consists of exercises in cavity preparation in primary 
teeth for the proper reception of different restorative materials, in the technic of 
restoring a fractured young permanent anterior tooth, and in the construction of a 
basic type of space maintainer. 

Ped. 131. Clinical Pedodontics. (1) 

Third year. The student is introduced to clinical dentistry for children. He utilizes the 
technical procedures learned in the laboratory. Didactic instruction includes sixteen 
lectures offered during the first semester. Emphasis is given to the management of the 
child patient with necessary modifications for behavior problems. The indications and 
contraindications for pulpal therapy are evaluated for the purpose of rational tooth 
conservation. Oral hygiene, roentgenology, growth and development, and caries sus- 
ceptibility tests are taught. Training in preventive orthodontics is given for true 
denture guidance and to allow the student to institute interceptive or early remedial 
measures in incipient deformities. 

The Department endeavors to develop in the student a comprehensive interest 
in guiding the child patient through the period of the mixed dentition. A separate 
clinic, equipped with child-size chairs and supervised by the pedodontics staff, provides 
adequate opportunity for clinical applications of the methods taught in laboratory 
and lectures. 

Ped. 141. Clinical Pedodontics. (1) 

Fourth year. The student continues his clinical training throughout the year and 
is assigned the more difficult cases. In addition, the senior student is assigned to a 
public health clinic which consists of individual, completely equipped operating rooms 
giving the student experience in the management and treatment of the child patient. 

PHARMACOLOGY 

Professor: dobbs (head of department) 
Assistant Professor: ross. 

DR. DOLLE. 

Pharmacol. 131. General Pharmacology and Therapeutics. (4) 
Third year. The course is designed to provide a general survey of pharmacology, 
affording the students the necessary knowledge for the practice of rational therapeutics. 
The course is taught by lectures, laboratory and demonstrations. The first semester 
consists of sixteen hours of didactic work including instruction in the sites and modes 
of drug action, prescription writing, and the pharmacodynamics and therapeutics 
of the local-acting drugs. The second semester consists of thirty-two hours of didactics 
and forty-eight hours of laboratory instruction. The laboratory experiments are per- 
formed on students and on animals and are designed to demonstrate the direct effects 
of drugs on vital tissues. The subject material consists of the pharmacodynamics of the 
systemic-acting drugs and the anti-infective agents. In the therapeutics phase the 
students are instructed in the use of drugs for the prevention, treatment, and correction 
of general and oral diseases. 

Pharmacol. 141. Oral Therapeutics. (1) 

Fourth year. First semester. This course consists of sixteen hours of lectures and 
demonstrations. It is designed to acquaint the students with the practical applications 
of pharmacology in the treatment of dental and oral diseases. Particular emphasis is 

+ 34 



School of Dentistry 

given to the newer drugs and the more recent advances in therapeutics. Patients from 
the dental clinics and the hospital are used for demonstrations whenever possible. 
A correlation of theory with clinical practice is obtained by chairside instruction on 
patients in the dental clinic. 

Pharmacol. 142. Nutritional Therapeutics. (1) 

Fourth year. First semester. This course consists of sixteen hours of lectures and 
demonstrations devoted to the principles and practices of nutritional therapeutics. The 
presentation includes a study of the dietary requirements of essential food substances 
in health and disease. The vitamin and mineral deficiency states with their pathology 
and symptomatology are presented with suggestions for dietary and drug therapy. 
Metabolic diseases are discussed, and their effects on the nutritional states are con- 
sidered. Students are taught to plan diets for patients with various nutritional prob- 
lems, such as those resulting from loss of teeth, the use of new dental appliances, 
dental caries, stomatitis, cellulitis, osteomyelitis, and bone fractures. A project study 
is made by each student which includes analyses of his basal metabolic requirement, 
his total energy requirement, and his dietary intake in relation to his daily needs. 

PHYSIOLOGY 

Professor: white (head of department). 
Associate Professors: shipley and pollack. 

DR. BUXBAUM AND MRS. STALING. 

Physiol. 121. Principles of Physiology. (6) 

Second year. A fundamental objective of this course is to achieve an integration of 

basic scientific phenomena of function as they relate to the organism as a whole. 

Lectures deal with the principal fields of physiology, including heart and circula- 
tion, peripheral and central nervous functions, respiration, digestion, muscular ac- 
tivity, hepatic and renal functions, water and electrolyte balance, special senses, gen- 
eral and cellular metabolism, endocrines and reproduction. In the laboratory work 
(first semester) the classic experiments on frog and turtle muscle and heart function 
are followed by more advanced work on rabbits, cats, dogs and the students them- 
selves. A special series of lectures is devoted to the application of basic physiologic 
principles to human clinical problems. 

For Graduates 

Physiol. 211. Principles of Mammalian Physiology, (6) 

Prerequisite permission from the department. Same as course 121 but with collateral 

reading and additional instruction. 

Physiol. 212. Advanced Physiology. 

Hours and credit by arrangement. Lectures and seminars during the second semes- 
ter. 

Physiol. 213. Research. 

Hours and credits by arrangement. 

PRACTICE ADMINISTRATION 

Professor: bdodix. 

DR. LOVETT AND MR. o'DONNELL. 

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University of Maryland 



Pract. Adm. 141. Principles of Administration. (1) 

Fourth year. Second semester. The objective of this course is to prepare students 
assume the social, economic and professional responsibilities of dental practice. The 
lectures embrace the selection of the office location and office equipment, the basis 
of determining fees, the methods of collecting accounts, the use of auxiliary personnel, 
and the choice of various types of insurance and investments. A comprehensive 
bookkeeping system for a dental office is explained. 

Pract. Adm. 142. Ethics. (1) 

Fourth year. First semester. The course includes lectures on general ethics and 
its basic teachings, and an interpretation of the philosophical principles adopted by 
the American Dental Association and embodied in its "Principles of Ethics." 

Pract. Adm. 143. Jurisprudence. (1) 

Fourth year. First semester. The objective of the course is to acquaint the dental 
student with the fundamentals of law as they relate to the dentist and to his patients. 
The sources of law, and types of courts and court procedures are explained; the 
student is acquainted with the special statutory provisions pertaining to the regula- 
tion of the practice of dentistry, as well as the dentist's responsibilities under the 
criminal law. The respective rights and liabilities of both the dentist and his patients 
are considered in lectures dealing with contracts and torts; practical illustrations of 
these rights and liabilities are reviewed in the light of actual reported cases in the 
courts. 






ROENTGENOLOGY 



Professor: biddix. 

DRS. DARBY AND KLEIN. 



Roentgenol. 131. Principles of Dental Roentgenology. (2) 

Third year. The lectures include a study of the physical principles involved in the 
production of x-rays and a discussion of their properties and effects, the hazards of 
roentgenography to both operator and patient, the technics of taking roentgenograms, 
and the processing of the films. The conference periods deal with the roentgeno- 
graphic study of the normal anatomic structures in health and the variations noted 
under various pathologic conditions. 

Roentgenol. 132. Introduction to Clinical Dental Roentgenology. 
Third year. Second semester. The division of the class into small groups permits 
individual supervision in the clinical application of the material presented in Roent- 
genol. 131. Under guidance the student learns to correctly place, expose and process 
the film and mount a full series of dental roentgenograms. 

Roentgenol. 141. Clinical Dental Roentgenology. (1) 

Fourth year. Under a system of rotating assignments students are placed in constant 
association with the routine practical use of the roentgen ray. They are required to 
master the fundamental scientific principles and to acquire technical skill in taking, 
processing, and interpreting all types of intraoral and extraoral films. 

SURGERY 

Professors: dorsey (head of department), helrich, robdnson and yeager. 

Associate Professor: cappuccio. 

Assistant Professors: siwtnski and inman. 

DRS. HEMPHILL, JOHNSON AND O'CONNELL. 

* 36 



School of Dentistry 

Surg. 131. Anesthesiology. (2) 

Third year. Local anesthesia is taught in both principle and practice. In lectures 
and clinics all types of intraoral, extraoral, conduction and infiltration injections; 
the anatomical relation of muscles and nerves; the theory of action of anesthetic 
agents and their toxic manifestations are taught. Demonstrations are given in con- 
duction and infiltration technics; students give injections under the supervision of an 
instructor. General anesthesia - is taught in lectures and clinic demonstrations. The 
action of the anesthetic agents, methods of administration, indications and contra- 
indications, and the treatment of toxic manifestations are included. Demonstrations 
are given in the preparation of the patient, the administration of all general anes- 
thetics (inhalant, rectal, spinal, and intravenous), and the technics for oral opera- 
tions. Clinics are held in the Department of Oral Surgery in the Dental School and 
in the Hospital. 

Surg. J 32. Oral Surgery. (3) 

Third year. The course consists of lectures on the principles of surgery, the classifica- 
tion of teeth for extraction, and the pre- and postoperative treatment of ambulatory 
patients. The student is assigned to the Department of Oral Surgery on a rotating 
schedule and is required to produce local anesthesia and extract teeth under the 
supervision of an instructor. 

Surg. 141. Oral Surgery. (3) 

Fourth year. This course consists of lectures, clinical assignments, and practical 
demonstrations on the etiology, pathology, diagnosis and treatment of all classes of 
tumors, infections, deformities, anomalies, impacted teeth, fractures and surgical 
problems associated with the practice of dentistry. Hospital clinics, demonstrations 
and ward rounds are given to familiarize the student with abnormal conditions inci- 
dent to the field of his future operations and to train him thoroughly in the diagnosis 
of benign and malignant tumors. Weekly seminars are held in the Hospital. 



Tot Graduates 

Surg. 201. Clinical Anesthesiology. (6) 
Forty hours a week for thirteen weeks. 

Surg. 220. General Dental Oral Surgery. (4) 

Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week for one semester. 

Surg. 221. Advanced Oral Surgery. (4) 

Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week for one semester. 

Surg. 222. Research. 

Time and credit by arrangement. 



VISUAL AIDS IN TEACHING 

MR. TAYLOR AND STAFF. 

The Department of Visual Aids employs the latest photographic technics 
and equipment for the production of both monochromatic and full-color still 
and motion pictures. By cooperation with other departments new material is 
developed for lectures, clinics, publications and exhibits. 



37 ► 



University of Maryland 

Through photography the School retains for teaching purposes interesting 
cases that appear in the clinics, preserves evidence of unusual pathological 
cases, and records anatomical anomalies, facial disharmonies and malocclusions 
of the teeth. In addition the student, through his contact with photographic 
uses, becomes acquainted with the value of photography in clinical practice. 
Students are advised as to the use of visual aids in the preparation of lectures 
and theses, the arrangement and co-ordination of materials, and the organiza- 
tion and maintenance of records and histories. 

Various art media and the use of modern plastics supplement photography. 
By the combination and correlation of these methods all departments are pro- 
vided with an unlimited supply of valuable and often irreplaceable visual 
aids. 

A closed circuit television system is used to enable large groups to visualize 
clinical and laboratory procedures. Close-up pictures of the various operations 
are made possible for comfortable viewing in lecture hall and laboratory. 



SPECIAL COURSES 

Summer Courses 

As the need arises, summer courses may be offered in certain subjects in- 
cluded in the regular curriculum. A charge of $12.00 for each semester hour 
credit is made for these courses. 



The Gorgas Odontological Society 

The Gorgas Odontological Society was organized in 1916 as an honorary 
student dental society with scholarship as a basis for admission. The Society 
was named after Dr. Ferdinand J. S. Gorgas, a pioneer in dental education, a 
teacher of many years' experience, and during his life a great contributor to 
dental literature. It was with the idea of perpetuating his name that the 
Society adopted it. 

To be eligible for membership a student must be in the first 30 per cent of 
his class. The selection of this 30 per cent shall be based on the weighted 
percentage average system as outlined in the school regulations. The meetings, 
held once each month, are addressed by prominent dental and medical men, an 
effort being made to obtain speakers not connected with the University. The 
members have an opportunity, even while students, to hear men associated with 
other educational institutions. 

Omicron Kappa Upsilon 

Phi Chapter of Omicron Kappa Upsilon, honorary dental society, was char- 
tered at the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, University of 
Maryland during the session of 1928-29. Membership in the society is 

<* 38 



School of Dentistry 

awarded to a number not exceeding 12 per cent of the graduating class. This 
honor is conferred upon students who through their professional course of 
study creditably fulfill all obligations as students, and whose conduct, earnest- 
ness, evidence of good character and high scholarship recommend them to 
election. 

The following graduates of the 1960 Class were elected to membership: 

Joel Martin Adler Bernard John Orlowski 

Hulon Edward Beasley Helmer Eugene Pearson 

Rolla Ray Burk, Jr. James Vincent Picone 

Robert A. Cialone Malcolm Louis Rosenbloum 

John J. Denson, Jr. David M. Solomon 

David William Heese Wayne Eugene Stroud 



Alumni Association 

The first annual meeting of the Society of the Alumni of the Baltimore 
College of Dental Surgery was held in Baltimore, March 1, 1849. This organi- 
zation has continued in existence to the present, its name having been changed 
to The Alumni Association of the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental 
School, University of Maryland. 

The officers to the Alumni Association for 1960-61 are as follows: 

President President Elect 

Daniel F. Lynch Joseph P. Cappuccio 

1401 16th Street, N. W. 1010 St. Paul Street 

Washington 6, D. C. Baltimore 2, Maryland 

First Vice President Second Vice President 

E. Milburn Colvin, Jr. Charles B. Ledbetter 

1726 21st Street, N. W. Byron Building (Cameron Village) 

Washington 9, D. C. Raleigh, North Carolina 

Past President (Ex-Officio') Secretary 

Harry W. F. Dressel, Jr. Calvin J. Gaver 

6340 Frederick Avenue 1427 Kirkwood Road 

Baltimore 28, Maryland Baltimore 7, Maryland 

Treasurer Editor 

Howard Van Natta Kyrle W. Preis 

Medical Arts Building 700 Cathedral Street 

Baltimore 1, Maryland Baltimore 1, Maryland 

Historian-Librarian 

Milton B. Asbell 

25 Haddon Avenue 

Camden 3, New Jersey 

39 ► 



University of Maryland 

University Alumni Council Representatives 

Samuel H. Bryant, 1961 Harry Levin, 1962 

Baltimore, Maryland Baltimore, Maryland 

Edward D. Stone, 1963 
Baltimore, Maryland 

EXECUTIVE COUNCIL 

Daniel F. Lynch Kyrle W. Preis 

Washington, D. C. Baltimore, Maryland 

Howard Van Natta Harry W. Dressel, Jr. 

Baltimore, Maryland Baltimore, Maryland 

Calvin J. Gaver E. Milburn Col vent, Jr. 

Baltimore, Maryland Washington, D. C. 

Joseph P. Cappuccio Charles B. Ledbetter 

Baltimore, Maryland Raleigh, North Carolina 

Milton B. Asbell 
Camden, New Jersey 

ELECTED MEMBERS 

Executive Council 

Philip L. Block J. Philip Norris 

Baltimore, Maryland Baltimore, Maryland 

Melvin Hazen Colvin Eugene A. Leatherman 

Washington, D. C. Randallstown, Maryland 

L. Lynn Emmart Benjamin A. Williamowsky 
Baltimore, Maryland Silver Spring, Maryland 

ENDOWMENT FUND 

TRUSTEES EX-OFFICIO 

Daniel F. Lunch, President 

Joseph P. Cappuccio, President Elect 

Calvin J. Gaver, Secretary 

Howard Van Natta, Treasurer 

Myron S. Aisenberg, Dean 

ELECTED TRUSTEES 

W. Paul Hoffman, 1961 James W. McCarl, 1961 

Washington, D. C. Greenbelt, Maryland 

Arthur I. Bell, 1962 Ashur G. Chavoor, 1962 

Baltimore, Maryland Washington, D. C. 

Peter T. Kanelos, 1963 Jesse Tracer 

Providence, Rhode Island Baltimore, Maryland 

^ 40 



School of Dentistry 



SENIOR PRIZE AWARDS 

The following prizes were awarded to members of the Senior Class for the 
1959-60 Session: 

The Alexander H. Paterson Memorial Medal 

For Practical Set of full Upper and Lower Dentures 

CHARLES ALBERT DARBY 



Honorable Mention 



Edgar C. White 



The Isaac H. Davis Memorial Medal 

(Contributed by Dr. Leonard I. Davis) 

for Cohesive Gold Filling 

EDWIN BARRY SHILLER 
Honorable Mention Gene Edward Camp 

The Alumni Association Medal 

For Thesis 
JAMES VINCENT PICONE 

The Harry E. Kelsey Award 

(Contributed by former associates of Dr. Kelsey: 

Drs. Anderson, Devlin, Hodges, Johnston and Preis) 

For Professional Demeanor 

FRANK LEE BRAGG 

The Harry E. Latcham Memorial Medal 

For Complete Oral Operative Restoration 

WAYNE EUGENE STROUD 

Honorable Mention Joel Martin Adler 

The Edgar J. ]acques Memorial Award 

For Meritorious Work in Practical Oral Surgery 

FRANK LEE BRAGG 

The Herbert Friedherg Memorial Award 

(Contributed by the New Jersey Alumni Chapter of the 

National Alumni Association) 

For Achievement hy a New Jersey Senior 

DAVID M. SOLOMON 

The Katharine Toomey Plaque 

(Contributed by Dr. and Mrs. Lewis C. Toomey) 

For Devotion to the School and to the Profession 

THEODORE JACOB NOFFSINGER, JR. 

The Timothy O. Heatwole Chair 

To the Senior Who Has Best Exemplified the Qualities 

of Ethical Standards, Kindnesses and Humanitarianism 

HULON EDWARD BEASLEY 

41 ► 



University of Maryland 



The Alpha Omega Scholarship Plaque 

For Proficiency in the Course of Study 

JOHN J. DENSON, JR. 

The Sigma Epsilon Delta Memorial Medal 

For Highest Average in Basic Sciences 

JOHN J. DENSON, JR. 



Honors 

University Gold Medal for Scholarship, Summa Cum Laude 
Awarded to 

John J. Denson, Jr. 

Certificates of Honor, Magna Cum Laude 
Awarded to 

David M. Solomon Rolla Ray Burk, Jr. 

Hulon Edward Beasley Helmer Eugene Pearson 

Robert A. Cialone 

Cum Laude 

Joel Martin Adler James Vincent Picone 

David William Heese Malcolm Louis Rosenbloum 

Bernard John Orlowski Wayne Eugene Stroud 

Degree Conferred August 1, 1960 

John William Biehn, University of Maryland Maryland 

Alfred Chesler, Furman University West Virginia 

Milton Chipman Clegg, B.A., University of Utah, 1956 Utah 

Raymond Dzoba, Bowling Green State University New Jersey 

Irwin KolikofT, B.S., Florida Southern College, 1953 New Hampshire 

Richard Franklin Murphy, West Virginia University West Virginia 

Raymond Francis Waldron, A.B., Boston College, 1956 Massachusetts 



42 






School of Dentistry 

Graduating Class 

1959-1960 Session 

Joel Martin Aciler, Emory University Mississippi 

John Jacob Atchison, Marshall College West Virginia 

Edmund Donald Baron, Rutgers University New Jersey 

Hulon Edward Beasley, University of Florida Maryland 

Raymond Cline Bodley, West Virginia University West Virginia 

William Francis Brady, Jr., B.S.^ Boston College, 1954; M.S., 

University of Massachusetts, 1956 Massachusetts 

Frank Lee Bragg, West Virginia University West Virginia 

James Peter Brown, B.A., American International College, 1956. Massachusetts 
Rolla Ray Burk, Jr., A.B., West Virginia University, 1951 West Virginia 

Gene Edward Camp, West Virginia University West Virginia 

Robert Roy Chesney, Western Maryland College Maryland 

Robert A. Cialone, B.S., University of Maryland, 1955 New Jersey 

William John Cimikoski, A.B., University of Michigan, 1953 Connecticut 

Clyde Albert Coe, University of Maryland Maryland 

Blanca Collazo, B.S., University of Puerto Rico, 1956 Puerto Rico 

Frank Lateau Collins, West Virginia University West Virginia 

Myron Harris Coulton, University of Florida Florida 

Thomas Joseph Cronin, B.S., De Paul University, 1955 New Jersey 

William Walter Cwiek, B.S., University of Maryland, 1953 Maryland 

Charles Albert Darby, University of Maryland Maryland 

Charles Albert Dean, B.A., Providence College, 1956 Massachusetts 

John Jay Denson, Jr., B.S., University of Florida, 1956 Florida 

Michael Vincent Doran, Jr., B.S., University of Miami, 1956 Virginia 

Morton Mayer Ehudin, B.S., University of Maryland, 1957 Maryland 

Joseph Thomas Fay, B.A., Providence College, 1956 Rhode Island 

Humbert Michael Fiskio, A.B., Oberlin College, 1955; M.A., 

University of Connecticut, 1956 Connecticut 

Henry Paul Fox, St. Michael's College New York 

Irwood Fox, B.A., University of Virginia, 1956 Virginia 

Joseph Giardina, B.S., University of Maryland, 1957 Maryland 

Harry Gruen, University of Miami Florida 

Ernest Lee Harris, Jr., Southern Missionary College Florida 

David William Heese, B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1953. . . Maryland 

Sanford Sonny Hochman, B.S., University of Maryland, 1957 Maryland 

Clemuel Mansey Johnson, B.A., The University of North Carolina, 1953 

North Carolina 

Nicholas Irving Jones, B.S., The Citadel, 1956 South Carolina 

Norman Lewis Jones, Marshall College West Virginia 

Alan Donald Jung, B.S., University of Maryland, 1952 Maryland 

Don Samuel Killpack, B.S., University of Utah, 1951 Utah 

Don Lee Koubek, A.B., West Virginia University, 1955 West Virginia 

Robert Marvin Kriegsman, A.B., The University of North Carolina, 1957 

North Carolina 

43 ► 



University of Maryland 

Scot Sueki Kubota, A.B., Colorado State College, 1953; 

A.M., 1954 Hawaii 

Nicholas Lasijczuk, Ch.D., University of Nancy New York 

Richard John Lauttman, B.S., Loyola College, 1953 Maryland 

Martin Albert Levin, B.S., University of Maryland, 1957 Maryland 

Marvin Paul Levin, B.S., University of Maryland, 1957 Maryland 

Harry Levy, University of Maryland Maryland 

William Lee Lovem, Concord College West Virginia 

Frederick Magaziner, B.S., University of Maryland, 1954 Maryland 

Martin Magaziner, University of Maryland District of Columbia 

Frank William Mastrola, Jr., B.A., Providence College, 1956 . Rhode Island 

Martin Lee Mays, B.S., Wofford College, 1957 South Carolina 

David Henry McLane,. A.B., Marshall College, 1957 West Virginia 

John Stephen McLaughlin, West Virginia University Maryland 

John Bennett Moore, Jr., Weber College Utah 

Theodore Jacob Noffsinger, Jr., B.A., University of Maryland, 1956 Maryland 
Franklin Lewis Oliverio, B.S., West Virginia University, 1956 . West Virginia 

Billy Wendel Olsen, B.A., University of California, 1955 California 

Bernard John Orlowski, Seton Hall University New Jersey 

Philip Kibbee Parsons, West Virginia University West Virginia 

Helmer Eugene Pearson, Upsala College New Jersey 

Alfred John Phillips, University of Florida Florida 

James Vincent Picone, B.S., College of the Holy Cross, 1956 Massachusetts 

Robert Henry Prindle, B.A., St. Michael's College, 1956 New York 

Anthony Joseph Regine, B.S., Tufts College, 1955 Rhode Island 

Jude Philip Restivo, B.S., University of Maryland, 1956 Maryland 

Ronald Lee Ripley, A.B., West Virginia University, 1955 West Virginia 

Malcolm Louis Rosenbloum, Emory University Missouri 

Georges Philippe Raynald Roy, A.B., St. Michael's College, 1956 Maine 

William Joseph Rumberger, Mount Saint Mary's College Pennsylvania 

Thomas Melvin Rutherford, B.S., West Virginia Wesleyan College, 1956 

West Virginia 

Frank John Salino, The University of Buffalo New York 

Lawrence Francis Schaefer, St. Michael's College New York 

Roger Clare Sears, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

Howard Irwin Segal, University of Miami Florida 

Edwin Barry Shiller, Emory University Florida 

Joseph James Smith, Mount Saint Mary's College New York 

Robert Carroll Smith, A.B., West Virginia University, 1956 West Virginia 

Alvin Jerome Snyder, B.S., University of Maryland, 1956 Maryland 

David M. Solomon, B.S., Fordham University, 1956 New Jersey 

Rudolph Clement Strambi, B.S., Fordham University, 1952 New Jersey 

Wayne Eugene Stroud, University of Maryland Illinois 

George Webster Struthers, Jr., B.S., Randolph-Macon College, 1952 

West Virginia 

Edward Ralph Thompson, Temple University New Jersey 

Robert Speirs Thomson, B.A., Houghton College, 1956 New Jersey 

Earle Alexander Tompkins, Jr., B.S., University of Massachusetts, 1955 

Massachusetts 

<< 44 



School of Dentistry 

Gilbert Allen Vitek, Graceland College Maryland 

Martin Truett Watson, A.B., Emory University, 1954 Georgia 

Irwin Robert Weiner, University of Akron Ohio 

Wayne Clark Wills, West Virginia University West Virginia 

Charles Rosser Wilson, B.S., Wake Forest College, 1956 North Carolina 

Dale Lee Wood, Western Maryland College Maryland 

Louis Yarid, A.B., Columbia University, 1956 Massachusetts 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 

1960-1961 Session 
Senior Class 

Paul Wilfred Achin, Providence College Massachusetts 

Earl Robert Alban, Jr., B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1954. . . Maryland 

Morris Antonelli, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 District of Columbia 

Gilbert Samuel Berman, B.S., University of Maryland, 1957 Maryland 

Cecil Samuel Boland, B.S., Newberry College, 1957 Maryland 

Lester Malcolm Breen, Emory University Georgia 

Donald Acker Michael Brown, B.A., St. John's College 1951 Maryland 

Douglas Adams Bryans, B.S., Springfield College, 1957 Massachusetts 

George Franklin Buchness, B.S., Loyola College, 1948; M.S., Catholic 

University, 1954 Maryland 

Richard Mario Carmosino, A.B., Boston University, 1957 Massachusetts 

Thomas J. Cavanaugh, B.S., University of Maryland, 1957 Maryland 

Lawrence Leo Clark, Mount Saint Mary's College New Jersey 

James Richard Crouse, Shepherd College Maryland 

Billy Hugh Darke, B.S., Western Kentucky State College, 1954 Kentucky 

William Lawrence Doheny, Jr., University of Maryland Connecticut 

Edward Cornelius Doherty, B.A., Boston College, 1957 Massachusetts 

Marlin Duane Dunker, B.A., Walla Walla College, 1955 California 

William Duane Fitzgerald, University of Massachusetts Massachusetts 

Sheldon Donald Fliss, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

Richard Arnold Foer, B.S., University of Maryland, 1957. District of Columbia 

Joseph Edward Furtado, B.A., Providence College, 1954 Rhode Island 

William Joseph Girotti, B.A., American International College, 1957 

Massachusetts 
Raymond Emil Goepfrich, B.S., Franklin and Marshall College, 1957 

Pennsylvania 
John George Goettee, Jr., B.A., Western Maryland College, 1957. . . Maryland 

Melvin Goldenberg, B.A., Providence College, 1957 Rhode Island 

Aaron Rufus Griffith, Jr., University of South Carolina South Carolina 

Sheldon Gerald Gross, University of Vermont Massachusetts 

Stanford Edgar Hamburger, B.A., University of Maryland, 1957 . . Maryland 

Arnold Hecht, University of Miami Florida 

Ronald Wesley Higel, University of Florida Florida 

William Paul Hoffman, Jr., Earlham College District of Columbia 

45 ► 



University of Maryland 

Edward Allen Hurdle, Jr., B.S., Loyola College, 1956 Maryland 

Patrick Francis Iacovelli, Jr., B.S., Boston College, 1952 Massachusetts 

Ronald Harold Israel, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

Alvin Wesley Kagey, B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1957 Maryland 

Sanford Katsumi Kamezawa, University of California Hawaii 

Stanley Paul Kaminski, B.A., Seton Hall University, 1957 New Jersey 

Douglas Kaplan, B.A., Alfred University, 1957 New Jersey 

George Theodore Keary, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958. . . Massachusetts 
Michael Edward Kolakowski, Jr., B.S., University of Maryland, 1957 

Maryland 

Robert George Kovack, B.S., Albright College, 1957 New Jersey 

Ralph Leonard Kroopnick, B.A., University of Connecticut, 1957. .Connecticut 

Robert Maurice Lattanzi, Albertus Magnus College Connecticut 

Jack Edward Liller, University of Richmond Maryland 

Arnold Irvin Loew, University of Miami Florida 

Sol Benjamin Love, Georgetown University District of Columbia 

Edward Salters McCallum, Newberry College South Carolina 

William Edward McLaughlin, Mount Saint Mary's College New York 

Joseph Robert Marchesani, LaSalle College New Jersey 

Richard Madison Marrone, B.S., University of Maryland, 1957 Maryland 

Alan J. Martin, Ohio University Florida 

Robert Cameron Mason, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

Michael Charles Matzkin, B.A., Dartmouth College, 1957 Connecticut 

Robert Francis Meier, Mount Saint Mary's College New York 

Marc Julian Meyers, B.A., Western Maryland College, 1957 Maryland 

Ronald Britton Morley, B.A., Maryville College, 1957 New York 

Clarence John Myatt, A.B., St. Michael's College, 1957 Massachusetts 

Roy Mitsuaki Naito, B.A., University of Hawaii, 1956 Hawaii 

Antone Travers Oliveria, Jr., B.S., Tufts College, 1957 Massachusetts 

James Edward Palmer, University of Maryland Maryland 

David Bertram Pere, University of Miami Florida 

Albert Perlmutter, A.B., Boston University, 1957 Massachusetts 

Garr Thomas Phelps, Xavier University Kentucky 

Joseph Michael Pistoria, Seton Hall University New Jersey 

Erwin Stuart Raffel, B.S., University of Maryland, 1956 Maryland 

Malcolm Sidney Renbaum, B.S., Johns Hopkins University, 1956. . . Maryland 

John Filmore Robinson, Loyola College Maryland 

William Otis Rockefeller, B.S., University of Maryland, 1961 New York 

Theodore Almada Rosa, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 

District of Columbia 
Victor Angel Rosado, B.A., Polytechnic Institute of Puerto Rico, 1957 

Puerto Rico 

David Neuman Rudo, B.S., University of Maryland, 1957 Maryland 

Peter Paul Ryiz, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 Connecticut 

Richard Daniel Sachs, University of Miami Florida 

Hershel Garvin Sawyer, A.B., Berea College, 1957 West Virginia 

Robert Stanley Siegel, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

Frank Joseph Sinnreich, Jr., B.S., University of Maryland, 1951 . Maryland 



46 



School of Dentistry 

Melvin Jordan Slan, B.S., University of Maryland, 1960 Maryland 

Louis Edward Snyder, Jr., B.S., University of Maryland, 1959. South Carolina 

James Miller Steig, Georgia Institute of Technology Florida 

Stanley Merrill Stoller, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

Arthur Hein Streeter, B.S., Washington College, 1957 Maryland 

Joseph Ashley Sullivan, University of Miami Florida 

Brett Taylor Summey, B.A., University of North Carolina, 1957 

North Carolina 

John Harvey Swann, B.S., University of Maryland, 1956 Maryland 

Jerry Dale Taft, B.S., University of Maryland, 1961 Montana 

Bill Edward Taylor, University of Oklahoma Oklahoma 

Paul Irvin Teitelbaum, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

Donald Mathews Tilghman, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958. . . Maryland 

George Bartholomew Towson, Washington College Maryland 

Norton Allen Tucker, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

Nils Glick Wallen, B.A., Syracuse University, 1957 New Jersey 

Frederic James Wasserman, B.E., University of Florida, 1957 Florida 

Alfred Stewart Windeler, Jr., Johns Hopkins University New Jersey 

William Herbert Witherspoon, West Virginia University Pennsylvania 

Larry Emanuel Wynne, Emory University Florida 

Stanley Leonard Zakarin, University of Florida Florida 

John Francis Zulaski, B.A., American International College, 1957. Connecticut 

Junior Class 

Frederick Bradshaw Abbott, Southeast Missouri State College Maryland 

Tulio Fulvio Albertini, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

James Emil Andrews, B.S., Wake Forest College, 1958 North Carolina 

Robert Apfel, B.A., University of Miami, 1958 Florida 

Marvin Bennet Apter, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

Joseph Herman Axelrod, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

Michael Alan Balenson, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

Donald Harry Barnes, College of the Pacific California 

Howard Benjamin Berman, Emory University Florida 

Samuel Blum, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 District of Columbia 

William John Bowen, B.S., University of Maryland, 1957; M.S., 1959 

Maryland 

Roger Lee Brown, University of Maryland Pennsylvania 

Peter John Buchetto, Jr., University of Connecticut Connecticut 

Barry Stanley Buchman, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

Paul William Bushman, B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1958 Maryland 

Robert Moore Charlton, B.S., University of Maryland, 1960 Maryland 

George Gary Clendenin, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

David Constantinos, B.A., American International College, 1957. Massachusetts 

William Howard Dickson, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

Albert William Doetzer, B.S., Loyola College, 1958 Maryland 

Richard Farish Downes, Jr., B.S., University of Maryland, 1953 Maryland 

John Theodore Drescher, B.A., University of Connecticut, 1958 Connecticut 

47 ► 



University of Maryland 

Alvin Engel, University of Maryland Maryland 

Henry Anthony Fischer, B.S., University of Florida, 1958 Florida 

James Scott Foulke. B.S., University of Maryland, 1956 Maryland 

Neil Arthur Friedman, University of Southern California California 

Richard Saul Friedman,. A.B., Rutgers University, 1957 New Jersey 

Thomas Brent Gable, Franklin and Marshall College Pennsylvania 

Charles Augustus Gallagher, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959. . . Maryland 
Lawrence Allan Gallerani, B.A., American International College, 1958 

Massachusetts 

Ronald Irvin Glaeser, B.A., Western Maryland College, 1958 Maryland 

Milton Josef Glatzer, A.B., Rutgers College, 1958 New Jersey 

Marshall Robert Goldman, B.S., University of Maryland, 1960. . . Maryland 
George Joseph Goodreau, Jr., A.B., St. Anselm's College, 1953. New Hampshire 

Robert Gordon, A.B., Boston University, 1958 Massachusetts 

Larry Earl Grace, B.S., Concord College, 1956 West Virginia 

Robert Duane Hackney, B.S., The State College of Washington, 1959 

Washington 
Lawrence Frank Halpert, B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1958 Maryland 

Laurence Eugene Johns, Shepherd College Maryland 

James Paul Johnson, B.S., Mount Saint Mary's College, 1958 Pennsylvania 

Laddie Lynn Jones, B.S., Presbyterian College, 1958 South Carolina 

David Brainard Kirby, Jr., B.A., University of Pennsylvania, 1958 Pennsylvania 

Martin Kline, Emory University Florida 

Richard Thomas Koritzer, The Johns Hopkins University Maryland 

Robert Alan Kramer, Lafayette College New Jersey 

Daniel Levy, Emory University Georgia 

Donald Eugene Lilley, Southern Missionary College Maryland 

Berton Abner Lowell, University of Miami Florida 

Sidney Samuel Markowitz, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

Joseph David Mechanick, University of Maryland Maryland 

Stephen Mark Millison, University of Maryland Maryland 

Stephen Hollingshead Mills, University of Florida Florida 

Alan Tatsuo Miyamoto, B.A., Simpson College, 1958 Hawaii 

Kermit Lee Norton, Fresno State College California 

Harvey Sheldon Pallen, University of Florida Florida 

Robert Parker, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

Allan Buckner Pertnoy, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

Gerald Alan Pinsky, University of Miami Florida 

Albert Louis Pizzi, B.S., Springfield College, 1958 Massachusetts 

Leo Rabago, Jr., Fresno State College California 

Sylvan Rankin, B.S., University of Maryland, 1960 Maryland 

Paul Francis Regan, B.A., Boston College, 1958 Massachusetts 

Donald Arthur Romeo, A.B., St. Anselm's College, 1956 Massachusetts 

Lee Howard Roper, B.S., University of Maryland, 1960 New Hampshire 

Jack Arnold Roth, West Virginia University Maryland 

Howard Leslie Rothschild, University of Maryland Maryland 

David Rubin, University of Miami Florida 

Howard Frederick Rudo, B.A., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 



48 



School of Dentistry 

Joseph Anthony Salvo, Jr., B.S., Tufts College, 1958 Massachusetts 

Earle Milton Schulz, Jr., B.S., University of Maryland, 1960 Maryland 

Howard Erwin Schunick. University of Maryland Maryland 

Frank Lewis Schwartz, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

Allen Hirch Simmons, A.B., Fresno State College, 1955 California 

Reed Campbell Snow, University of Utah Utah 

Theodore Sheldon Sobkov, B.A., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

Irvin Murray Sopher, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

Dennis Martin Sullivan, B.A., Belmont Abbey College, 1960 South Carolina 

John Thomson, III, B.S, Houghton College, 1960 New Jersey 

Alan Jay Trager, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

Lamar Gordon Warren, Jr., University of Florida Florida 

Robert William Warson, B.S., Loyola College, 1958 Maryland 

Jerome Jacob Weinstein, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

John Charles Wilhelm, A.B., Western Maryland College, 1953 Maryland 

Rex Patrick Wood, B.S., The State College of Washington, 1958 . Washington 
David Ansel Young, Whittier College California 

Sofhomore Class 

Richard Paul Beimler, A.B., Gettysburg College, 1955 New York 

Frank Melcon Benneyan, A.B., Fresno State College, 1959 California 

John David Bimestefer, A.B., Duke University, 1959 Maryland 

David Wayne Bishop, Newberry College South Carolina 

Leonard Donald Blumson, B.S., University of Miami, 1957 Maryland 

Robert Jack Burt, B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1959 Maryland 

Carl Michael Caplan, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

James McCormick Carew, B.A., St. Anselm's College, 1959. New Hampshire 

Ronald Albert Carter, A.B., Fresno State College, 1958 California 

Earl LeRoy Chambers, Jr., B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 . . Maryland 

Dale Richard Collins, University of Pittsburgh Pennsylvania 

Frank Costabile, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 New Jersey 

Thomas Michael Darrigan, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959. . . New York 

Renato Patrick DeSantis, A.B., Loyola College, 1958 Maryland 

Gene Watkins Eng, B.A., Emory University, 1959 Florida 

William Bernard Finagin, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

Michael Alan Fine, A.B., Catawba College, 1959 New York 

Robert Pacy Fleishman, Loyola College Maryland 

Stanley Berle Foxman, B.A., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

Leon Friedman, B.A., Lehigh University, 1959 New Jersey 

Franklin F. Frush, B.A., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

Richard Anthony Gallagher, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 . Maryland 

Francis Xavier Geczik, B.S., Iona College, 1959 New York 

Peter Lewis Goldstone, A.B., Harvard College, 1959 New York 

Leroy Goren, University of Maryland Maryland 

Herbert Gottlieb, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

Mark Lee Govrin, University of Maryland New Jersey 

William Herbert Griswold, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 New Jersey 

49 ► 



University of Maryland 

John Estyle Hanson, B.S., Shepherd College, 1959 Maryland 

Wilberto Francisco Hernandez- Vales, B.S., University of Puerto Rico, 1959 

Puerto Rico 

Stanley Elliott Hyatt, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

Carl Winston Irwin, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

Ralph William Jacobson, Emory University Florida 

William Carl Jennette, Jr., B.S., Wake Forest College, 1959 Maryland 

Dean Clyde Johnson, University of Utah Utah 

Robert Allen Katz, B.S., Boston College, 1959 Massachusetts 

Clayton Edward King, B.A., Providence College, 1959 Massachusetts 

Donald Raymond King, University of Florida Florida 

Earl Ephraim Klioze, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

Herbert Mark Koenigsberg, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

Stanley Louis Kolker, University of Maryland Maryland 

George Andrew Kraft, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 Pennsylvania 

George Krupinsky, Jr., B.A., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

Paul Max Ladd, University of Miami Florida 

Richard Joseph Landino, B.A., Providence College, 1959 Connecticut 

Stuart Theodore Landsman, B.S., Queens College, 1959 New York 

Delia Ruth Looper, B.A., Longwood College, 1959 Virginia 

Lorin George Maser, University of Maryland District of Columbia 

Martin Bruce Millison, B.A., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

Harry Charles Mullins, Concord College West Virginia 

Martin Neil Narun, B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1958 Maryland 

Jerome William Newman, B.A., The Citadel, 1959 Florida 

David Bennett Nuckols, B.A., University of Tennessee, 1949 Kentucky 

George William Oatis, Jr., University of Maryland Connecticut 

Samuel Oshry, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

John Charles Pentzer, B.S., University of Maryland, 1955 Maryland 

Stanford Elliott Picker, B.A., University of California, 1958; M.A., 1959 

California 
Robert Theobald Probst, II, B.S., Iowa State College, 1950; M.S., 1952 

Connecticut 
George Michael Quinlan, Jr., B.A., American International College, 1957 

Massachusetts 

John Robert Rasczewski, Bucknell University Maryland 

Richard Mann Reddish, B.S., University of Maryland, 1960 Maryland 

Martin Stewart Reeber, University of Florida Florida 

Francis Richard Richo, B.A., Providence College, 1959 Connecticut 

Edward Richard Rose, B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1959 Maryland 

Ivan Alan Rosengarden, B.A., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

Paul Rubinstein, University of Maryland Maryland 

Nicolaus Sakiewicz, B.S., Columbia University, 1959 New Jersey 

Robert Alan Samuel, University of Florida Florida 

Fred Maurice Scholnick, B.S., University of Maryland, 1960 Maryland 

Paul Wesley Shaffer, West Virginia University Maryland 

Donald Siegendorf, University of Miami Florida 

Howard Ronald Siegler, University of Miami New York 



50 



School of Dentistry 

Junius Thomas Soliday, Davis and Elkins College West Virginia 

Edward David Spire, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

John Walter Staubach, B.S., Franklin and Marshall College, 1959. . Maryland 

George Cyril Strong, Los Angeles City College California 

Ebcrhard Wolfgang Tinter, Iona College Germany 

Thomas John Toman, University of Maryland Maryland 

Norman Michael Trabulsy, B.S., University of Miami, 1957 Florida 

Henry John Van Hassel, B.A., Maryville College, 1954 New Jersey 

Lorenzo Stephan Vazzana, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

Kenneth Harold Webster, B.S., State College of Washington, 1960. Washington 

Francis William Welch, B.S., Springfield College, 1958 Massachusetts 

Paul Xavier Welch, American International College Massachusetts 

George Carl White, West Virginia University West Virginia 

Joseph Michael Wiesenbaugh, Jr., Mount Saint Mary's College .... Pennsylvania 
Harvey Ray Wildman, B.S., Mount Saint Mary's College, 1959. Connecticut 
Herbert Alan Wolford, D.V.M., Michigan State College, 1952. . . .Pennsylvania 

Sheldon Joel Wollman, Johns Hopkins University Maryland 

Gary Lee Womer, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

Maurice Richard Woodard, B.S., American University, 1952 Maryland 

Donald Russell Yent, University of Maryland Maryland 

Freshman Class 

Charles Bernard Abelson, University of Maryland Maryland 

Fred Norton Ansel, University of Maryland Maryland 

Angelo Angelino Baccala, B.S., University of Maryland, 1953 Maryland 

Paul Vincent Beauvais, B.S., St. Francis College, 1960 Massachusetts 

Lucien Ernest Benoit, Providence College Rhode Island 

Bernard Harry Blaustein, B.S., University of Maryland, 1960 Maryland 

Donald Lee Bloum, B.A., Washington Missionary College, 1956. . . Maryland 

William Langton Brice, University of Maryland Maryland 

Albert Edward Carlotti, Jr., B.S., University of Rhode Island, 1960. Rhode island 

Edgar Harold Chambers, B.S., University of Miami, 1960 Florida 

Martin Leo Chaput, B.A., Merrimack College, 1960 Massachusetts 

Stephen Robert Cognata, University of California California 

William Clise Colwell, Washington State University Washington 

Joseph Louis Corey, A.B., West Virginia University, 1960. . . West Virginia 

Ronald Dalinsky, University of Maryland Maryland 

Charles Edward Doll, Jr., B.S., Saint Bonaventure University, 1960 New York 

Robert Lore Early, B.A., Ohio Wesleyan University, 1960 Maryland 

Edward Robert Emerson, Washington College Maryland 

Barry Elliott Feldman, University of Maryland Maryland 

Richard John Fennelly, Mount Saint Mary's College Pennsylvania 

Burton Morton Finifter, B.A., University of Maryland, 1960 Maryland 

Robert Paul Fogarty, University of Utah Utah 

Clark Neamand Foulke, B.S., University of Maryland, 1957 Maryland 

Lawrence Fox, B.A., University of Maryland, 1960 Maryland 

Francis Leon Fraser, A.B., Carroll College, 1955 Maryland 

51 ► 



University of Maryland 

John Michael Freiler, B.S., Moravian College, 1960 New Jersey 

Richard Anthony Gaudio, A.B., Providence College, 1959 Connecticut 

John Charles Gigliotti, B.S., University of Maryland, 1960. Maryland 

Gary Kenneth Gold, B.S., University of Maryland, 1960 Maryland 

Ira Norman Goldbach, University of Miami Florida 

Rodney Frank Golden, University of Maryland Maryland 

Constantinos Xenophon Govedaros, University of Maryland Maryland 

Edward George Grace, Jr., B.S., Mount Saint Mary's College, 1960 New York 

Marian Carter Greear, Jr., University of Florida Florida 

Stephen Michael Grussmark, University of Florida Florida 

Dennis Wright Guard, University of Maryland Maryland 

Thomas Kenneth, Guglielmo, Jr., B.S., Mount Saint Mary's College, 1960 

New Jersey 
John Patrick Hackett, Bucknell University New Jersey 

Paul Ronald Hall, B.S., University of Maryland, 1960 . Maryland 

Joseph Gold Handelman, B.S., University of Maryland, 1960 Maryland 

Alan Howard Hart, University of Maryland Maryland 

Frederick Guy Herrick, B.S., Bates College, 1960 New Jersey 

Jeffrey Alan Herrman, University of Miami Florida 

Robert William Hilkene, Fairleigh Dickinson University New Jersey 

Lawrence Edwards Himelfarb, B.A., University of Pennsylvania, 1960. Maryland 

Joseph Hinich, Jr., Utah State University Utah 

Maxwell Patrick Hogan, Niagara University New York 

Charles Edward Hunt, B.A., Western Maryland College, 1958 Maryland 

John Roedel Jaeger, Jr., B.S., Dickinson College, 1960 Maryland 

Ron James Jonas, Washington State University Washington 

John Joseph Jordan, B.S., University of Scranton, 1957 Pennsylvania 

Clifford Harold Jue, University of California California 

Richard Bennett Kirk, B.S., Baldwin-Wallace College, 1959 New Jersey 

Albert Hiram Klair, Jr., Washington College Maryland 

Neil Woodrow Lamb, B.S., University of Maryland, 1960 Maryland 

Jeffrey Allen Legum, B.A., University of Maryland, 1960 Maryland 

Harold Bernard Levine, University of Miami Florida 

Malcolm Lawrence Mclnnis, Providence College Massachusetts 

Donald Lee Maloof, University of Maryland Maryland 

Franklin Eugene May, B.S., Loyola College, 1956 Maryland 

Ian Bertram Miller, University of Maryland Maryland 

Walter Merrill Miller, B.A., University of Maryland, 1960 Maryland 

David Lawrence Mincey, A.B., University of North Carolina, 1960 

North Carolina 

Richard Stephen Nemes, Montgomery Junior College Maryland 

Robert Preston Nitzell, The Johns Hopkins University Maryland 

Wayne Lance O'Roark, B.S., University of Maryland, 1960 Maryland 

Albert Louis Ousborne, Jr., University of Maryland Maryland 

Robert Pete Padousis, University of Maryland Maryland 

Joseph O. Pampalone, B.A., Hunter College, 1960 New York 

Charles Bernard Parr, Jr., Loyola College Maryland 

John Fairfax Patterson, B.S., University of Maryland, 1960 Maryland 



52 






School of Dentistry 

Lance David Petersen, Montgomery Junior College Maryland 

Stanley Martin Plies, University of Maryland Maryland 

Ernest Alfred Ponce, San Bernardino Valley College California 

Norman Henry Proulx, B.A., Saint Anselm's College, 1960. . . .New Hampshire 

Philip Howard Pushkin, B.A., University of Maryland, 1960 Maryland 

Irving Jacob Raksin, B.S., University of Maryland, 1960 Maryland 

Albert Richard Raye, B.S., Washington College, 1960 Maryland 

Norman Robert Ressin, University of Maryland Maryland 

Charles Milton Rosenberg, B.A., Emory University, 1960 Georgia 

John Nicholas Russo, Jr., B.S., Mount Saint Mary's College, 1960. . . .Delaware 

John Winthrop Sargent, B.S., University of Florida, 1960 New Jersey 

John Reno Savoia, B.S., Springfield College, 1960 Massachusetts 

James Lawrence Schatz, B.S., Loyola College, 1960 Maryland 

Thomas Anthony Simes, B.S., University of Cincinnati, 1957 Ohio 

Harvey Frank Simon, University of Maryland Maryland 

Douglas Graham Spink, Jr., B.A., Seton Hall University, 1960. Massachusetts 

V'ictor Elliott Spiro, A.B., Boston University, 1959 Massachusetts 

Albert Haywood Swain, B.S., University of Maryland, 1960 New Jersey 

Herbert Barry Taragin, University of Maryland Maryland 

Jerome Bernard Taragin, Georgetown University District of Columbia 

Clinton Dee Taylor, University of Utah Utah 

Mervin Armel Todd, A.B., Duke University, 1960 New Jersey 

Charles Edward Toomey, III B.S., Washington and Lee University, 1959 

Maryland 

Warren Kenneth Veith, B.A., Ohio State University, 1960 New Jersey 

Thomas Francis Walsh, B.S., Mount Saint Mary's College, 1960. . . New York 

Ronald Stanley Wershba, B.S., Long Island University, 1960 New York 

David L. White, Jr., A.B., University of California, 1960 California 

Theodore Toms Wycall, B.S., Florida Southern College, 1960 New Jersey 

John Paroy Youngman, Saint Petersburg Junior College Florida 



53 



University of Maryland 

DEANS OF DENTAL SCHOOLS IN BALTIMORE 

BALTIMORE COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 

(Founded 1840) 

Chapin A. Harris 1840-1841 

Thomas E. Bond 1841-1842 

Washington R. Handy 1842-1853 

Philip H. Austen 1853-1865 

Ferdinand J. S. Gorgas 1865-1882 

Richard B. Winder 1882-1894 

M. Whilldin Foster 1894-1914 

William G. Foster 1914-1923 

MARYLAND DENTAL COLLEGE 

1873-1878 (Merged with B. C. D. S.) 

Richard B. Winder 1873-1878 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

(Founded 1882) 

Ferdinand J. S. Gorgas 1882-191 1 

Timothy O. Heatwole 191 1 — 1923 

BALTIMORE MEDICAL COLLEGE 

1895-1913 (Merged with U. of Md.) 

J. William Smith 1895-1901 

William A. Montell 1901-1903 

J. Edgar Orrison 1903-1904 

J. William Smith 1904-1913 

BALTIMORE COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 

DENTAL SCHOOL 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

(B. C. D. S. Joined the U. of Md. 1923) 

Timothy O. Heatwole 1923-1924 

J. Ben Robinson 1924-1953 

Myron S. Aisenberg (Acting) 1953 

Myron S. Aisenberg 1954— present 



54 






University of Maryland 



INDEX 



Academic Calendar 2 

Admission Requirements 12 

Admission with Advanced 

Standing 15 

Alumni Association 39-40 

Anatomy 25 

Application Procedures 14 

Arts and Sciences- 
Dental Program 12-14 

Attendance Requirements 15 

Baltimore Union 21-22 

Biochemistry 25-26 

Board of Regents 1 

Cafeteria 21 

Curriculum, Plan of 23-24 

Deans of the Baltimore 

Dental Schools 54 

Definition of Residence and 

Non-Residence 19 

Dental History and Literature 26 

Dental Prosthesis 

Removable Complete and 

Partial Prosthesis 26-27 

Fixed Partial Prosthesis 27-28 

Deportment 16 

Description of Courses 25-38 

Diagnosis 28 

Dormitory Accommodations 21-22 

Equipment Requirements 16 

Faculty Listing 3-9 

Fees, Graduate 18 

Fees, Student 17 

Freshman Class 51-53 

Gorgas Odontological Society . 38 
Graduating Class (1959-60) 

Session 43-45 

Graduation Requirements 16-17 



Histology 

History of the School 

Index 

Junior Class 

Library 



Matriculation and Enrollment 
Medicine 

General Medicine 

Oral Medicine 

Microbiology 

Officers of Administration 

Officers of Instruction 

Omicron Kappa Upsilon 

Operative Dentistry 

Orthodontics 

Pathology 

Pedodontics 

Pharmacology 

Physiology 

Postgraduate Courses 
Practice Administration 

Promotion and Grading 

Refunds 

Registration 

Requirements for Admission 
Requirements for Graduation . 
Requirements for Matriculation 

and Enrollment 

Roentgenology 

Scholarship and Loan Funds 

Senior Class 

Senior Prize Awards 

Sophomore Class 

Summer Courses 

Student Health Service 

Surgery 

Visual Aids 



29 
10-11 

55 
47-49 

11 

14 

29-30 
30-31 

31 
3 

3-9 
38-39 

32 
32-33 

33 
33-34 
34-35 

35 

18 
35-36 
15-16 

18 
18-19 

12 
16-17 

14 
36 
20-21 
45-47 
41-42 
49-51 
38 
19-20 
36-37 
37-38 



55 



* -*c-i ; - 



THE 



UNIVERSITY of MARYLAND 



School of Dentistry 



m 




1962-1963 



The provisions of this 'publication are not to he regarded 
as an irrevocable contract between the student and the 
University of Maryland. The University reserves the 
right to change any provision or requirement at any time 
within the student's term of residence. The University 
further reserves the right at any time, to ask a student 
to withdraw when it considers such action to be in the 
best interests of the University. 



ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-SECOND CATALOGUE 

with 

Announcements For 

The 1962-1963 Session 




BALTIMORE COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 
DENTAL SCHOOL 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 



THE PROVISIONS of this publication are not to be regarded as an irrevocable con- 
tract between the student and the University of Maryland. The University reserves 
the right to change any provision or requirement at any time within the student's 
term of residence. The University further reserves the right at any time, to ask a 
student to withdraw when it considers such action to be in the best interests of the 
University. 






BOARD OF REGENTS 

and 
MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE 

Charles P. McCormick 

Chairman 1966 

McCormick and Company, 414 Light Street, Baltimore 2 

Edward F. Holter 

Vice-ChaiTman 1968 

Farmers Home Administration, U. S. D. A., Appraisers Stores' 
Building, 103 South Gay Street, Baltimore, Maryland 

B. Herbert Brown 

Secretary 1967 

The Baltimore Institute, 10 West Chase Street, Baltimore 1 

Harry H. Nuttle 

Treasurer 1966 

Denton 

Louis L. Kaplan 

Assistant Secretary 1964 

5800 Park Heights Avenue, Baltimore 15 

C. Ewing Tuttle 

Assistant Treasurer 1962 

907 Latrobe Building Charles and Read Streets, Baltimore 2 

Richard W. Case 1967 

Cmmercial Credit Building, Baltimore 

Thomas W. Pangborn 1965 

The Pangborn Corporation, Pangborn Blvd., Hagerstown 

Thomas B. Symons 1963 

Suburban Trust Company, 6950 Carroll Avenue, Takoma Park 

Willlam C. Walsh 1963 

Liberty Trust Building, Cumberland 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst 1967 

4101 Greenway, Baltimore 18 



Members of the Board are appointed by the Governor of the State for terms of 
seven years each, beginning the first Monday in June. Members may serve only two 
consecutive terms. 

The President of the University of Maryland is, by law, Executive Officer of the 
Board. 

The State law provides that the Board of Regents of the University of Maryland 
shall constitute the Maryland State Board of Agriculture. 



University of Maryland 

ACADEMIC CALENDAR 
1962-1963 Session 

First Semester 

1962 

September 17 Monday Orientation Program for Freshman Class 

September 18 Tuesday Registration for Freshman Class 

September 19 Wednesday Registration for Sophomore Class 

September 20 Thursday Registration for Junior and Senior Classes 

September 21 Friday Instruction begins with first scheduled 

period 
November 20 Tuesday Thanksgiving recess begins at close of last 

scheduled period 

November 26 Monday Instruction resumes with first scheduled 

period 
December 19 Wednesday __ Christmas recess begins at close of last 

scheduled period 

1963 

January 2 Wednesday Instruction resumes with first scheduled 

period 

January 28 Monday, 

and 29 Tuesday Second Semester Registration 

February 1 Friday First Semester ends at the close of last 

scheduled period 

Second Semester 

February 4 Monday Instruction begins with first scheduled 

period 

February 22 Friday Washington's Birthday — Holiday 

April 11 Thursday Easter recess begins at close of last sched- 
uled period 

April 16 Tuesday Instruction resumes with first scheduled 

period 

May 30 Thursday Memorial Day — Holiday 

June 6 Thursday Second Semester ends at close of last sched- 
uled period 

June 8 Saturday Commencement 

2 



School of Dentistry 
OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

wilson homer elkins, President of the University 

B.A., M.A., B.LITT., D.PHIL. 

MYRON S. AISENBERG, Dean 
D.D.S. 

c. watson algire, Director of Admissions and Registration 

B.A., M.S. 

james p. hill, Registrar 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 
1961-1962 SESSION 

Emeritus 

j. ben robinson, Dean Emeritus 

D.D.S., D.SC. 

Professors 

myron s. aisenberg, Professor of Pathology 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1922. 

Joseph calton BDDDix, jr., Professor of Oral Diagnosis 
d.d.s. , University of Maryland, 1934. 

edward c. dobbs, Professor of Pharmacology and Therapeutics 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1929; B.s., 1952. 

brice marden dorsey, Professor of Oral Surgery 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1927. 

Gardner Patrick henry foley, Professor of Dental Literature 
b.a., Clark University, 1923; m.a., 1926. 

Grayson wilbur caver, Professor of Dental Prosthesis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1922. 

William edward hahn, Professor of Anatomy 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1931; a.b., University of Rochester, 1958; M.S., 1939. 

jose e. Medina, Professor of Operative Dentistry 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1948. 

ernest b. nuttall, Professor of Fixed Partial Prosthesis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1931. 

kyrle w. preis, Professor of Orthodontics 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1929. 



University of Maryland 

D. Vincent provenza, Professor of Histology and Embryology 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1939; M.S., 1941; ph.d., 1952. 

wilbur owen Ramsey, Professor of Dental Prosthesis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1943. 

donald e. shay, Professor of Microbiology 
b.s., Lebanon Valley College, 1937; M.S., University of Maryland, 1938; PH.D., 1943. 

e. g. vanden bosche, Professor of Biochemistry 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1922; M.S., University of Maryland, 1924; PH.D., 1927. 

john irving white, Professor of Physiology 

b.a., University of Illinois, 1939; PH.D., Rutgers University, 1950. 



Associate Professors 

irving I. abramson, Associate Professor of Oral Medicine 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1932. 

Joseph Patrick cappuccio, Associate Professor of Oral Surgery 
b.s., University of Rhode Island, 1943; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1946. 

Stanley h. dosh, Associate Professor of Fixed Partial Prosthesis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1935. 

alvin f. Gardner, Associate Professor of Pathology 
a.a., University of Florida, 1940; d.d.s., Emory University, 1943; M.S., University of Il- 
linois, 1957; ph.d., Georgetown University, 1959. 

calvin Joseph gaver, Associate Professor of Operative Dentistry 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1950; d.d.s., 1954. 

yam-hin louie, Associate Professor of Operative Dentistry 
b.s., Lingnan University, Canton, China, 1938; d.d.s., Northwestern University, 1945; 
m.s.d., 1946. 

george mc lean, Associate Professor of Physical Diagnosis and Principles of Medicine 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1916. 

peter mc lean-lu, Associate Professor of Fixed Partial Prosthesis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1934. 

Walter L. oggesen, Associate Professor of Fixed Partial Prosthesis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1926. 

george w. piavis, Associate Professor of Anatomy 

a.b., Western Maryland College, 1948; m.ed., 1952; ph.d., Duke University, 1958. 

burton Robert pollack, Associate Professor of Physiology 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1946. 

douglas john Sanders, Associate Professor of Pedodontics 
b.s., Northwestern University, 1946; d.d.s., 1948. 

E. Roderick shipley, Associate Professor of Physiology 

A.B., The Johns Hopkins University, 1938; M.D., University of Maryland, 1942. 

4 



School of Dentistry 

L. edward warner, Associate Professor of Dental Prosthesis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1931. 

Assistant Professors 

alvin david aisenberg, Assistant Professor of Pathology 
d.d.s,, University of Maryland, 1945. 

samuel hollinger bryant, Assistant Professor of Oral Diagnosis 

a.b., Western Maryland College, 1928; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1932. 

huch m. clement, jr., Assistant Professor of Operative Dentistry 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1944. 

jerome s. cullen, Assistant Professor of Orthodontics 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1941. 

jose h. diaz, Assistant Professor of Operative Dentistry 

b.s., University of Puerto Rico, 1941; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1950. 

frank a. dolle, Assistant Professor of Pharmacology and Therapeutics 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1948; M.S., 1950; PH.D., 1954; d.d.s., 1959 

fred ehrlich, Assistant Professor of Pedodontics 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1947. 

Marvin M. graham, Assistant Professor of Fixed Partial Prosthesis 

a.b., Cornell University, 1938; a.m., 1939; d.d.s., University of Pennsylvania, 1943. 

conrad l. inman, Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology 
d.d.s., Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, 1915. 

william kress, Assistant Professor of Orthodontics 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1936 

james p. norris, Assistant Professor of Oral Medicine 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1950; d.d.s., 1956. 

Norton morris ross, Assistant Professor of Pharmacology 

B.s., University of Connecticut, 1949; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1954. 

daniel edward shehan, Assistant Professor of Orthodontics 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1922. 

frank j. sinnreich, jr., Assistant Professor of Anatomy 
B.s., University of Maryland, 1951; d.d.s., 1961. 

Arthur g. siwinski, Assistant Professor of Oral Surgery. 

A.B., The Johns Hopkins University, 1927; M.D., University of Maryland, 1931. 

D. Robert sv.tnehart, Assistant Professor of Orthodontics 

a.b., Dartmouth College, 1933; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1937. 

edmond g. vanden bosche, Assistant Professor of Tooth Morphology 

b.s., The Pennsylvania State University, 1943; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1947. 

david H. willer, Assistant Professor of Full Denture Prosthesis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1933. 



University of Maryland 

Special Lecturers 

c. richard fravel, Lecturer in Principles of Medicine 
m.d., University of Maryland, 1949. 

martin helrich, Professor of Anesthesiology {School of Medicine) 
b.s., Dickinson College, 1946; M.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1946. 

richard lindenberg, Lecturer in Neuroanatomy 
m.d., University of Berlin, 1944. 

ethelbert lovett, Lecturer in Ethics 

d.d.s., Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, 1922. 

william j. o'donnell, Lecturer in Jurisprudence 

A.B., Loyola College, 1937; ll.b., University of Maryland, 1941. 

harry m. robinson, jr., Professor of Dermatology (School of Medicine) 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1931; m.d., 1935. 

George herschel yeager, Professor of Clinical Surgery (School of Medicine) 
B.s., West Virginia University, 1927; m.d., University of Maryland, 1929. 

Instructors 

sterrett p. beaven, Instructor in Operative Dentistry 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1941. 

earl f. becker, Instructor in Microbiology 

b.s., Muhlenberg College, 1951; M.S., George Washington University, 1957. 

henry j. bianco, Instructor in Operative Dentistry 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1956. 

jerome d. buxbaum, Instructor in Physiology 
b.s.c, University of Maryland, 1951; d.d.s., 1955. 

gene E. camp, Instructor in Oral Surgery 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1960. 

thomas F. clement, Instructor in Oral Medicine 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1951. 

james R. crouse, Instructor in Operative Dentistry 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1961. 

Charles a. darby, Instructor in Roentgenology 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1960. 

paul a. deems, Instructor in Orthodontics 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1928. 

Conrad c. ferlita, Instructor in Pedodontics 
B.s., University of Miami, 1956; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1959 

JOHN M. foley, Instructor in Histology and Embryology 
B.s., Loyola College, 1955; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1959. 

Joseph j. giardina, Instructor in Pedodontics 

b.s., University of Maryland, 1957; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1960 



School of Dentistry 

john G. coettee, jr., Instructor in Fixed Partial Prosthesis 

b.s., Western Maryland College, 1957; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1961. 

ralph jack cordon, Instructor in Dental Prosthesis 
d.d.s. , University of Maryland, 1933. 

Walter granruth, JR., Instructor in Pathology 

B.s., Loyola College, 1950; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1954. 

david w. heese, Instructor in Operative Dentistry 

b.a., The Johns Hopkins University, 1953; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1960. 

melvin john jagielski, Instructor in Tooth Morphology 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1953. 

francis j. kihn, Instructor in Pedodontics 

B.s., Loyola College, 1952; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1956. 

anthony J. klein, Instructor in Roentgenology 

B.s., University of Cincinnati, 1954; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1958. 

Michael e kolakowski, Instructor in Oral Medicine 
B.s., University of Maryland, 1957; d.d.s., 1961. 

lester lebo, Instructor in Oral Diagnosis 
B.s., University of Chicago, 1938; m.d., 1941. 

Charles brown Leonard, jr., Instructor in Biochemistry 
b.a., Rutgers College of South Jersey, 1955; M.S., University of Maryland, 1957. 

richard r. c Leonard, Instructor in Public Health Dentistry 

d.d.s., Indiana University, 1922; m.s.p.h., University of Michigan, 1944. 

Charles E loveman, Instructor in Anatomy 

a.b., The Johns Hopkins University, 1935; d.d.s., Columbia University, 1939. 

martin H. morris, Instructor in Biochemistry 
b.s., Rutgers University, 1952; M.S., 1954. 

frank n. ogden, Instructor in First Aid and in Charge of Medical Care of Students 
m.d., University of Maryland, 1917. 

james e. palmer, Instructor in Oral Diagnosis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1961. 

Chester j. Richmond, Instructor in Oral Surgery 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1959. 

myron HiLLARD sachs, Instructor in Anatomy 
d.d.s., Columbia University, 1939. 

Joseph h. seipp, Instructor in Histology and Embryology 

a.b., Loyola College, 1951; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1955; M.S., University of 
Pittsburgh, 1957. 

philip smith, Instructor in Oral Diagnosis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1959. 

leah M. p. staling, Instructor in Physiology 
bs., University of Maryland, 1944; M.S., 1948. 






University of Maryland 

clenn D. Steele, Instructor in Fixed Partial Prosthesis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1942. 

Claude p. taylor, Director of Visual Education 

Francis a. veltre, Instructor in Operative Dentistry 
R.s., University of Maryland, 1952; M.S., 1954; d.d.s., 1959. 

earle Harris watson, Instructor in Dental Materials and Dental Prosthesis 
ab., University of North Carolina, 1938; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1942. 

nelson a. wright, Instructor in Full Denture Prosthesis 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1955. 

georce d. yent, jr., Instructor in Full Denture Prosthesis 
d.d.s.. University of Maryland, 1956. 

Library Staff 

ida marian robinson, Librarian and Associate Professor of Library Science 

a.b., Cornell University, 1924; b.s.l.s., Columbia University School of Library 
Service, 1944. 

hilda e. moore, Associate Librarian and Assistant Professor of Library Science 
a.b., Randolph-Macon Women's College, 1936; a.b.l.s., Emory University Library 
School, 1937. 

sarah l. atkins, Cataloging Assistant 

marie m. chaffman, Assistant Circulation Librarian 

Jacqueline b. clem, Secretary to the Librarian 

edith M. coyle, Head, Serials Department 

a.b., University of North Carolina, 1937; a.b.l.s., University of North Carolina School 
of Library Science, 1939; m.a., The Johns Hopkins University, 1945. 

ruth e. hanna, Assistant Acquisitions Librarian 

a.b., Hanover College, 1939; m.s.l.s., Catholic University of America, 1961. 

Lorraine hlavin, Serials Assistant 

simone c. hurst, Head, Circulation Department 

Florence r. kirk, Reference Librarian 

hans-guenther r. listfeldt, Assistant Serials Librarian 

B.s., Loyola College, 1956; m.s.l.s., Catholic University of America, 1961. 

Beatrice Marriott, Reference Librarian 
A.B., University of Maryland, 1944. 

eleanor m. mitten, Head, Catalog Department 

B.s., Cornell University, 1942; b.s.l.s., Syracuse University, 1949 

Kathleen scheller, Cataloging Assistant 

elwood sterling, Library Clerk 

marjorie f. vilk, Cataloger 

B.s., Kutztown State Teachers College, 1952. 

katherine m. wheatley, Serials Assistant 

8 



The School of 
Dentistry 



History 

THE BALTIMORE COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY OCCUPIES 
an important and interesting place in the history of dentistry. At the 
end of the regular session — 1961-62 — it completed its one hundred and 
twenty-second year of service to dental education. The Baltimore College of 
Dental Surgery represents the first effort in history to offer institutional dental 
education to those anticipating the practice of dentistry. 

The first lectures on dentistry in America were delivered by Dr. Horace 
H. Hayden in the University of Maryland, School of Medicine, between the 
years 1823-25. These lectures were interrupted in 1825 by internal dissensions 
in the School of Medicine and were as a consequence discontinued. It was 
Dr. Hayden's idea that dental education merited greater attention than had 
been given it by medicine or could be given it by the preceptorial plan of 
dental teaching then in vogue. 



University of Maryland 

Dr. Horace H. Hayden began the practice of dentistry in Baltimore 
in 1800. From that time he made a zealous attempt to lay the foundation 
for a scientific, serviceable dental profession. In 1831 Dr. Chapin A. Harris 
came to Baltimore to study under Hayden. Dr. Harris was a man of unusual 
ability and possessed special qualifications to aid in establishing and pro- 
moting formal dental education. Since Dr. Hayden's lectures had been 
interrupted at the University of Maryland and there was an apparent unsur- 
mountable difficulty confronting the creation of dental departments in 
medical schools, an independent college was decided upon. A charter was 
applied for and granted by the Maryland Legislature February 1, 1840. The 
first Faculty meeting was held February 3, 1840, at which time Dr. Horace 
H. Hayden was elected President and Dr. Chapin A. Harris, Dean. The 
introductory lecture was delivered by Dr. Hayden on November 3, 1840, to 
the five students matriculating in the first class. Thus was created as the 
foundation of the present dental profession the Baltimore College of Dental 
Surgery, the first dental school in the world. 

Hayden and Harris, the admitted founders of conventional dental 
education, contributed, in addition to the factor of dental education, other 
opportunities for professional growth and development. In 1839 the Ameri- 
can Journal of Dental Science was founded, with Chapin A. Harris as its 
editor. Dr. Harris continued fully responsible for dentistry's initial venture 
into periodic dental literature to the time of his death. The files of the old 
American Journal of Dental Science testify to the fine contributions made by 
Dr. Harris. In 1840 the American Society of Dental Surgeons was founded, 
with Dr. Horace H. Hayden as its President and Dr. Chapin A. Harris as 
its Corresponding Secretary. This was the beginning of dental organization 
in America, and was the forerunner of the American Dental Association, 
which now numbers approximately ninety-three thousand in its present 
membership. The foregoing suggests the unusual influence Baltimore dentists 
and the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery have exercised on professional 
ideals and policies. 

In 1873, the Maryland Dental College, an offspring of the Baltimore 
College of Dental Surgery, was organized. It continued instruction until 
1878, at which time it was consolidated with the Baltimore College of Dental 
Surgery. A department of dentistry was organized at the University of 
Maryland in the year 1882, graduating a class each year from 1883 to 1923. 
This school was chartered as a corporation and continued as a privately 
owned and directed institution until 1920, when it became a State institution. 
The Dental Department of the Baltimore Medical College was established in 
1895, continuing until 1913, when it merged with the Dental Department of 
the University of Maryland. 

The final combining of the dental educational interests of Baltimore was 
effected June 15, 1923, by the amalgamation of the student bodies of the 
Baltimore College of Dental Surgery and the University of Maryland, School 
of Dentistry; the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery becoming a distinct 

10 



School of Dentistry 

department of the University under State supervision and control. Thus we 
find in the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, University 
of Maryland, a merging of the various efforts at dental education in Mary- 
land. From these component elements have radiated developments of the 
art and science of dentistry until the strength of its alumni is second to none, 
in either number or degree of service to the profession. 

Library 

This School is fortunate in having one of the better equipped and 
organized libraries among the dental schools of the country. The dental 
collection is part of the Health Sciences Library, which includes also phar- 
macy, medicine and nursing, with about 90,000 bound volumes and over 
1600 current subscriptions to scientific periodicals. A new air-conditioned, 
four-story library building at 111 South Greene, across the street from the 
Dental School, provides ample space for books and readers. A well-qualified 
staff of professionally trained and certified librarians promotes the services 
of the library and assists the student body in the use of library resources. 
One of the most important factors of the dental student's education is to 
teach him the value and the use of dental literature in his formal education 
and in promoting his usefulness and value to the profession during practice. 
The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery is ideally equipped to achieve 
this aim of dental instruction. 

Course of Instruction 

The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, University of 
Maryland offers a course in dentistry devoted to instruction in the medical 
sciences, the dental sciences, and clinical practice. Instruction consists of di- 
dactic lectures, laboratory instruction, demonstrations, conferences, quizzes 
and hospital ward rounds. Topics are assigned for collateral reading to train 
the student in the value and use of dental literature. The curriculum for the 
complete course appears on pages 23 and 24 of this catalogue. 

Requirements for Admission 

Applicants for admission must present evidence of having completed suc- 
cessfully two academic years of work in an accredited college of arts and 
sciences based upon the completion of a four-year high school course or the 
equivalent in entrance examinations. The college course must include at 
least a year's credit in English, in biology, in physics, in inorganic chemistry, 
and in organic chemistry. All required science courses shall include both 
classroom and laboratory instruction. Although a minimum of 60 semester 
hours of credit, exclusive of physical education and military science, is 
required, additional courses in the humanities and the natural and social 
sciences are desirable. By ruling of the Dean's Council, all admission re- 
quirements must be completed by June 30 previous to the desired date of 
admission. 

11 



University of Maryland 

In considering candidates for admission, the Board of Admissions will 
give preference to those applicants who have high scholastic records in sec- 
ondary school and in college; who make satisfactory scores in the dental 
aptitude test; who present favorable recommendations from their respective 
predental committee or from one instructor in each of the departments of 
biology, chemistry, and physics; and who, in all other respects, give every 
promise of becoming successful students and dentists of high standing. 
Applicants will not be admitted with unabsolved conditions or unabsolved 
failures. 

Combined Arts and Sciences-Dental Program 

The University offers a combined arts and sciences-dental curriculum 
leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Science and Doctor of Dental Surgery. 
The preprofessional part of this curriculum shall be taken in residence in 
the College of Arts and Sciences at College Park, and the professional part in 
the School of Dentistry in Baltimore. 

Students who elect the combined program and who have completed the 
arts and sciences phase of it may, upon the recommendation of the Dean of 
the School of Dentistry, be granted the degree of Bachelor of Science by the 
College of Arts and Sciences at the first summer commencement following 
the completion of the student's first year in the School of Dentistry. A stu- 
dent may enter the arts and sciences-dental program at College Park with 
advanced standing from an accredited college or university, but the last 
year of the preprofessional training must be completed at College Park and 
the professional training must be completed in the School of Dentistry of the 
University of Maryland. 



12 



School of Dentistry 



ARTS-DENTISTRY CURRICULUM 

, — Semester—^ 

Freshman Year I II 

Eng. 1, 2 — Composition and American Literature 3 3 

Zool. 1 — General Zoology 4 

Zool. 2— The Animal Phyla — 4 

Chem. 1, 3 — General Chemistry 4 4 

Math. 10, 11 — Algebra, Trigonometry, Analytic Geometry 3 3 

Speech 7 — 2 

Physical Activities 1 1 

A. S. 1, 2— Basic Air Force ROTC (Men) % 2 

Hea. 2, 4— Hygiene (Women) 2 2 

Total 15y 2 19 

Sophomore Year 

Eng. 3, 4 or 5, 6 — Composition and World or English 

Literature 3 3 

*Group I Elective 3 

G. & P. 1 — American Government 3 

Chem. 35, 36, 37, 38— Organic Chemistry 4 4 

**H. 5, 6 — History of American Civilization 3 3 

***Modern Language 3 3 

Physical Activities 1 1 

A. S. 3, 4— Basic Air Force ROTC (Men) 2 % 

Total 17-19 17-17^ 

Junior Year 

Modern Language (continued) 3 3 

Phys. 10, 11— Fundamentals of Physics 4 4 

Approved Minor Courses 6 6 

Electives 3 3 

Total 16 16 

Senior Year 

The curriculum of the first year of the School of Dentistry of the 
University of Maryland is accepted by the College of Arts and Sciences as 
the fourth year (major sequence) of academic work toward the degree of 
Bachelor of Science. 



*Group 1 Electives: Sociology 1, Philosophy 1, Psychology 1, Economics 37. 
** Students planning to request admission to a Dental School with only two years 
of predental training should take Physics 10-11. 
***Fr. 6, 7 or Ger. 6, 7 (Intermediate Scientific French or German) recommended. 



13 



University of Maryland 

If at the end of the junior year the student decides to postpone his 
entrance to the School of Dentistry and to remain in the College of Arts and 
Sciences and complete work for the Bachelor's degree, he may choose a 
major and minor in any of the departments in which he has completed the 
necessary underclass requirements. The general nature of the first three 
years of this curriculum and the generous electives of the third year make 
possible for the student a wide choice of departments in which he may 
specialize. In general the electives of the third year will be chosen as for a 
major in some particular department. 

Requirements for Matriculation and Enrollment 

In the selection of students to begin the study of dentistry the School 
considers particularly a candidate's proved ability in secondary education 
and his successful completion of prescribed courses in predental collegiate 
training. The requirements for admission and the academic regulations of 
the College of Arts and Sciences, University of Maryland, are strictly adhered 
to by the School of Dentistry. 

A student is not regarded as having matriculated in the School of 
Dentistry until such time as he shall have paid the matriculation fee of $10.00, 
and is not enrolled until he shall have paid a deposit of $200.00. This 
deposit is intended to insure registration in the class and is not returnable. 

Application Procedures 

Candidates seeking admission to the Dental School should write to the 
Office of the Dean requesting an application form. Each applicant should fill 
out the blank in its entirety and mail it promptly, together with the applica- 
tion fee and photographs, to the Board of Admissions, Dental School, Uni- 
versity of Maryland, Baltimore 1, Maryland. The Board of Admissions will 
acknowledge promptly the receipt of the application. If this acknowledgment 
is not received within ten days, the applicant should contact the Board im- 
mediately. The early filing of an application is urged. Applications may be 
filed after June 1 of the year previous to the desired date of admission and 
during the next nine months (to March 1). Applicants wishing advice on 
any problem relating to their predental training or their application should 
communicate with the Board of Admissions. 

All applicants will be required to take the Dental Aptitude Test. This 
test will be given at various testing centers throughout the United States, its 
possessions and Canada. Applicants will be notified by the Council on 
Dental Education of the American Dental Association of the dates of the 
tests and the locations of the testing centers. 

Promising candidates will be required to appear before the Board of 
Admissions for an interview. On the basis of all available information the 
best possible applicants will be chosen for admission to the School. 

14 



School of Dentistry 

A certificate of entrance will be issued to each successful applicant, 
which will permit him to matriculate and to register in the class to which 
he has applied. 

Admission with Advanced Standing 

(a) Graduates in medicine or students in medicine who have completed 
two or more years in a medical school, acceptable to standards in the School 
of Medicine, University of Maryland, may be given advanced standing to 
the Sophomore year provided the applicant shall complete under competent 
regular instruction the courses in dental technology regularly scheduled in 
the first year. 

(b) Applicants for transfer must (1) meet fully the requirements for 
admission to the first year of the dental course; (2) be eligible for promo- 
tion to the next higher class in the school from which he seeks to transfer; 

(3) have no grades below C in the school where transfer credits were earned; 

(4) show evidence of scholastic attainments, character and personality; 

(5) present letters of honorable dismissal and recommendation from the 
dean of the school from which he transfers. 

(c) All applicants for transfer must present themselves in person for 
an interview before qualifying certificate can be issued. 

Attendance Requirements 

In order to receive credit for a full session, each student must have 
entered and be in attendance on the day the regular session opens, at which 
time lectures to all classes begin, and remain until the close of the session, the 
dates for which are announced in the calendar of the annual catalogue. 

Regular attendance is demanded. A student whose attendance in any 
course is unsatisfactory to the head of the department will be denied the 
privilege of final examination in any and all such courses. A student with 
less than 85 per cent attendance will not be promoted to the next succeeding 
year. However, in certain unavoidable circumstances of absences, the Dean 
and the Council may honor excuses exceeding the maximum permitted. 

Grading and Promotion 

The following symbols are used as marks for final grades: A (100-91), 
B (90-84), C (83-77), and D (76-70), Passing; F (below 70), Failure; I, 
Incomplete. Progress grades in courses are indicated as "Satisfactory" and 
"Unsatisfactory." 

A Failure in any subject may be removed only by repeating the subject 
in full. Students who have done work of acceptable quality in their com- 
pleted assignments but who, because of circumstances beyond their control, 
have been unable to finish all asignments, will be given an Incomplete. A 
student shall not carry an Incomplete into the next succeeding year. When 
he has completed the requirements for the removal of an Incomplete, the 
student shall be given the actual grade earned in the course. 

15 



University of Maryland 

Scholastic averages are computed on the basis of semester credits 
assigned to each course and numerical values for grades. The numerical 
values are A-4; B-3; C-2; D-l; F-0. The grade point average is the sum 
of the products of semester credits and grade values, divided by the total 
number of semester credits. 

Students who fail to meet the minimum grade point averages required 
for promotion and who fall into the following categories will be allowed 
probationary promotion: 

1. Freshmen who attain a grade point average of 1.25-1.49. 

2. Sophomores who attain an overall grade point average of 1.6-1.74. 

3. Juniors who attain an overall grade point average of 1.85-1.99. 

Probationary status will not be permitted for two successive years. 

A student may absolve a total of eight credit hours of failure in an 
accredited summer school provided he has the grade point average required 
for promotion or graduation, excluding the failure or failures which he has 
incurred. 

Equipment 

A complete list of necessary instruments and materials for technic and 
clinic courses is presented by the Dental School. Arrangements are made 
by the Dental School in advance of formal enrollment for books, instruments 
and materials to be delivered to the students at the opening of school. Each 
student is required to provide himself promptly with these prescribed neces- 
sities. A student who does not meet this requirement will not be permitted 
to continue with his class. 

Deportment 

The profession of dentistry demands, and the School of Dentistry 
requires, of its students evidence of their good moral character. The conduct 
of the student in relation to his work and fellow students will indicate his 
fitness to be taken into the confidence of the community as a professional 
man. Integrity, sobriety, temperate habits, truthfulness, respect for authority 
and associates and honesty in the transaction of business affairs as a student 
will be considered as evidence of good moral character necessary to the 
granting of a degree. 

Requirements for Graduation 

The degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery is conferred upon a candidate 
who has met the following conditions: 

1. A candidate must furnish documentary evidence that he has at- 
tained the age of 21 years. 

2. A candidate for graduation shall have attended the full scheduled 
course of four academic years. 

3. He will be required to show a grade point average of 2.0 for the 
full course of study. 

16 



School of Dentistry 

4. He shall have satisfied all technic and clinic requirements of the 
various departments. 

5. He shall have paid all indebtedness to the college prior to the 
beginning of final examinations, and must have adjusted his financial obliga- 
tions in the community satisfactorily to those to whom he may be indebted. 

Student Fees 

Matriculation fee (required of all entering students) $ 10.00 

Tuition (each year) : 

Non-resident student 750.00 

Resident student 400.00 

Student health service (each year) 20.00 

Student Union fee 30.00 

The Student Union fee is payable by all students enrolled in 
the Professional Schools on the Baltimore campus and is used 
to pay interest on and amortize the cost of construction of the 
Union Building. 

Special fee 10.00 

The Special fee is payable by all full-time students enrolled in 
the Professional Schools on the Baltimore campus and is used 
to finance equipment for the Union Building. 

Student Activities fee 12.50 

For the purpose of administering various student activities, 
the Student Senate, after approval by the separate classes and 
the Faculty Council, voted a fee of $12.50 to be paid at the 
time of registration. 
Laboratory breakage deposit: 

Freshman year 10.00 

Sophomore and Junior years 5.00 

In addition to fees itemized in the above schedule, the following assess- 
ments are made by the University: 

Application fee (paid at time of filing formal application for admis- 
sion) 7.50 

Late registration fee 5.00 

(All students are expected to complete their registration, in- 
cluding payment of bills, on the regular registration days.) 
Those who do not complete their registration during the pre- 
scribed days will be charged a fee of $5.00. 

Examinations taken out of class and re-examinations 5.00 

One certified transcript of record is issued free of charge. 

*Each additional copy is issued only upon payment of 1.00 

Summer Session students will pay a $6.00 Student Union Fee but 
will not pay the Special Fee. 



♦When more than one copy is requested at the same time, $1.00 is charged for 
the first copy and fifty cents for each additional copy. 

17 



University of Maryland 

Postgraduate Courses 

Postgraduate courses may be offered to qualified dental graduates. 
These courses are designed to provide opportunities for study in special 
fields on a refresher level, and are arranged so that particular emphasis is 
placed on clinical practices. 

Graduate Student Fees 

Matriculation Fee (for new students only, non-returnable) 10.00 

Tuition Fee (per semester credit hour) 15.00 

Laboratory Fees where applicable are charged at the rate 
of $5.00 per semester hour of laboratory credit. 

Student Union Fee 

Students carrying ten or more credit hours per semester (per 

annum) *30.00 

Students carrying less than ten credit hours per semester (per 

annum) *6.00 

Special Fee 

Students carrying ten or more credit hours per semester (per 

annum) *10.00 

Graduation Fee 

Master's Degree 10.00 

Doctor's Degree (including hood and microfilming of thesis). 50.00 

REFUNDS 

According to the policy of the University no fees will be returned. In 
case the student discontinues his course or fails to register after a place has 
been reserved in a class, any fees paid will be credited to a subsequent course, 
but are not transferable. 



Registration 

The registration of a student in any school or college of the University 
shall be regarded as a registration in the University of Maryland, but when 
such student transfers to a professional school of the University or from one 
professional school to another, he must pay the usual matriculation fee re- 
quired by each professional school. 



* Students who initially enroll for the second semester of the school year will be 
assessed at the rate of one half of the rates shown above. 

18 



School of Dentistry- 
Each student is required to fill in a registration card for the office of 
the Registrar, and make payment of one-half of the tuition fee in addition 
to all other fees noted as payable before being admitted to classwork at the 
opening of the session. The remainder of tuition and fees must be in the 
hands of the Comptroller during registration period for the second half of 
the academic year. 

Definition of Residence and Non-Residence 

Students who are minors are considered to be resident students if at 
the time of their registration their parents have been domiciled in this state 
for at least six months. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of 
his first registration in the University, and may not thereafter be changed 
by him unless in the case of a minor, his parents move to and become legal 
residents of Maryland by maintaining such residence for at least six months. 
However, the right of the minor student to change from a non-resident to 
resident status must be established by him prior to the registration period 
set for any semester. 

Adult students are considered to be residents if at the time of their 
registration they have been domiciled in Maryland for at least six months, 
provided such residence has not been acquired while attending any school 
or college in Maryland or elsewhere. Time spent on active duty in the armed 
services while stationed in Maryland will not be considered as satisfying 
the six-months period referred to above except in those cases in which the 
adult was domiciled in Maryland for at least six months prior to his entrance 
into the armed service and was not enrolled in any school during that 
period. 

The word "domicile" as used in this regulation shall mean the permanent 
place of abode. For the purpose of this rule only one domicile may be 
maintained. 

Student Health Service 

The School undertakes to supply medical and surgical care for its 
students through the Student Health Service. This care includes the daily 
services rendered by a physician and a graduate nurse in a well-equipped 
clinic, conveniently located in the Dental School. Also consultations, surgical 
procedures and hospitalization, judged to be necessary by the Service, are 
covered under liberal limitations, depending on length of hospitalization and 
special expenses incurred. 

Students who need medical attention are expected to report at the office 
of the Student Health Service. Under circumstances requiring home treat- 
ment, the students will be visited at their College residence. 

19 



University of Maryland 

It is not within the scope of the Service to provide medical care for 
conditions antedating each annual registration in the University; nor is it 
the function of this Service to treat chronic conditions contracted by students 
before admission or to extend treatment to acute conditions developing in 
the period between academic years or during authorized school vacations. 
The cost of orthopedic appliances, the correction of visual defects, the 
services of special nurses, and special medication must be paid for by the 
student. The School does not accept responsibility for illness or accident 
occurring away from the community, or for expenses incurred for hospitali- 
zation or medical services in institutions other than the University Hos- 
pital, or, in any case, for medical expense not authorized by the Student 
Health Service. 

Every new student is required to undergo a complete physical examina- 
tion, which includes oral diagnosis. Any defects noted must be corrected 
within the first school year. The passing of this examination is a require- 
ment for the final acceptance of any student. 

Each matriculant must present, on the day of his enrollment, a state- 
ment from his ophthalmologist regarding the condition of his eyes, and 
where defects in vision exist he shall show evidence that corrections have been 
made. 

If a student should enter the hospital during the academic year, the 
Service will arrange for the payment of part or all of the hospital expenses, 
depending on the length of stay and the special expenses incurred. This 
arrangement applies only to students admitted through the office of the 
School physician. 

Prospective students are advised to have any known physical defects 
corrected before entering the School in order to prevent loss of time which 
later correction might involve. 

Scholarship and Loan Funds 

A number of scholarship loans from various organizations and educa- 
tional foundations are available to students in the School of Dentistry. These 
loans are offered on the basis of excellence in scholastic attainment and the 
need on the part of students for assistance in completing their course in 
dentistry. It has been the policy of the Faculty to recommend only students 
in the last two years for such privileges. 

The Edward S. Gaylord Educational Endowment Fund 

Under a provision of the will of the late Dr. Edward S. Gaylord, of 
New Haven, Connecticut, an amount approximating $16,000 was left to the 
Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, University of Mary- 
land, the proceeds of which are to be devoted to aiding worthy young men 
in securing dental education. 

20 



School of Dentistry 

The W \ K. Kellogg Foundation 

During World War II the Foundation recognized the burden that the 
accelerated course imposed upon many dental students who under normal 
circumstances would earn money for their education by employment during 
the summer vacation. The Foundation granted to this School a fund to 
provide rotating loans to deserving dental students. 

The Albert A. Harrington Fund 

This fund was established in 1954 by the New Jersey Alumni Association 
in memory of Dr. Albert A. Harrington, a member of the Class of 1910. 
The fund is a source of valuable help in aiding students to solve their 
temporary financial problems. 

The E. Benton Taylor Scholarship 

One of the finest scholarships in the field of dental education, the 
E. Benton Taylor Scholarship was conceived and arranged by Mrs. Taylor 
and will be perpetuated by the Luther B. Benton Company of Baltimore. It 
was put into operation in 1954 and will be awarded annually to a Maryland 
student of each entering class, who will continue to receive its benefits during 
the four years of his dental school course. 

The Student Senate-Alumni Fund 

This fund, created in 1960, was established for the purpose of aiding 
any student of the School who may be in need of an emergency loan. 

GENERAL INFORMATION FOR THE BALTIMORE UNION 

PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTIONS 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

The Baltimore Union for students of the Professional Schools is located 
adjacent to the Professional Schools at 621 West Lombard Street. Accommo- 
dations for 195 men are provided in a five-story semi-air-conditioned build- 
ing which also contains a cafeteria, fountain lounge, meeting rooms, laundry 
facilities, game room, bookstore, barber shop and lounges on each floor. 
Double rooms are available. The rental agreement is made for rooms only; 
meals are served cafeteria style on a cash basis. The contract for accommo- 
dations covers the academic year. 

ACADEMIC YEAR 

The Rates are: 

8150.00 per semester per double room 

S 60.00 per six weeks' summer session per doubleroom. 

21 



University of Maryland 

What the Rate covers: 

The rate shown above is per person and includes the following: 

Room furnishings, bed and cover, mattress, chest of drawers, closet, 

book shelves, desk, medicine cabinet, desk chair and desk lamp. 

Maid service will include cleaning of room twice per week and replace- 
ment of change of linen once each week. 

Telephone service is available through the Chesapeake & Potomac Tele- 
phone Company. Cost of the telephone is not included in the room rate. 
Information can be obtained from the Manager's Office. 

Mail service is also provided. 

The resident provides blankets, towels, pillow and linens. Towels and 
linens must be rented through the designated Commercial Rental Service. 

A small amount of luggage space is available. Storage of anything other 
than luggage will not be available. 



TRANSIENTS 

The Rates are: 

$ 4.00 per day 
$24.00 per week 

What the Rate covers: 

The services will include one bath and one face towel, one face cloth, 
soap and change of linen daily (once per week if weekly guest). 



HOW TO APPLY FOR A ROOM ASSIGNMENT 

Write for application form to 

DIRECTOR'S OFFICE 

The Baltimore Union 

621 West Lombard Street 

Baltimore 1, Maryland 



22 



School of Dentistry 



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24 



Description of Courses 



ANATOMY 

Professor: HAHN (HEAD OF DEPARTMENT). 

Associate Professor: piavis. 
Assistant Professor: SINNREICH. 

DRS. LINDENBERG, LOVEMAN, AND SACHS. 

Anat. 111. Human Gross Anatomy. (5-3) 

First year. This course consists of dissection and lectures, supplemented by frequent 
conferences and practical demonstrations. The entire human body is dissected. The 
subject is taught with the purpose of emphasizing the principles of the body structure, 
the knowledge of which is derived from a study of its organs and tissues, and the 
action of its parts. Arrangements can be made to accommodate qualified students 
and dentists interested in research or in making special dissections or topographical 
studies. 

Anat. 112. Human Neuroanatomy. (2) 

First year. Second semester. Prerequisite, Anatomy 111 or equivalent. Neuro- 
anatomy is offered in the Freshman year following Gross Anatomy. The work consists 
of a study of the whole brain and spinal cord by gross dissections and microscopic 
methods. Correlation is made, whenever possible, with the student's work in the histology 
and physiology of the central nervous system. 

Anat. 113. Comparative Tooth Morphology. (1) 

First year. Second semester. The course treats the evolutionary development of denti- 
tion as a necessary factor in the study of human oral anatomy. It includes a comparative 
study of the teeth of the animal kingdom, with a comparative study of the number, 
position and form of the teeth. 

25 



University of Maryland 



For Graduates 

Anat. 211. Human Gross Anatomy. (5-3) 

Same as course 111 but with additional work on a more advanced level. 

Anat. 212. Human Neuroanatomy. (2) 

Same as course 112 but with additional instruction of a more advanced nature. 

Anat. 214. The Anatomy of the Head and Neck. (3) 

One conference and two laboratory periods per week for one semester. 

Anat. 399. Research. 

Credit determined by amount and quality of work performed. 

BIOCHEMISTRY 

Professor: vanden bosche (head of department) 

MR. MORRIS AND MR. LEONARD. 

Biochem. 111. Principles of Biochemistry. (6) 

First year. Prerequisites inorganic and organic chemistry, with additional training in 
quantitative and physical chemistry desirable. Two lectures and one laboratory period 
throughout the year, with one conference period per week during the first eight weeks 
of Semester I. The chemistry of living matter forms the basis of the course. The 
detailed subject matter includes the chemistry of carbohydrates, fats, proteins, enzymes, 
vitamins, and hormones. The processes of respiration, digestion, metabolism, secretion 
and excretion are considered. Laboratory instruction in qualitative blood and urine 
examination is included. 

For Graduates 

Bichem. 211. Advanced Biochemistry. (6) 

Prerequisite Biochemistry 111. Two lectures, one conference and one laboratory period 

through the year. 

Biochem. 399. Research in Biochemistry. 
Prerequisite Biochemistry 211. 

DENTAL HISTORY AND LITERATURE 

Professor: FOLEY. 

Lit. 121. Oral and Written Communication. (2) 

Second year. A formal course of lectures is given in the second year. Many aspects 
of the instruction are given practical application in the third and fourth years. The 
course has many purposes, all of them contributing to the training of the students 
for effective participation in the extra-practice activities of the profession. Particular 
attention is given to instruction in the functioning of the agencies of communication 
in dentistry: the dental societies and the dental periodicals. The practical phases of 
the course include a thorough study of the preparations and uses of oral and written 
composition by the dental student and the dentist; the use of libraries; the com- 
pilation of bibliographies; the collection, the organization, and the use of information; 

26 



School of Dentistry 

the management of dental meetings; the oral presentation of papers, and professional 
correspondence. 

Lit. 141. Thesis. (2) 
Fourth year. 

Lit. 142. Dental History. (D 

Fourth year. Second semester. Lectures in Dental History describe the beginnings of 
the art of dental practice among ancient civilizations, its advancement in relation to the 
development of the so-called medical sciences in the early civilizations, its struggle 
through the Middle Ages and, finally, its attainment of recognized professional status in 
modern times. Special attention is given to the forces and stresses that have brought 
about the evolutionary progress from a primitive dental art to a scientific health service 
profession. 

DENTAL PROSTHESIS 

A. Removable Complete and Partial Prosthesis 

Professors: G. w. gaver (head of department) and ramsey. 
Associate Professors: oggesen and warner. 

DRS. GOETTEE, GORDON, WATSON, WRIGHT AND YENT. 

Pros. Ilia. Dental Materials. (4) 

First year. This course is designed to provide the student with a scientific background 
in the nomenclature, composition, physical properties, practical application, and proper 
manipulation of the important materials used in the practice of dentistry, excluding 
drugs and medicinals. 

The theoretical aspect of the course is presented in the form of lectures, demon- 
strations, informal group discussions, and directed supplemental reading. From the 
practical standpoint, the student manipulates and tests the various materials in the 
laboratory, being guided by prepared project sheets. The student develops an under- 
standing of these factors: the importance of scientific testing of a material before it 
i9 used by the profession at large; the realization that every material has its limitations, 
which can be compensated for only by intelligent application and manipulation; and 
an appreciation of the vast field of research open to those who wish to improve the 
materials now available. 

Pros. 112a. Introduction to Complete Denture Prosthesis. (1) 

First year. Second semester. This course is devoted to the manipulation of impression 
compound and the procedures used in developing impressions of edentulous arches, 
casts and bite plates. It embraces a series of lecture-demonstrations designed to give the 
student a knowledge of the essential fundamentals in complete denture construction. 

Pros. 121a. Complete Denture Prosthesis. (2) 

Second year. This course is given by lecture-demonstrations on bite registration, tooth 

arrangement, and final finish of complete dentures. 

Pros. 131a. Basic Clinical Complete Denture Prosthesis. (5) 

Third year. The course includes a study of the practical application in the clinic of 
the fundamentals taught in the preceding years. Demonstrations of the various technics 
of impression and bite taking are offered to provide the student with additional 
knowledge necessary for clinic work. 

27 






University of Maryland 

Pros. 133a. Introduction to Removable Partial Denture Prosthesis. (1) 
Third year. Second semester. This lecture-demonstration course embraces all phases 
of removable partial denture construction. Experiments and exercises are arranged 
to give the student the fundamentals in designing, casting and finishing partial dentures. 

Pros. 141a. Advanced Clinical Denture Prosthesis. (4) 

Fourth year. This course consists of the clinical application of the fundamentals 
taught in the previous years. Particular attention is given to a standard method of 
denture construction to equip the student with a basic technic for use in private practice. 



B. Fixed Partial Prosthesis 

Professor: nuttall (head of department). 
Associate Professors: dosh, mc lean-lu and oggesen. 
Assistant Professors: graham and willer. 

DRS. STEELE AND YENT. 

Pros. 122b. Principles of Fixed Partial Prosthesis. (6) 

Second year. This lecture and laboratory course is designed to provide a background 
of fundamental knowledge in fixed partial denture prosthesis. The interrelations of the 
biological and mechanical aspects of dentistry are emphasized. The principles involved 
and the procedures used in abutment preparations, the construction of fundamental 
retainers and pontic sections, and the assemblage of fixed bridge restorations are 
presented in detail and correlated with the requirements of occlusion. In addition to 
these procedures, the technics include impressions, wax manipulation, pattern construc- 
tion, investing and casting. 

Pros. 132b. Ceramic and Plastic Restorations. (2) 

Third year. First semester. This course presents the uses of porcelain and methyl 
methacrylate as restorative materials. Instruction is given in the procedures of prepara- 
tion, impressions, color selection, temporary protection and cementation. These materials 
are employed in the construction of complete veneer crowns and dowel crowns and in 
staining and glazing technics. 

Pros. 134b. Basic Clinical Fixed Partial Prosthesis. (4) 

Third year. This is a comprehensive course in the essential requirements for the 
successful use of the fixed partial denture. Special consideration is given to funda- 
mental factors in diagnosis, treatment planning and clinical procedures. The course 
integrates biological factors, mechanical principles and esthetic requirements with 
restorative treatment. Emphasis is placed on the physiological considerations as a 
basis for fixed partial denture service. 

Pros. 142b. Advanced Clinical Fixed Partial Prosthesis. (3) 

Fourth year. This course provides clinical training and experience for the student. 
The acquired background of knowledge is utilized in rendering treatment services for 
patients. Experience is gained in assessing completely the dental problem, planning 
a practical treatment consistent with the total dental needs and providing services 
which satisfy the objectives of prevention, function and esthetics. 

28 



School of Dentistry 



DIAGNOSIS 

Professor: BIDDIX (head of department). 
Assistant Professor: BRYANT. 

DRS. PALMER, LEBO AND SMITH. 

Diag. 131. Principles of Oral Diagnosis and Treatment Planning. (2) 

Third year. The fundamental principles and procedures in the diagnosis of oral and 

related diseases are studied by intimate clinical observation and discussion of interesting 

cases. The study of the oral cavity through an understanding of its relation to other 

parts of the body is emphasized. By means of consultations with other departments 

the procedures of a comprehensive diagnosis are developed and applied in treatment 

planning. 

Diag. 132. Seminar. 

Third year. The objective of this course is to teach the student to correlate clinical, 
roentgenologic and laboratory findings. Selected patients are presented by both medical 
and dental teachers. 

Diag. 141. Clinical Oral Diagnosis and Treatment Planning. (1) 
Fourth year. This course is a continuation of Diagnosis 131 and 132. 

HISTOLOGY 

Professor: provenza (head of department). 

DR. J. SEIPP. 

Hist. 111. Mammalian Histology and Embryology. (8) 

First year. The course embraces the thorough study of the cells, tissues, and organs 
of the various systems of the human body. Although certain aspects of the dental 
histology phase of the course are given strictly as special entities, many are included 
in the instruction in general histology, since the two areas are so intimately related when 
functional and clinical applications are considered. The instruction in embryology is 
correlated with that in histology. It covers the fundamentals of development of the 
human body, particular emphasis being given to the head and facial regions, the oral 
cavity, and the teeth and their adnexa. Specific correlations are also made with the 
other courses in the dental curriculum. 

For Graduates 

Hist. 212. Mammalian Histology and Embryology. (4-2) 

This course is the same as Histology 111, except that it does not include the dental 
phases of 111, but does include additional instruction and collateral reading of an 
advanced nature. 

Hist. 213. Mammalian Oral Histology and Embryology. (2) 

Prerequisite, Histology 111 or 212, or an equivalent course. This course covers the 
dental aspects of Histology 111, and includes additional instruction in the relations 
of histologic structure and embryologic development of the teeth, their adnexa, and 
the head and facial regions of the human body. 

29 



University of Maryland 



Hist. 216. Inheritance and Development Biology. (6) 

This course is concerned with the study of the embryogeny and fetal developments of 
vertebrate animals with special emphasis on mammalian embryology. In addition to 
tracing the development pattern, lectures are devoted to the discussion of inheritance 
mechanisms, gametogenesis and fertilization. 

Hist. 217. Comparative Animal Histology. (6) 

Prerequisite, Hist. Ill, 212-213, or an equivalent course. This course is concerned with 
a comparative study of the morphology, structure and function of the cells, tissues and 
organs as found in representative members of the animal kingdom. Special emphasis is 
placed on techniques and research methods. 

Hist. 218. Experimental Embryology. (4) 

Second semester of every year. Prerequisite, Hist. 216, or an equivalent course. This 
course is concerned with the historical and recent aspects of experimental embryology 
from both the applied and theoretical standpoint. Each student will be assigned a special 
problem in addition to the scheduled lectures. 

Hist. 219. Radiation Biology. (4) 

First semester of odd numbered years. The primary aim of this course is to familiarize 
the student with the techniques of handling radioactive isotopes as applied in biological 
research. The topics covered in the course are: the physics of radioactivity from the 
standpoint of the biological researcher; the selection of isotopes for specific investiga- 
tions; the effects of radioactivity on cells, tissues and systems; the effect of radioactivity 
on inheritance; the role of environment on the effectiveness of radioactivity; and certain 
phases of laboratory health physics. The laboratory will be concerned with the use and 
location as well as recording and interpreting data of isotopes as applied to biological 
research. 

Hist. 220. Physical Methods in Histology. (4) 

First semester of even numbered years. The course introduces the graduate student 
to some of the more frequently employed techniques in cytological and histological 
research. Exercises are designed for the operation and interpretation of data derived 
from the use of available research tools. Two one-hour lectures and one four-hour 
laboratory period per week. Consent of department head required. 

Hist. 320. Seminar. (2) 

Hist. 399. Research. 

(Number of hours and credit by arrangement.) 



MEDICINE 
A. General Medicine 
Associate Professor: MC lean. 

DRS. FRAVEL, LEONARD AND OGDEN. 

Med. 121a. First Aid. 

Second year. Second semester. In this course the student is instructed in the basic 

principles of first aid. 

30 



School of Dentistry 

Med. 132a. Principles of Medicine. (2) 

Third year. The course is taught by lectures, visual aids and x-ray demonstrations 

of diseases of the cardiorespiratory, gastro-intestinal, genitourinary and nervous systems. 

Med. 141a. Physical Diagnosis. (1) 

Fourth year. First semester. Slides and clinical demonstrations are used to show the 
methods of recognition of important objective signs as they relate to body disturb- 
ances. The methods of taking blood pressure and its significance, also the recognition 
and treatment of medical emergencies, are taught. 

Med. 142a. Principles of Medicine. (2) 

Fourth year. Throughout the year the entire class is taken into the hospital for medical 
clinics where the close application of medical and dental knowledge in history taking, 
diagnosis, laboratory procedures and treatment is emphasized. 

Med. 143a. Preventive and Public Health Dentistry. (1) 

Fourth year. Second semester. The objectives of this course are to emphasize those 
measures other than remedial operations that will tend to minimize the occurrence or 
the extension of oral disease, and to outline the status of dentistry in the field of gen- 
eral public health. The relations of dentistry with other phases of public health are 
discussed, as are the problems affecting the administration of dental health programs. 
Special effort is made to demonstrate methods and materials suitable for use in dental 
health education programs. 

Med. 144a. Clinical Conferences. 

Fourth year. Throughout the year small groups of students are taken into the hospital 

for medical ward rounds, demonstrations and discussions. 



B. Oral Medicine 
Associate Professor: abramson. 
Assistant Professor: norris. 

DRS. T. F. CLEMENT AND KOLAKOWSKI. 

Med. 121b. Principles of Endodontics. (1) 

Second year. The lecture phase presents the fundamentals necessary for endodontic 

procedures; the indications and contraindications for these procedures; the methods 

used in performing the necessary steps to preserve the functions of the teeth and to 

maintain the health of the individual. The laboratory phase is designed to teach the 

student the materials, the instrumentation, and the techniques employed in endodontic 

treatment. 

Med. 122b. Introduction to Periodontics. (1) 

Second year. The lectures place special emphasis on the importance of oral hygiene 
and its relation to the prevention of all dental disorders. The causes, results, and 
treatment of unhygienic conditions of the oral cavity are fully considered. Demon- 
strations are given in the prophylactic treatment of the mouth and in the accepted 
methods of tooth brushing to be used in home care. In the laboratory the student 
learns on special manikins the use of the periodontal instruments. By progressive 
exercises and drills he is taught the basic principles of good operating procedure and 
the methods of thorough prophylactic treatment. 

31 



University of Maryland 

Med. 131b. Basic Clinical Endodontics. (1) 

Third year. The lectures present the etiology, clinical symptoms, diagnosis, prognosis, 
and methods of treatment of the various forms of traumatic injuries to teeth. The 
student applies the fundamentals he has learned in the second year, by performing 
endodontic procedures on clinical cases. 

Med. 132b. Basic Clinical Periodontics. (1) 

Third year. The lectures present the etiology, clinical symptoms, diagnosis, prognosis, 
and methods of treatment of the various forms of periodontal disease, other diseases 
of the oral cavity, and lesions of the lips, cheeks, and tongue. The recognition of 
periodontal disease in its incipient forms and the importance of early treatment are 
stressed. The lectures are well illustrated by color slides, moving pictures, and other 
visual aids. The Junior student is required to apply the fundamentals he has learned 
by performing periodontal procedures on a prescribed number of clinical cases. 

Med. 141b. Advanced Clinical Endodontics. (1) 

Fourth year. During his Senior year the student performs the more advanced endodontic 

procedures on clinical cases. 

Med. 142b. Advanced Clinical Periodontics. (1) 

Fourth year. The Senior student performs the periodontal procedures on clinical patients 

exhibiting the more advanced periodontal problems. 

MICROBIOLOGY 

Professor: shay (head of department). 

MR. BECKER. 

Microbiol. 121. Dental Microbiology and Immunology. (4) 

Second year. First semester. The course embraces lectures, laboratory, demonstra- 
tions, recitations, and group conferences, augmented by guided reading. Practical and 
theoretical consideration is given to pathogenic bacteria, viruses, yeasts and molds. 
Special attention is given to those organisms which cause lesions in and about the 
oral cavity, particularly primary focal infections about the teeth, tonsils, etc., which 
result in the establishment of secondary foci. Immunological and serological prin- 
ciples are studied, with special consideration being given to hypersensitivity resulting 
from the use of antibiotics, vaccines, antigens, and other therapeutic agents. 

Laboratory teaching includes the methods of staining and the cultural charac- 
teristics of microorganisms; their reaction to disinfectants, antiseptics, and germicides; 
methods of sterilization and asepsis; animal inoculation; preparation of sera, vaccines, 
and antitoxins; a study of antibiotics; and a demonstration of virus techniques. In all 
phases of the course emphasis is placed on dental applications. 

For Graduates 

Microbiol. 200, 201. Chemotherapy. (1-2) 

Prerequisite Microbiology 121 or equivalent. One lecture a week. Offered in alter- 
nate years. A study of the chemistry, toxicity, pharmacology and therapeutic value of 
drugs employed in the treatment of disease. 

Microbiol. 202, 203. Reagents and Media. (1, 1) 

One lecture a week. Offered in alternate years. A study of the methods of preparation- 

and use of bacteriological reagents and media. 

32 



School of Dentistry 

Microbiol. 210. Special Problems in Microbiology. 

Credit determined by amount and quality of work performed. Laboratory course. 

Microbiol. 211. Public Health. (1-2) 

Prerequisite Microbiology 121 or equivalent. Lectures and discussions on the organiza- 
tion and administration of state and municipal health departments and private health 
agencies. The course also includes a study of laboratory methods. 

Microbiol. 399. Research ip Microbiology. 

Credit determined by amount and quality of work performed. 

OPERATIVE DENTISTRY 

Professor: MEDINA (head of department). 

Associate Professors: C. J. GAVER and LOUIE. 

Assistant Professors: H. M. clement, diaz and edmond g. vanden bosche. 

DRS. BEAVEN, BIANCO, CROUSE, HEESE, JAGIELSKI AND VELTRE. 

Oper. 111. Tooth Morphology. (3) 

First year. Second semester. This course is designed to teach the form and functions 
and the relationships of the teeth, and includes a study of the nomenclature of sur- 
faces, divisions and relations of the teeth. In the laboratory the student is trained 
in the carving of the various teeth and in the dissection of extracted teeth through 
their various dimensions. 

The second part of the course includes a study of the supporting structures of the 
teeth and of the relation of the teeth to these structures. The periods of beginning 
calcification, eruption, complete calcification, and shedding of the deciduous teeth; 
followed by the periods of beginning calcification, eruption, and complete calcification 
of the permanent teeth, are studied and correlated with the growth in size of the 
jaws and face. 

Oper. 121. Fundamentals of Operative Dentistry. (5) 

Second year. The student is trained in the technical procedures of cavity prepara- 
tion and the manipulation of the restorative materials employed in the treatment of 
diseases and injuries of the tooth structure. These basic principles are applied on 
composition teeth and extracted natural teeth. Instruction includes twenty-six lectures 
and forty-eight three-hour laboratory periods. 

Oper. 131. Basic Clinical Operative Dentistry. (4) 

Third year. This course is a continuing development of the fundamentals taught in 
Operative 121. The objective is to present the additional information which is necessary 
for the management of practical cases. Instruction includes lectures, demonstrations 
and clinical practice in which the student treats patients under the individual guidance 
of staff members. 

Oper. 141. Advanced Clinical Operative Dentistry. (6) 

Fourth year. With the background provided by Operative 121 and 131, the student 
is able to comprehend and apply the procedures for treating the more complicated 
operative problems. The objectives of this course are to instruct the student in the 
different procedures by which a comprehensive operative service can be rendered 
and to acquaint him with as many unusual clinical cases as possible. Instruction 
includes lectures, demonstrations, and clinical practice. 

33 



University of Maryland 

ORTHODONTICS 

Professor: preis (head of department). 

Assistant Professors: cullen, kress, shehan and swinehart. 

DR. DEEMS. 

Ortho. 131. Principles of Orthodontics. (2) 

Third year. The course consists of lectures supplemented by slides and motion pic- 
tures. The subject matter includes the history of orthodontics and the study of growth 
and development, evolution of human dental occlusion, forces of occlusion, etiology of 
malocclusion, aberrations of the maxilla and mandible which affect occlusion, and tissue 
changes incident to tooth movement. 

Ortho. 141. Clinical Orthodontics. (1) 

Fourth year. Students are assigned in small groups to the Clinic where patients are 
given a thorough dental examination. Under the direction of an instructor each case 
is diagnosed, methods of procedure are explained, and treatment planning is out- 
lined. In the more simple cases therapy is undertaken by the student under the 
supervision of an instructor. Students, therefore, have the opportunity of applying 
clinically the knowledge which they received during their Junior year. 

PATHOLOGY 

Professor: m. s. aisenberg (head of department). 
Associate Professor: Gardner. 
Assistant Professor: A. D. AISENBERG. 
DR. GRANRUTH. 

Path. 121. General Pathology. (4) 

Second year. Second semester. The general principles of disease processes and tissue 
reactions, both gross and microscopic, are taught with the objectives of training the 
student to recognize and be familiar with the abnormal and of creating a foundation 
for further study in the allied sciences. Emphasis is placed upon those diseases in 
the treatment of which medicodental relationships are to be encountered. 

Path. 131. Oral Pathology. (3) 

Third year. First semester. The course includes a study of the etiology and the 
gross and microscopic manifestations of diseases of the teeth and their investing 
structures: pathologic dentition, dental anomalies, periodontal diseases, calcific de- 
posits, dental caries, pulpal diseases, dentoalveolar abscesses, oral manifestations of 
systemic diseases, cysts of the jaws, and benign and malignant lesions in and about 
the oral cavity. 

Path. 141. Seminar. 

Fourth year. This constitutes a part of the cancer teaching program sponsored by a 
grant from the United States Public Health Service. It is conducted by visiting lec- 
turers who are specialists in their respective fields. 

For Graduates 

Path. 211. Advanced Oral Pathology. (8) 

Two lectures and two laboratory periods throughout the year. This course is pre- 

34 



School of Dentistry 



sented with the objective of correlating a knowledge of histopathology with the 
various aspects of clinical practice. Studies of surgical and biopsy specimens are stressed. 

Path. 399. Research. 

Time and credit by arrangement. Research in areas of particular interest to the student. 

PEDODONTICS 

Associate Professor: sanders. 
Assistant Professor: EHRLICH. 
DRS. FERLITA, GIARDINA AND KIHN. 

Ped. 121. Technics of Pedodontics. (1) 

Second year. Second semester. This laboratory course in dentistry for children consists 
of eight lectures and sixteen laboratory periods. Demonstrations and visual aids are 
utilized to augment the teaching procedure. The work is performed on model teeth 
in primary dentoforms and consists of exercises in cavity preparation in primary 
teeth for the proper reception of different restorative materials, in the technic of 
restoring a fractured young permanent anterior tooth, and in the construction of a basic 
type of space maintainer. 

Ped. 131. Clinical Pedodontics. (2) 

Third year. The student is introduced to clinical dentistry for children. He utilizes the 
technical procedures learned in the laboratory. Didactic instruction includes sixteen 
lectures offered during the first semester. Emphasis is given to the management of the 
child patient with necessary modifications for behavior problems. The indications and 
contraindications for pulpal therapy are evaluated for the purpose of rational tooth 
conservation. Oral hygiene, roentgenology, growth and development, and caries sus- 
ceptibility tests are taught. Training in preventive orthodontics is given for true 
denture guidance and to allow the student to institute interceptive or early remedial 
measures in incipient deformities. 

The Department endeavors to develop in the student a comprehensive interest 
in guiding the child patient through the period of the mixed dentition. A separate 
clinic, equipped with child-size chairs and supervised by the pedodontics staff, provides 
adequate opportunity for clinical applications of the methods taught in laboratory 
and lectures. 

Ped. 141. Clinical Pedondontics. (1) 

Fourth year. The student continues his clinical training throughout the year and 
is assigned the more difficult cases. In addition, the senior student is assigned to a 
public health clinic which consists of individual, completely equipped operating rooms 
giving the student experience in the management and treatment of the child patient. 

PHARMACOLOGY 

Professor: DOBBS (HEAD OF DEPARTMENT). 

Assistant Professors: dolle and ross. 

Pharmacol. 131. General Pharmacology and Therapeutics. (4) 

Third year. The course is designed to provide a general survey of pharmacology, 

affording the students the necessary knowledge for the practice of rational therapeutics. 



University of Maryland 

The course is taught by lectures, laboratory and demonstrations. The first semester 
consists of sixteen hours of didactic work including instruction in the sites and modes 
of drug action, prescription writing, and the pharmacodynamics and therapeutics 
of the local-acting drugs. The second semester consists of thirty-two hours of didactics 
and forty-eight hours of laboratory instruction. The laboratory experiments are per- 
formed on students and on animals and are designed to demonstrate the direct effects 
of drugs on vital tissues. The subject material consists of the pharmacodynamics of the 
systemic-acting drugs and the anti-infective agents. In the therapeutics phase the 
students are instructed in the use of drugs for the prevention, treatment, and correction 
of general and oral diseases. 

Pharmacol. 141. Oral Therapeutics. (1) 

Fourth year. First semester. This course consists of sixteen hours of lectures and 
demonstrations. It is designed to acquaint the students with the practical applications 
of pharmacology in the treatment of dental and oral diseases. Particular emphasis is 
given to the newer drugs and the more recent advances in therapeutics. Patients from 
the dental clinics and the hospital are used for demonstrations whenever possible. 
A correlation of theory with clinical practice is obtained by chairside instruction on 
patients in the dental clinic. 

Pharmacol. 142. Nutritional Therapeutics. (1) 

Fourth year. First semester. This course consists of sixteen hours of lectures and 
demonstrations devoted to the principles and practices of nutritional therapeutics. The 
presentation includes a study of the dietary requirements of essential food substances 
in health and disease. The vitamin and mineral deficiency states with their pathology 
and symptomatology are presented with suggestions for dietary and drug therapy 
Metabolic diseases are discussed, and their effects on the nutritional states are con 
sidered. Students are taught to plan diets for patients with various nutritional prob 
lems, such as those resulting from loss of teeth, the use of new dental appliances 
dental caries, stomatitis, cellulitis, osteomyelitis, and bone fractures. A project stud^ 
is made by each student which includes analyses of his basal metabolic requirement, 
his total energy requirement, and his dietary intake in relation to his daily needs. 



PHYSIOLOGY 

Professor: white (head of department). 
Associate Professors: shipley and pollack. 

DR. BUXBAUM AND MRS. STALING. 

Physiol. 121. Principles of Physiology. (6) 

Second year. A fundamental objective of this course is to achieve an integration of 

basic scientific phenomena of function as they relate to the organism as a whole. 

Lectures deal with the principal fields of physiology, including heart and circula- 
tion, peripheral and central nervous functions, respiration, digestion, muscular ac- 
tivity, hepatic and renal functions, water and electrolyte balance, special senses, gen- 
eral and cellular metabolism, endocrines and reproduction. In the laboratory work 
(first semester) the classic experiments on frog and turtle muscle and heart function 
are followed by more advanced work on rabbits, cats, dogs and the students them- 
selves. A special series of lectures is devoted to the application of basic physiologic 
principles to human clinical problems. 



36 



School of Dentistry 



For Graduates 



Physiol. 211. Principles of Mammalian Physiology. (6) 

Prerequisite permission from the department. Same as course 121 but with collateral 

reading arfd additional instruction. 

Physiol. 212. Advanced Physiology. 

Hours and credit by arrangement. Lectures and seminars during the second semester. 

Physiol 399. Research. 

Hours and credits by arrangement. 

PRACTICE ADMINISTRATION 

PROFESSOR: BIDDIX. 

DR. LOVETT AND MR. O'DONNELL. 

Pract. Adm. 141. Principles of Administration. (1) 

Fourth year. Second semester. The objective of this course is to prepare students to 
assume the social, economic and professional responsibilities of dental practice. The 
lectures embrace the selection of the office location and office equipment, the basis 
of determining fees, the methods of collecting accounts, the use of auxiliary personnel, 
and the choice of various types of insurance and investments. A comprehensive 
bookkeeping system for a dental office is explained. 

Pract. Adm. 142. Ethics. (1) 

Fourth year. First semester. The course includes lectures on general ethics and its 
basic teachings, and an interpretation of the philosophical principles adopted by the 
American Dental Association and embodied in its "Principles of Ethics." 

Pract. Adm. 143. Jurisprudence. (1) 

Fourth year. First semester. The objective of the course is to acquaint the dental 
student with the fundamentals of law as they relate to the dentist and to his patients. 
The sources of law, and types of courts and court procedures are explained; the 
student is acquainted with the special statutory provisions pertaining to the regula- 
tion of the practice of dentistry, as well as the dentist's responsibilities under the 
criminal law. The respective rights and liabilities of both the dentist and his patients 
are considered in lectures dealing with contracts and torts; practical illustrations of 
these rights and liabilities are reviewed in the light of actual reported cases in the 
courts. 

ROENTGENOLOGY 

Professor: BIDDIX. 

DRS. DARBY AND KLEIN. 

Roentgenol. 131. Principles of Denial Roentgenology. (2) 

Third year. The lectures include a study of the physical principles involved in the 
production of x-rays and a discussion of their properties and effects, the hazards of 
roentgenography to both operator and patient, the technics of taking roentgenograms, 
and the processing of the films. The conference periods deal with the roentgeno- 
graphic study of the normal anatomic structures in health and the variations noted 
-under various pathologic conditions. 

37 



University of Maryland 

Roentgenol. 132. Introduction to Clinical Dental Roentgenology. 

Third year. Second semester. The division of the class into small groups permits 
individual supervision in the clinical application of the material presented in Roent- 
genol. 131. Under guidance the student learns to correctly place, expose and process 
the film and mount a full series of dental roentgenograms. 

Roentgenol. 141. Clinical Dental Roentgenology. (1) 

Fourth year. Under a system of rotating assignments students are placed in constant 
association with the routine practical use of the roentgen ray. They are required to 
master the fundamental scientific principles and to acquire technical skill in taking, 
processing, and interpreting all types of intraoral and extraoral films. 



SURGERY 
Professors: dorsey (head of department), helrich, robinson and yeager. 
Associate Professor: cappuccio. 
Assistant Professors: SIWINSKI AND inman. 

DRS. CAMP AND RICHMOND. 

Surg. 131. Anesthesiology. (2) 

Third year. Local anesthesia is taught in both principle and practice. In lectures 
and clinics all types of intraoral, extraoral, conduction and infiltration injections; 
the anatomical relation of muscles and nerves; the theory of action of anesthetic 
agents and their toxic manifestations are taught. Demonstrations are given in con- 
duction and infiltration technics; students give injections under the supervision of an 
instructor. General anesthesia is taught in lectures and clinic demonstrations. The 
action of the anesthetic agents, methods of administration, indications and contra- 
indications, and the treatment of toxic manifestations are included. Demonstrations 
are given in the preparation of the patient, the administration of all general anes- 
thetics (inhalant, rectal, spinal, and intravenous) , and the technics for oral opera- 
tions. Clinics are held in the Department of Oral Surgery in the Dental School and 
in the Hospital. 

Surg. 132. Oral Surgery. (3) 

Third year. The course consists of lectures on the principles of surgery, the classifica- 
tion of teeth for extraction, and the pre- and postoperative treatment of ambulatory 
patients. The student is assigned to the Department of Oral Surgery on a rotating 
schedule and is required to produce local anesthesia and extract teeth under the 
supervision of an instructor. 

Surg. 141. Oral Surgery. (3) 

Fourth year. This course consists of lectures, clinical assignments, and practical 
demonstrations on the etiology, pathology, diagnosis and treatment of all classes of 
tumors, infections, deformities, anomalies, impacted teeth, fractures and surgical 
problems associated with the practice of dentistry. Hospital clinics, demonstrations 
and ward rounds are given to familiarize the student with abnormal conditions inci- 
dent to the field of his future operations and to train him thoroughly in the diagnosis 
of benign and malignant tumors. Weekly seminars are held in the Hospital. 

38 



School of Dentistry 



For Graduates 



Surg. 201. Clinical Anesthesiology. (6) 
Forty hours a week for thirteen weeks. 

Surg. 220. General Dental Oral Surgery. (4) 

Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week for one semester. 

Surg. 221. Advanced Oral Surgery. (4) 

Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week for one semester. 

Surg. 399. Research. 

Time and credit by arrangement. 



VISUAL AIDS IN TEACHING 

MR. TAYLOR AND STAFF. 

The Department of Visual Aids employs the latest photographic technics 
and equipment for the production of both monochromatic and full-color still 
and motion pictures. By cooperation with other departments new material is 
developed for lectures, clinics, publications and exhibits. 

Through photography the School retains for teaching purposes interest- 
ing cases that appear in the clinics, preserves evidence of unusual pathological 
cases, and records anatomical anomalies, facial disharmonies and malocclu- 
sions of the teeth. In addition the student, through his contact with photo- 
graphic uses, becomes acquainted with the value of photography in clinical 
practice. Students are advised as to the use of visual aids in the preparation 
of lectures and theses, the arrangement and co-ordination of materials, and 
the organization and maintenance of records and histories. 

Various art media and the use of modern plastics supplement photog- 
raphy. By the combination and correlation of these methods all departments 
are provided with an unlimited supply of valuable and often irreplaceable 
visual aids. 

A closed circuit television system is used to enable large groups to 
visualize clinical and laboratory procedures. Close-up pictures of the vari- 
ous operations are made possible for comfortable viewing in lecture hall 
and laboratory. 



SPECIAL COURSES 

Summer Courses 

As the need arises, summer courses may be offered in certain subjects 
included in the regular curriculum. A charge of $12.00 for each semester 
hour credit is made for these courses. 

39 



University of Maryland 

The Gorgas Odontological Society 

The Gorgas Odontological Society was organized in 1916 as an honorary 
student dental society with scholarship as a basis for admission. The Society 
was named after Dr. Ferdinand J. S. Gorgas, a pioneer in dental education, a 
teacher of many years' experience, and during his life a great contributor to 
dental literature. It was with the idea of perpetuating his name that the 
Society adopted it. 

To be eligible for membership a student must be in the first 30 per cent 
of his class. The selection of this 30 per cent shall be based on the weighted 
percentage average system as outlined in the school regulations. The meet- 
ings, held once each month, are addressed by prominent dental and medical 
men, an effort being made to obtain speakers not connected with the Univer- 
sity. The members have an opportunity, even while students, to hear men 
associated with other educational institutions. 

Omicron Kappa Upsilon 
Phi Chapter of Omicron Kappa Upsilon, honorary dental society, was 
chartered at the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, Uni- 
versity of Maryland during the session of 1928-29. Membership in the society 
is awarded to a number not exceeding 12 per cent of the graduating class. 
This honor is conferred upon students who through their professional course 
of study creditably fulfill all obligations as students, and whose conduct, 
earnestness, evidence of good character and high scholarship recommend 
them to election. 

The following graduates of the 1961 Class were elected to membership. 

Gilbert Samuel Berman Roy Mitsuaki Naito 

Lester Malcolm Breen Antone Travers Oliveira, Jr. 

William Joseph Girotti Peter Paul Ryiz 

Raymond Emil Goepfrich Frank Joseph Sinnreich, Jr. 

Aaron Rufus Griffith, Jr. James Miller Steig 

Edward Salters McCallum, Jr. Stanley Leonard Zakarin 

Alumni Asociation 
The first annual meeting of the Society of the Alumni of the Baltimore 
College of Dental Surgery was held in Baltimore, March 1, 1849. This 
organization has continued in existence to the present, its name having been 
changed to The Alumni Association of the Baltimore College of Dental 
Surgery, Dental School, University of Maryland. 

The officers to the Alumni Association for 1960-61 are as follows: 
President President Elect 

Joseph P. Cappuccio Lewis C. Toomey 

1010 St. Paul Street 8641 Colesville Road 

Baltimore 2, Maryland Silver Spring, Maryland 

40 .' 



School of Dentistry 
First Vice President Second Vice President 

E. MlLBURN COLVIN, Jr. FRANK P. GlLLEY, Jr. 

1726 21st Street, N. W. 135 Broadway 

Washington 9, D. C. Portland, Maine 

Past President {Ex-Officio) Secretary 

Daniel F. Lynch Calvin J. Gaver 

1401 16th Street, N. W. 1427 Kirkwood Road 

Washington 6, D. C. Baltimore 7, Maryland 

Treasurer Editor 

C. Adam Bock Kyrle W. Preis 

823 Park Avenue 700 Cathedral Street 

Baltimore 2, Maryland Baltimore 1, Maryland 

Historian-Librarian 

J. Ben Robinson 
200 Headington Court 
Lutherville, Maryland 



University Alumni Council Representatives 

Harry Levin— 1962 Edward D. Stone— 1963 

Baltimore, Maryland Baltimore, Maryland 

Charles E. Broadrup — 1964 
Frederick, Maryland 

EXECUTIVE COUNCIL 

Joseph P. Cappuccio Kyrle W. Preis 

Baltimore, Maryland Baltimore, Maryland 

C. Adam Bock Daniel F. Lynch 

Baltimore, Maryland Washington, D. C. 

Calvin J. Gaver E. Milburn Colvin, Jr. 

Baltimore, Maryland Washington, D. C. 

Lewis C. Toomey Frank P. Gilley, Jr. 

Silver Spring, Maryland Portland, Maine 

J. Ben Robinson 
Lutherville. Marvland 



41 



University of Maryland 

ELECTED MEMBERS 
Executive Council 

L. Lynn Emmart George M. Anderson 

Baltimore, Maryland Baltimore, Maryland 

J. Philip Norris William W. Noel 

Baltimore, Maryland Hagerstown, Maryland 

Eugene A. Leatherman Russell P. Smith, Jr. 

Randallstown, Maryland Cambridge, Maryland 

ENDOWMENT FUND 

TRUSTEES EX-OFFICIO 

Joseph P. Cappuccio, President 
Lewis C Toomey, President-Elect 

Myron S. Aisenberg, Dean 

C. Adam Bock, Treasurer 

Calvin J. Gaver, Secretary 

ELECTED TRUSTEES 

Arthur I. Bell — 1962 Jesse Trager — 1963 

Maryland Maryland 

Ashur G. Chavoor — 1962 Howard Van Natta — 1964 

Washington, D. C. Maryland 

Peter T. Kanelos— 1963 Gerard A. Devlin— 1964 

Rhode Island New Jersey 

SENIOR PRIZE AWARDS 

The following prizes were awarded to members of the Senior Class for 
the 1960-61 Session: 

The Alumni Association Medal 
For Thesis 

BILL EDWARD TAYLOR 

The Harry E. Kelsey Award 

(Contributed by former associates of Dr. Kelsey: 

Drs. Anderson, Devlin, Hodges, Johnston and Preis) 

For Professional Demeanor 

LAWRENCE LEO CLARK 

42 



School of Dentistry 

The Harry E. Latcham Memorial Medal 
For Complete Oral Operative Restoration 

RONALD WESLEY HIGEL 

Honorable Mention Joseph Michael Pistoria 



The Edgar J. Jacques Memorial Award 
For Meritorious Work in Practical Oral Surgery 

SANFORD KATSUMI KAMEZAWA 



The Herbert Friedberg Memorial Award 

(Contributed by the New Jersey Alumni Chapter of the 

National Alumni Association) 

For Achievement by a New Jersey Senior 

LAWRENCE LEO CLARK 



The Katharine Toomey Plaque 
(Conrtibuted by Dr. and Mrs. Lewis C. Toomey) 
For Devotion to the School and to the Profession 

GEORGE FRANKLIN BUCHNESS 

The Timothy 0. Heatwole Chair 
To the Senior Who Has Best Exemplified the Qualities 
of Ethical Standards, Kindnesses and Humanitarianism 

WILLIAM PAUL HOFFMAN, JR. 

The Harry B. Schwartz Award 
For Meritorious Work in Fixed Partial Prosthesis 

JOHN GEORGE GOETTEE, JR. 

The Sigma Epsilon Delta Memorial Medal 
For Highest Average in Basic Sciences 

AARON RUFUS GRIFFITH, JR. 



University of Maryland 

Honors 

University Gold Medal for Scholarship, Summa Cum Laude 
Awarded to 

Frank Joseph Sinnreich, Jr. 

Certificates of Honor, Magna Cum Laude 
Awarded to 

Gilbert Samuel Berman Antone Travers Oliveira, Jr. 

Raymond Emil Goepfrich Aaron Rufus Griffith, Jr. 

Peter Paul Ryiz 

Cum Laude 

Lester Malcolm Breen Roy Mitsuaki Naito 

William Joseph Girotti James Miller Steig 

Edward Salters McCallum, Jr. Stanley Leonard Zakarin 

Degree Conferred August 1, 1961 

Paul Wilfred Achin, Providence College Massachusetts 

Joseph Edward Furtado, B.A., Providence College, 1954 Rhode Island 

Edward Allen Hurdle, Jr., B.S., Loyola College, 1956 Maryland 

Alvin Wesley Kagey, B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1957 Maryland 

Douglas Kaplan, B.A., Alfred University, 1957 New Jersey 

Sol Benjamin Love, Georgetown University District of Columbia 

Joseph Robert Marchesani, LaSalle College New Jersey 

Theodore Almada Rosa, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 

District of Columbia 

Hershel Garvin Sawyer, A.B., Berea College, 1957 West Virginia 

Arthur Hein Streeter, B.S., Washington College, 1957 Maryland 

William Herbert Witherspoon, West Virginia University Pennsylvania 

GRADUATING CLASS 

1960-1961 Session 

Earl Robert Alban, Jr., B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1954 Maryland 

Morris Antonelli, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 _ -District of Columbia 

Gilbert Samuel Berman, B.S., University of Maryland, 1957 Maryland 

Cecil Samuel Boland, B.S., Newberry College, 1957 Maryland 

Lester Malcolm Breen, Emory University Georgia 

Donald Acker Michael Brown, B.A., St. John's College 1951 Maryland 

Douglas Adams Bryans, B.S., Springfield College, 1957 Massachusetts 

George Franklin Buchness, B.S., Loyola College, 1948; M.S., Catholic 

University, 1954 Maryland 

Richard Mario Carmosino, A.B., Boston University, 1957 Massachusetts 

44 



School of Dentistry 

Thomas J. Cavanaugh, B.S., University of Maryland, 1957 Maryland 

Lawrence Leo Clark, Mount Saint Mary's College New Jersey 

James Richard Crouse, Shepherd College Maryland 

Billy Hugh Darke, B.S.^ Western Kentucky State College, 1954 Kentucky 

William Lawrence Doheny, Jr., University of Maryland Connecticut 

Edward Cornelius Doherty, B.A., Boston College, 1957 Massachusetts 

Marlin Duane Dunker, B.A., Walla Walla College, 1955 California 

William Duane Fitzgerald, University of Massachusetts Massachusetts 

Sheldon Donald Fliss, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

Richard Arnold Foer, B.S., University of Maryland, 1957 

District of Columbia 
William Joseph Girotti, B.A., American International College, 1957 

Massachusetts 
Raymond Emil Goepfrich, B.S., Franklin and Marshall College, 1957 

Pennsylvania 

John George Goette, Jr., B.A., Western Maryland College, 1957 Maryland 

Aaron Rufus Griffith, Jr., University of South Carolina South Carolina 

Sheldon Gerald Gross, University of Vermont Massachusetts 

Stanford Edgar Hamburger, B.A., University of Maryland, 1957 _ -Maryland 

Arnold Hecht, University of Miami Florida 

Ronald Wesley Higel, University of Florida Florida 

William Paul Hoffman, Jr., Earlham College District of Columbia 

Patrick Francis Iacovelli, Jr., B.S., Boston College, 1952 Massachusetts 

Ronald Harold Israel, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

Sanford Katsumi Kamezawa, University of California Hawaii 

Stanley Paul Kaminski, B.A., Seton Hall University, 1957 New Jersey 

George Theodore Keary, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 Massachusetts 

Michael Edward Kolakowski, Jr., B.S., University of Maryland, 1957 

Maryland 

Robert George Kovack, B.S., Albright College, 1957 New Jersey 

Ralph Leonard Kroopnick, B.A., University of Connecticut, 1957 

Connecticut 

Robert Maurice Lattanzi, Albertus Magnus College Connecticut 

Jack Edward Liller, University of Richmond Maryland 

Arnold Irvin Loew, University of Miami Florida 

Edward Salters McCallum, Newberry College South Carolina 

William Edward McLaughlin, Mount Saint Mary's College New York 

Richard Madison Marrone, B.S., University of Maryland, 1957 Maryland 

Alan J. Martin, Ohio University Florida 

Robert Cameron Mason, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

Michael Charles Matzkin, B.A., Dartmouth College, 1957 Connecticut 

Robert Francis Meier, Mount Saint Mary's College New York 

Marc Julian Meyers, B.A., Western Maryland College, 1957 Maryland 

Ronald Britton Morley, B.A., Maryville College, 1957 New York 

Clarence John Myatt, A.B., St. Michael's College, 1957 Massachusetts 

Roy Mitsuaki Naito, B.A., University of Hawaii, 1956 Hawaii 

Antone Travers Oliveria, Jr., B.S., Tufts College, 1957 Massachusetts 

45 



University of Maryland 

James Edward Palmer, University of Maryland Maryland 

David Bertram Pere, University of Miami . .. Florida 

Albert Perlmutter, A.B., Boston University, 1957 Massachusetts 

Garr Thomas Phelps, Xavier University Kentucky 

Joseph Michael Pistoria, Seton Hall University New Jersey 

Edwin Stuart Raffel, B.S., University of Maryland, 1956 Maryland 

Malcolm Sidney Renbaum, B.S., Johns Hopkins University, 1956 — Maryland 

John Filmore Robinson, Loyola College Maryland 

William Otis Rockefeller, B.S., University of Maryland, 1961 New York 

Victor Angel Rosado, B.A., Polytechnic Institute of Puerto Rico, 1957 

Puerto Rico 

David Neuman Rudo, B.S., University of Maryland, 1957 Maryland 

Peter Paul Ryiz, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 Connecticut 

Richard Daniel Sachs, University of Miami Florida 

Robert Stanley Siegel, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

Frank Joseph Sinnreich, Jr., B.S., University of Maryland, 1951 — Maryland 

Melvin Jordan Slan, B.S., University of Maryland, 1960 Maryland 

Louis Edward Snyder, Jr., B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 

South Carolina 

James Miller Steig, Georgia Institute of Technology Florida 

Stanley Merrill Stoller, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

Joseph Ashley Sullivan, University of Miami Florida 

Brett Taylor Summey, B.A., University of North Carolina, 1957 

North Carolina 

John Harvey Swann, B.S., University of Maryland, 1956 Maryland 

Jerry Dale Taft, B.S., University of Maryland, 1961 Montana 

Bill Edward Taylor, University of Oklahoma Oklahoma 

Paul Irvin Teitelbaum, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

Donald Mathews Tilghman, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

George Bartholomew Towson, Washington College Maryland 

Norton Allen Tucker, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

Nils Glick Wallen, B.A., Syracuse University, 1957 New Jersey 

Frederic James Wasserman, B.S., University of Florida, 1957 Florida 

Alfred Stewart Wincleler, Jr., Johns Hopkins University New Jersey 

Larry Emanuel Wynne, Emory University Florida 

Stanley Leonard Zakarin, University of Florida Florida 

John Francis Zulaski, B.A., American International College, 1957 

Connecticut 

REGISTER OF STUDENTS 
1961-1962 Session 

Senior Class 

Frederick Bradshaw Abbott, Southeast Missouri State College Maryland 

Tulio Fulvio Albertini, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

James Emil Andrews, B.S., Wake Forest College, 1958 North Carolina 

46 



School of Dentistry 

Robert Apfel, B.A., University of Miami, 1958 Florida 

Marvin Bennet Apter, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

Joseph Herman Axelrod, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

Michael Alan Balenson, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

Donald Harry Barnes, College of the Pacific California 

Howard Benjamin Berman, Emory University Florida 

Samuel Blum, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 District of Columbia 

William John Bowen, B.S., University of Maryland, 1957; M.S., 1959 

Maryland 

Roger Lee Brown, University of Maryland Pennsylvania 

Peter John Buchetto, Jr., University of Connecticut Connecticut 

Barry Stanley Buchman, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

Paul William Bushman, B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1958 

Maryland 

Robert Moore Charlton, B.S., University of Maryland, 1960 Maryland 

George Gary Clendenin, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

David Constantinos, B.A., American International College, 1957 

Massachusetts 

William Howard Dickson, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

Albert William Doetzer, B.S., Loyola College, 1958 Maryland 

Richard Farish Downes, Jr., B.S., University of Maryland, 1953 Maryland 

John Theodore Drescher, B.A., University of Connecticut, 1958_ -Connecticut 

Alvin Engel, University of Maryland Maryland 

Henry Anthony Fischer, B.S., University of Florida, 1958 Florida 

James Scott Foulke, B.S., University of Maryland, 1956 Maryland 

Neil Arthur Friedman, University of Southern California California 

Thomas Brent Gable, Franklin and Marshall College Pennsylvania 

Charles Augustus Gallagher, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

Lawrence Allan Gallerani, B.A., American International College, 1958 

Massachusetts 

Ronald Irvin Glaeser, B.A., Western Maryland College, 1958 Maryland 

Milton Josef Glatzer, A.B., Rutgers College, 1958 New Jersey 

Marshall Robert Goldman, B.S., University of Maryland, 1960 Maryland 

George Joseph Goodreau, Jr., A.B., St. Anselm's College, 1953 

New Hampshire 

Robert Gordon, A.B., Boston University, 1958 Massachusetts 

Larry Earl Grace. B.S., Concord College, 1956 Virginia 

Roert Duane Hackney, B.S., The State College of Washington, 1959 

Washington 
Lawrence Frank Halpert, B.A., The Johns Hopkins University. 1958 

Maryland 

Laurence Eugene Johns, Shepherd College Maryland 

James Paul Johnson, B.S., Mount Saint Mary's College, 1958 _ .Pennsylvania 

Laddie Lynn Jones, B.S., Presbyterian College, 1958 South Carolina 

David Brainard Kirby, Jr., B.A., University of Pennsylvania, 1958 

Pennsylvania 
Martin Kline, Emory University Florida 

47 



University of Maryland 

Richard Thomas Koritzer, The Johns Hopkins University Maryland 

Robert Alan Kramer, Lafayette College New Jersey 

Daniel Levy, Emory University Georgia; 

Donald Eugene Lilley, Southern Missionary College Maryland. 

Berton Abner Lowell, University of Miami Florida 

Sidney Samuel Markowitz, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland. 

Joseph David Mechanick, B.S., University of Maryland, 1960 Maryland. 

Stephen Mark Millison, University of Maryland Maryland. 

Stephen Hollingshead Mills, University of Florida Florida^ 

Alan Tatsuo Miyamoto, B.A., Simpson College, 1958 Hawaii, 

Kermit Lee Norton, Fresno State College California- 
Harvey Sheldon Pallen, University of Florida Florida 

Robert Parker, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

Allan Buckner Pertnoy, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

Gerald Alan Pinsky, University of Miami Florida 

Albert Louis Pizzi, B.S., Springfield College, 1958 Massachusetts 

Leo Rabago, Jr., Fresno State College California 

Sylvan Rankin, B.S., University of Maryland, 1960 Maryland 

Paul Francis Regan, B.A., Boston College, 1958 Massachusetts 

Donald Arthur Romeo, A.B., St. Anselm's College, 1956 Massachusetts 

Lee Howard Roper, B.S., University of Maryland, 1960 New Hampshire 

Jack Arnold Roth, West Virginia University Maryland 

David Rubin, University of Miami Florida 

Howard Frederick Rudo, B.A., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

Joseph Anthony Salvo, Jr., B.S., Tufts College, 1958 Massachusetts 

Earle Milton Schulz, Jr., B.S., University of Maryland, 1960 Maryland 

Howard Erwin Schunick, B.S., University of Maryland, 1961 Maryland 

Frank Lewis Schwartz, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

Allen Hirch Simmons, A.B., Fresno State College, 1955 California 

Reed Campbell Snow, University of Utah Utah 

Theodore Sheldon Sobkov, B.A., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

Irvin Murray Sopher, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

Dennis Martin Sullivan, B.A., Belmont Abbey College, 1960_ -South Carolina- 
John Thomson, III, B.S., Houghton College, 1960 New Jersey 

Alan Jay Trager, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

Lamar Gordon Warren, Jr., University of Florida Florida 

Robert William Warson, B.S., Loyola College, 1958 Maryland 

Jerome Jacob Weinstein, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

John Charles Wilhelm, A.B., Western Maryland College, 1953 Maryland 

Rex Patrick Wood, B.S., The State College of Washington, 1958 

Washington 
David Ansel Young, Whittier College California 

Junior Class 

Richard Paul Beimler, A.B., Gettysburg College, 1955 New York 

Frank Melcon Benneyan, A.B., Fresno State College, 1959 California 

48 



School of Dentistry 

John David Bimestefer, A.B., Duke University, 1959 Maryland 

David Wayne Bishop, Newberry College South Carolina 

Leonard Donald Blumson, B.S., University of Miami, 1957 Maryland 

Robert Jack Burt, B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1959 Maryland 

Carl Michael Caplan, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

James McCormick Carew, B.A., St. Anselm's College, 1959__New Hampshire 

Ronald Albert Carter, A.B., Fresno State College, 1958 California 

Earl LeRoy Chambers, Jr., B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 —Maryland 

Dale Richard Collins, University of Pittsburgh Pennsylvania 

Frank Costabile, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 New Jersey 

Thomas Michael Darrigan, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 New York 

Renato Patrick DeSantis, A.B., Loyola College, 1958 Maryland 

Gene Watkins Eng, B.A., Emory University, 1959 Florida 

William Bernard Finagin, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

Michael Alan Fine, A.B., Catawba College, 1959 New York 

Robert Pacy Fleishman, Loyola College Maryland 

Stanley Berle Foxman, B.A., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

Leon Friedman, B.A., Lehigh University, 1959 New Jersey 

Franklin F. Frush, B.A., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

Richard Anthony Gallagher, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 — Maryland 

Francis Xavier Geczik, B.S., Iona College, 1959 New York 

Peter Lewis Goldstone, A.B., Harvard College, 1959 New York 

Herbert Gottlieb, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

Mark Lee Govrin, University of Maryland New Jersey 

William Herbert Griswold, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 New Jersey 

John Estyle Hanson, B.S., Shepherd College, 1959 Maryland 

Wilberto Francisco Hernandez-Vales, B.S., University of Puerto Rico, 1959 

Puerto Rico 

Stanley Elliott Hyatt, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

Carl Winston Irwin, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

Ralph William Jacobson, Emory University Florida 

William Carl Jennette, Jr., B.S., Wake Forest College, 1959 Maryland 

Dean Clyde Johnson, University of Utah Utah 

Robert Allen Katz, B.S., Boston College, 1959 Massachusetts 

Clayton Edward King, B.A., Providence College, 1959 Massachusetts 

Donald Raymond King, University of Florida Florida 

Earl Ephraim Klioze, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

Herbert Mark Koenigsberg, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

George Andrew Kraft, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 Pennsylvania 

George Krupinsky, Jr., B.A., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

Paul Max Ladd, University of Miami Florida 

Richard Joseph Landino, B.A., Providence College, 1959 Connecticut 

Stuart Theodore Landsman, B.S., Queens College, 1959 New York 

Delia Ruth Looper, B.A., Longwood College, 1959 Virginia 

Lorin George Maser, B.S., University of Maryland, 1961, District of Columbia 

Harry Charles Mullins, Concord College West Virginia 

Martin Neil Narun, B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1958 Maryland 

49 



University of Maryland 

Jerome William Newman, B.A., The Citadel, 1959 Florida 

David Bennett Nuckols, B.A., University of Tennessee, 1949 Maryland 

George William Oatis, Jr., B.S., University of Maryland, 1961 Connecticut 

Samuel Oshry, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

John Charles Pentzer, B.S., University of Maryland, 1955 Maryland 

Stanford Elliott Picker, B.A., University of California, 1958; M.A., 1959 

California 
Robert Theobald Probst, II, B.S., Iowa State College, 1950; M.S., 1952 

Connecticut 
George Michael Quinlan, Jr., B.A., American International College, 1957 

Massachusetts 

John Robert Rasczewski, Bucknell University Pennsylvania 

Richard Mann Reddish, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

Martin Stewart Reeber, University of Florida Florida 

Francis Richard Richo, B.A., Providence College, 1959 Connecticut 

Edward Richard Rose, B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1959 Maryland 

Ivan Alan Rosengarden, B.A., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

Howard Leslie Rothschild, B.S., University of Maryland, 1960 Maryland 

Paul Rubinstein, University of Maryland Maryland 

Nicolaus Sakiewicz, B.S., Columbia University, 1959 New Jersey 

Robert Alan Samuel, University of Florida Florida 

Fred Maurice Scholnick, B.S., University of Maryland, 1960 Maryland 

Paul Wesley Shaffer, West Virginia University Maryland 

Donald Siegendorf, University of Miami Florida 

Howard Ronald Siegler, University of Miami New York 

Junius Thomas Soliday, Davis and Elkins College West Virginia 

Edward David Spire, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

John Walter Staubach, B.S., Franklin and Marshall College, 1960 Maryland 

George Cyril Strong, Los Angeles City College California 

Eberhard Wolfgang Tinter, Iona College New York 

Thomas John Toman, University of Maryland Maryland 

Norman Michael Trabulsy, B.S., University of Miami, 1957 Florida 

Henry John Van Hassel, B.A., Maryville College, 1954 New Jersey 

Lorenzo Stephan Vazzana, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

Kenneth Harold Webster, B.S., State College of Washington, 1960 

Washington 

Roger Allan Webster, University of Oregon California 

Francis William Welch, B.S., Springfield College, 1958 Massachusetts 

Paul Xavier Welch, American International College Massachusetts 

George Carl White, West Virginia University West Virginia 

Joseph Michael Wiesenbaugh, Jr., Mount Saint Mary's College Pennsylvania 

Harvey Ray Wildman, B.S., Mount Saint Mary's College, 1959 

Connecticut 
Herbert Alan Wolford, D.V.M., Michigan State College, 1952 —Pennsylvania 

Sheldon Joel Wollman, Johns Hopkins University Maryland 

Gary Lee Womer, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 Maryland 

50 



School of Dentistry 

Maurice Richard Woodard, B.S., American University, 1952 Maryland 

Donald Russell Yent, Virginia Polytechnic Institute Maryland 

Sophomore Class 

Charles Bernard Abelson, B.S., University of Maryland, 1961 Maryland 

Fred Norton Ansel, B.S., University of Maryland, 1961 Maryland 

Paul Vincent Beauvais, B.S., St. Francis College, 1960 Massachusetts 

Lucien Ernest Benoit, Providence College Rhode Island 

Bernard Harry Blaustein, B.S., University of Maryland, 1960 Maryland 

Donald Lee Bloum, B.A., Washington Missionary College, 1956 _ -Maryland 

William Langton Brice, University of Maryland Maryland 

Albert Edward Carlotti, Jr., B.S., University of Rhode Island, 1960 

Rhode Island 

Edgar Harold Chambers, B.S., University of Miami, 1960 Florida 

Martin Leo Chaput, B.A., Merrimack College, 1960 Massachusetts 

Stephen Robert Cognata, University of California California 

William Clise Colwell, B.S., Washington State University, 1961 — Washington 

Joseph Louis Corey, A.B., West Virginia University, 1960 West Virginia 

Ronald Dalinsky, B.S., University of Maryland, 1961 Maryland 

Glenn Boyd Dickerson, University of South Carolina South Carolina 

Charles Edward Doll, Jr., B.S., Saint Bonaventure University, 1960 

New York 

Robert Lore Early, B.A., Ohio Wesleyan University, 1960 Maryland 

Edward Robert Emerson, Washington College Maryland 

Barry Elliott Feldman, B.S., University of Maryland, 1961 Maryland 

Burton Morton Finifter, B.A., University of Maryland, 1960 Maryland 

Robert Paul Fogarty, University of Utah Utah 

Clark Neamand Foulke, B.S., University of Maryland, 1957 Maryland 

Lawrence Fox, B.A., University of Maryland, 1960 Maryland 

Francis Leon Fraser, A.B., Carroll College, 1955 Maryland 

John Michael Freiler, B.S., Moravian College, 1960 New Jersey 

Richard Anthony Gaudio, A.B., Providence College, 1959 Connecticut 

John Charles Gigliotti, B.S., University of Maryland, 1960 Maryland 

Gary Kenneth Gold, B.S., University of Maryland, 1960 Maryland 

Ira Norman Goldbach, University of Miami Florida 

Rodney Frank Golden, B.S., University of Maryland, 1961 Maryland 

Leroy Goren, University of Maryland Maryland 

Constantinos Xenophon Govedaros, University of Maryland Maryland 

Edward George Grace. Jr., B.S., Mount Saint Mary's College, 1960 

New York 

Marian Carter Greear, Jr., University of Florida Florida 

Stephen Michael Grussmark, University of Florida Florida 

Dennis Wright Guard, University of Maryland Maryland 

Thomas Kenneth Guglielmo, Jr., B.S., Mount Saint Mary's College, 1960 

New Jersey 
John Patrick Hackett, Bucknell University New Jersey 

51 



University of Maryland 

Paul Ronald Hall, B.S., University of Maryland, 1960 Maryland 

Joseph Gold Handelman, B.S., University of Maryland, 1960 Maryland 

Alan Howard Hart, B.S., University of Maryland, 1961 Maryland 

Frederick Guy Herrick, B.S., Bates College, 1960 New Jersey 

Jeffrey Alan Herrman, University of Miami Florida 

Robert William Hilkene, Fairleigh Dickinson University New Jersey 

Lawrence Edwards Himelfarb, B.A., University of Pennsylvania, 1960 

Maryland 

Joseph Hinich, Jr., Utah State University Utah 

Maxwell Patrick Hogan, Niagara University New York 

Charles Edward Hunt, B.A., Western Maryland College, 1958 Maryland 

John Roedel Jaeger, Jr., B.S., Dickinson College, 1960 Maryland 

Ron, James Jonas, B.S., Washington State University, 1961 Washington 

John Joseph Jordan, B.S., University of Scranton, 1957 Pennsylvania 

Clifford Harold Jue, University of California California 

Richard Bennett Kirk, B.S., Baldwin-Wallace College, 1959 New Jersey 

Albert Hiram Klair, Jr., Washington College Maryland 

Stanley Louis Kolker, University of Maryland Maryland 

Neil Woodrow Lamb, B.S., University of Maryland, 1960 Maryland 

Jeffrey Allen Legum, B.A., University of Maryland, 1960 Maryland 

Harold Bernard Levine, University of Miami Florida 

Malcolm Lawrence Mclnnis, Providence College Massachusetts 

Donald Lee Maloof, University of Maryland Maryland 

Franklin Eugene May, B.S., Loyola College, 1956 Maryland 

Ian Bertram Miller, B.S., University of Maryland, 1961 Maryland 

Walter Merrill Miller, B.A., University of Maryland, 1960 Maryland 

David Lawrence Mincey, A.B., University of North Carolina, 1960 

North Carolina 

Richard Stephen Nemes, Montgomery Junior College Maryland 

Robert Preston Nitzell, A.B., The Johns Hopkins University, 1962 Maryland 

Wayne Lance O'Roark, B.S., University of Maryland, 1960 Maryland 

Albert Louis Ousborne, Jr., B.S., University of Maryland, 1961 Maryland 

Robert Pete Padousis, B.S., University of Maryland, 1961 Maryland 

Charles Bernard Parr, Jr., Loyola College Maryland 

John Fairfax Patterson, B.S., University of Maryland, 1960 Maryland 

Lance David Petersen, Montgomery Junior College Maryland 

Stanley Martin Plies, University of Maryland Maryland 

Ernest Alfred Ponce, San Bernardino Valley College California 

Norman Henry Proulx, B.A., Saint Anselm's College, 1960 New Hampshire 

Philip Howard Pushkin, B.A., University of Maryland, 1960 Maryland 

Irving Jacob Raksin, B.S., University of Maryland, 1960 Maryland 

Albert Richard Rayne, B.S., Washington College, 1960 Maryland 

Norman Robert Ressin, University of Maryland Maryland 

Charles Milton Rosenberg, B.A., Emory University, 1960 Georgia 

John Nicholas Russo, Jr., B.S., Mount Saint Mary's College, 1960 Delaware 

John Winthrop Sargent, B.S., University of Florida, 1960 New Jersey 

John Reno Savoia, B.S., Springfield College, 1960 Massachusetts 

52 



School of Dentistry 

James Lawrence Schatz, B.S., Loyola College, 1960 Maryland 

Thomas Anthony Simes, B.S., University of Cincinnati, 1957 Ohio 

Harvey Frank Simon, University of Maryland Maryland 

Douglas Graham Spink, Jr., B.A., Seton Hall University, 1960 

Massachusetts 

Victor Elliott Spiro, A.B., Boston University, 1959 Massachusetts 

Albert Haywood Swain, B.S., University of Maryland, 1960 New Jersey 

Herbert Barry Taragin, University of Maryland Maryland 

Jerome Bernard Taragin, Georgetown University District of Columbia 

Clinton Dee Taylor, University of Utah Utah 

Mervin Armel Todd, A.B., Duke University, 1960 New Jersey 

Charles Edward Toomey, 111, B.S., Washington and Lee University, 1959 

Maryland 

Warren Kenneth Veith, B.A., Ohio State University, 1960 New Jersey 

Thomas Francis Walsh, B.S., Mount Saint Mary's College, 1960 New York 

Ronald Stanley Wershba, B.S., Long Island University, 1960 New York 

David L. White, Jr., A.B., University of California, 1960 California 

Theodore Toms Wycall, B.S., Florida Southern College, 1960 New Jersey 

John Paroy Youngman, Saint Petersburg Junior College Florida 

Freshman Class 

Juan Alberto Arias, B.A., Hilyer College, 1961 Panama 

Carolyn Elizabeth Barclay, B.S., University of Maryland, 1961 Maryland 

Marcus Herman Barrera, A.B., Florida State, 1961 Florida 

Marvin Allen Becker, B.S., Pennsylvania Military College, 1961 Maryland 

Ronald Jacob Berman, University of Maryland Maryland 

Sheldon Arnold Bloom, University of Maryland Maryland 

Gilles Ivan Boissonneault, Hilyer College Connecticut 

James Edward Bradley, B.A., George Washington University, 1961 

Maryland 

Stuart Allen Broth, University of Maryland Maryland 

Robert James Carey, B.S., Loyola College, 1961 Maryland 

John Paul Cattaneo, A.B., St. Michael's College, 1961 New York 

Joseph Mathew Chasko, B.S., University of Miami, 1957 Florida 

Anthony Eugene Curcio, LaSalle College New York 

George Eugene Dent, B.S., George Washington University, 1961 Maryland 

James William Donaldson, B.S., University of Maryland, 1961 

District of Columbia 

Albert Irvin Dorfman, University of Maryland Maryland 

Francis Thomas Dougherty, B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1961 

New Jersey 

John Russell Earnhart, B.S., University of Alabama, 1957 Maryland 

Leonard David Efrom, University of Maryland Maryland 

Gerald Richard Eisenberg, B.S., Dickinson College, 1961 Maryland 

William Wood Eldridge, Rollins College Florida 

Guy Ronald Estes, University of Florida Florida 

53 



University of Maryland 

Sylvan Feldman, University of Maryland Maryland 

Philip Saul Ferris, University of Maryland Maryland 

Stanley Paul Foreman, B.A., University of Maryland, 1961 Maryland 

Donald Joseph Forno, B.A., University of Maryland, 1961 Maryland 

Theodore Stuart Freedman, A.B., Indiana University, 1960 Indiana 

Nelson Charles Freeman, B.A., University of Connecticut, 1961 

Connecticut 

John Anthony Frensilli, B.A., Holy Cross College, 1961 Massachusetts 

Harry Lee Friedman, B.S., University of Maryland, 1960 Maryland 

Charles Albert Gagne, B.A., Holy Cross College, 1961 Massachusetts 

Joseph William Gallagher, A.B., St. Joseph's College, 1961 Delaware 

Frederick Joseph Geating, University of Maryland Maryland 

Alan Paul Girard, University of Miami New York 

John Joseph Golski, Seton Hall University New Jersey 

Richard 0. Goodman, University of North Carolina Maryland 

Jack LeRoy Graham, A.B., San Jose State College, 1960 California 

Warren Granek, B.S., University of Maryland, 1961 Maryland 

Murray Gerald Greenberg, B.S., University of Maryland, 1959 Maryland 

Stephen Arthur Greene, A.B., Middlebury College, 1961 New Jersey 

Edward George Gutman, B.A., University of Maryland, 1961 Maryland 

Robert James Haarmeyer, B.S., Mt. St. Mary's College, 1961 

Pennsylvania 

Ronald Frank Hanswirth, A.B., Boston University, 1961 Massachusetts 

John Knox Hart, Waynesburg College Pennsylvania 

John Wallace Hathaway, B.S., Iowa Wesleyan College, 1960 _ -Massachusetts 

Richard Allen Hawse, A.B., Duke University, 1961 Florida 

William Howard Helfert, Montgomery Junior College Maryland 

John Michael Iacono, B.S., St. John's College, 1961 New York 

William Andrew Imbach, B.S., Mt. Mary's College, 1961 Maryland 

Marcus Pitkin Johnson, B.A., Williams College, 1959 Maryland 

Michael H. Josephson, Los Angeles City College California 

Harvey Alan Kallins, University of Maryland Maryland 

Morton Irvin Katz, University of Maryland Maryland 

Herschel Benjamin Kaufman, A.B., Emory University, 1960 

South Carolina 

William Edward Kaufman, B.S., University of Florida, 1961 Florida 

Thomas Lewis Klechak, Wake Forest College Maryland 

William Leonard Knoche, Loyola College Maryland 

William Nicholas Koutrelakos, B.A., University of New Hampshire, 1953; 

M.Ed., Loyola College, 1961 Maryland 

Martin Harold Lewis, University of Miami Florida 

James Nicholas Leyko, B.S., Loyola College, 1961 Maryland 

Rodger Howard Lofland, A.B., Catawba College, 1961 Florida 

Arnold Gerard McGreevy, Mt. St. Mary's College Maryland 

James Edgar MacBride, B.S., Elizabethtown College, 1961 Pennsylvania 

Leonard Louis Maranto, LaSalle College Maryland 

John Mills Martin, B.S., University of Maryland, 1957 Maryland 

54 



School of Dentistry 

Joseph Edward Mazikas, B.A., St. Vincent College, 1951 Pennsylvania 

Sheldon Meltzer, B.S., Muhlenberg College, 1961 New Jersey 

David Scranton Meroney, University of Maryland Maryland 

Robert Austin Mullen, Mt. St. Mary's College New York 

Steven Arnold Nachman, University of Maryland Maryland 

Michael Josephat Oles, B.S., Loyola College, 1960 Maryland 

Glenn Lamar Paulk, A.B., Emory University, 1961 Georgia 

Barrett Joel Raff, B.S., Brooklyn College of Pharmacy, 1960 New York 

James D. Rawlins, Tusculum College Delaware 

Alan Rosenfeld, University of Maryland Maryland 

Alex Michael Rudewicz, B.S., University of Hartford, 1961 Connecticut 

Robert H. Schuckman, Rutgers University New Jersey 

Andrew Albert Schwab, University of Miami Florida 

Harry Benesh Schwartz, B.S., University of Maryland, 1961 Maryland 

Paul Clark Sebastian, B.S., University of Maryland, 1961 

District of Columbia 

David Bachrach Shuman, Lafayette College Maryland 

Wilbur King Smith, Western Maryland College Maryland 

Barry Edward Solomon, University of Maryland Maryland 

Stephen Nicholas Sovich, University of Maryland Maryland 

Richard Hopkins Stag, University of Maryland Maryland 

Lamon Arlie Stewart, Mars Hill College Maryland 

Richard Edward Thomason, B.A., Washington Missionary College, 1960 

Maryland 

John Francis Tintle, B.A., Seton Hall University, 1961 New Jersey 

Allen Anthony Vessel, B.S., University of Maryland, 1961 Maryland 

Kay Oliver Wadsworth, B.S., Walla Walla College, 1960 Oregon 

Steven Martin White, University of Maryland Maryland 

Wayne Wilson Wibby, B.A., University of Maine, 1960 Maine 

Harold Wallace Wilson, University of Maryland New York 

Larry Joseph Wisman, University of Maryland Maryland 

Walter Raymond Wolk, B.S., Trinity College, 1958 Connecticut 

Lawrence Fred Yampolsky, B.S., University of Alabama, 1961 New Jersey 

Edward Louis Zak, St. Michael's College Massachusetts 

Arnold Stuart Zimmerman, Monmouth College New Jersey 

Charles Harry Zois, Rutgers University New Jersey 

Vincent Joseph Zugay, B.S., Indiana State Teachers College, 1955; 

A.M., George Washington University, 1960 Maryland 



55 



University of Maryland 

DEANS OF DENTAL SCHOOLS IN BALTIMORE 

BALTIMORE COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 

(Founded 1840) 

Chapin A. Harris 1840—1841 

Thomas E. Bond 1841—1842 

Washington R. Handy 1842—1853 

Philip H. Austen 1853—1865 

Ferdinand J. S. Gorgas 1865 — 1882 

Richard B. Winder 1882—1894 

M. Whilldin Foster 1894—1914 

William G. Foster 1914—1923 

MARYLAND DENTAL COLLEGE 

1873—1878 (Merged with B. C. D. S.) 

Richard B. Winder 1873—1878 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

(Founded 1882) 

Ferdinand J. S. Gorgas 1882—1911 

Timothy 0. Heatwole 1911—1923 

BALTIMORE MEDICAL COLLEGE 

1895—1913 (Merged with U. of Md.) 

J. William Smith 1895—1901 

William A. Montell 1901—1903 

J. Edgar Orrison 1903—1904 

J. William Smith 1904—1913 

BALTIMORE COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 

DENTAL SCHOOL 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

(B. C. D. S. Joined the U. of Md. 1923) 

Timothy O. Heatwole 1923—1924 

J. Ben Robinson 1924—1953 

Myron S. Aisenberg (Acting) 1953 

Myron S. Aisenberg 1954 — present 

56 



School of Dentistry 



INDEX 



Academic Calendar 2 

Admission Requirements 11 

Admission with Advanced 

Standing 15 

Alumni Association 40 

Anatomy 25 

Application Procedures 14 

Arts and Sciences — 

Dental Program 12 

Attendance Requirements 15 

Baltimore Union 21 

Biochemistry 26 

Board of Regents 1 

Cafeteria 21 

Curriculum, Plan of 23-24 

Deans of the Baltimore 

Dental Schools 56 

Definition of Residence and 

Non-Residence 19 

Dental History and Literature 26 
Dental Prosthesis 

Removable Complete and 

Partial Prosthesis 27 

Fixed Partial Prosthesis 28 

Deportment 16 

Description of Courses 25 

Diagnosis 29 

Dormitory Accommodations 21 

Equipment Requirements 16 

Faculty Listing 3 

Fees, Graduate 18 

Fees, Student 17 

Freshman Class 53 

Gorgas Odontological Society 40 

Graduating Class (1960-61 

Session) 44 

Graduation Requirements 16 



Histology 29 

History of the School 9 

Index 57 

Junior Class 48 

Library 11 

Matriculation and Enrollment 14 

Medicine 

General Medicine 30 

Oral Medicine 31 

Microbiology 32 

Officers of Administration 3 

Officers of Instruction 3 

Omicron Kappa Upsilon 40 

Operative Dentistry 33 

Orthodontics 34 

Pathology 34 

Pedodontics 35 

Pharmacology 35 

Physiology 36 

Postgraduate Courses 18 

Practice Administration 37 

Promotion and Grading 15 

Refunds 18 

Registration 18 

Requirements for Admission 11 

Requirements for Graduation 16 

Requirements for Matriculation 

and Enrollment 14 

Roentgenology 37 

Scholarship and Loan Funds 20 

Senior Class 46 

Senior Prize Awards 42 

Sophomore Class 51 

Summer Courses 39 

Student Health Service 19 

Surgery 38 

Visual Aids 39 



57 




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